Peru 1-0 Venezuela – 2015 Copa América Group C (18 June 2015)

2015 Copa América Group C

Thursday 18 June 2015 – Estadio Elías Figueroa, Valparaíso, Chile

Peru 1-0 Venezuela 

Highlights of Peru 1-0 Venezuela, 2015 Copa América Group C, 18 June 2015 (Video courtesy of Copa America 2015)

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): Baroja; Rosales, Vizcarrondo, Túñez, Amorebieta (sent off, 29′); Rincón, Seijas (Miku, 82′); R. Vargas (Cichero, 38′), Arango (Martínez, 73′), Guerra; S. Rondón.

Peru (4-2-2-2): Gallese; Advincula, Zambrano, Ascues, Vargas; Ballón, Lobatón (Reyna, 46′); Cueva (Hurtado, 83′), Sánchez; Pizarro (Yotún, 90′), Guerrero.

Amorebieta’s Red Card Leaves Venezuela in a Precarious Final-Day Position 

Match Report

Starting off the day in the dizzying position of being able to secure a place in the knock-out stage with a win, Venezuelan hopes now very much hang in the balance as Fernando Amorebieta’s red card put them on the back foot for over an hour, during which they were ultimately undone by Claudio Pizarro’s strike. 

Given the memorable upset against Colombia followed by, in turn, Los Cafeteros‘ frenetic win against Brazil, things were going almost disconcertingly well for La Vinotinto, as ultimately winning the group also seemed an eminent possibility. While even now that still can not be ruled out, many fans will be cursing the moment the Championship defender received his marching orders, as up until that point, Noel Sanvicente’s men were very much in with a chance of winning.

Indeed, in the well-contested early exchanges played at the home of Santiago Wanderers, the boys in burgundy were certainly less reserved than they were against Colombia, playing instead with more attacking freedom. Málaga’s roaming right-back Roberto Rosales looked particularly eager, combining well with captain Juan Arango from the flank, playing the occasional give-and-go. Midfielder Alejandro Guerra had the first effort on goal after a mere three minutes, striking somewhat optimistically from a central position 25 yards out and four minutes later, he was to be the provider for what was to be Venezuela’s best chance of the game.

As in the Colombia match, Guerra exhibited some encouraging understanding with Salomón Rondón, once again crossing from the left with his right towards the Zenit St. Petersburg striker. However, though the opening-day headline-grabber had a yard on his marker, he was unable to guide the ball either side of Pedro Gallese, with it instead meekly going into the Juan Aurich goalkeeper’s grateful hands. Subsequently, Guerra, at least, was to continue to have a decent half, whipping in a testing ball from time to time and nearly having a half-chance on 15 minutes, though he could not quite control Ronald Vargas’ return pass on the edge of the area, with the ball instead trickling through to Gallese.

Throughout this period as well as, indeed, the rest of the match, Peru regularly made forward forays and put in many crosses, particularly from Paolo Guerrero on the left and Luis Advíncula on the right. In doing so, while these balls were never effectively connected with, they did highlight the slightly larger gap in this game between Venezuela’s defence and midfield than existed against Colombia, which led to some jitters and nervy clearances.

However, this modest level of apprehension could only increase on the 29th minute when Sanvicente’s men lost one of their number. Indeed, the beginning of the end occurred for Amorebieta, who had hitherto largely been noticeable for hoisting long balls upfield for Rondón to knock down, when a tussle with Guerrero near the halfway line occurred. As the Flamengo new-boy gained some space, the ex-Athletic Bilbao man pulled his shirt back, sending him to the ground, where upon he ostensibly attempted to skip past him, only to land with the studs of his right boot nastily clipping the Peruvian’s left knee. Upon the resulting dismissal, perhaps partly due to the incident occurring on the far side to the cameras, shock was initally expressed by the commentators, fans on social media and many in the stadium.

However, the referee had a good view and did not hesitate in brandishing the red card, no doubt instinctively viewing Amorebieta’s actions as that of a wily professional who knew what he was doing. Indeed, the casual, faux-disinterested shirt-pulling was similar to the manner in which he landed down on Guerrero’s already vulnerable leg and attempted to continue as if nothing of note had occurred. While, predictably, many Venezuelans feel it was accidental and point to his startled response upon seeing red as further proof, though one can never be entirely sure, one could just as easily state that his expression was that of a man who could not believe he did not get away with actions that have worked for him in the past. As Opta Jose pointed out, he is not a man renowned for clean play with only Sergio Ramos (12) receiving more red cards than he did while in Spain (11). Following on from another underwhelming club season when, particularly at Fulham before he made a brief loan switch to Middlesbrough, he was regularly exposed and off-the-pace, it seems that, to some at least, in Valparaíso he confirmed pre-tournament concerns that he was a potential liability.

Several minutes afterwards, Ronald Vargas, who had drawn praise for his performance against Colombia, was taken off to be replaced by Gabriel Cichero, a natural left-back who has played seven of the eight friendly games of the Sanvicente era. He was also a regular in the 2011 competition and throughout the remainder of this game appeared to take it in turns with midfielder Luis Manuel Seijas to cover the left flank.

With cries of ‘VEN-E-ZUEL-A’ distantly heard from the stands, La Vinotinto‘s relatively humble following rallied behind their representatives as the half was to end with several more Peruvian crosses being swung in without any meaningful attacking contact being made. Nevertheless, given the man-disadvantage, each attempt to breach the Venezuelan area was to cause some visibly hesitant defending, though well into the second half, Los Incas were to continue to struggle to create genuine chances.

Indeed, after the interval, much of the first 25 minutes or so consisted of often good initial balls by the likes of Advíncula, Guerrero and Juan Manuel Vargas. One of the latter’s early crosses from the left was met by Guerrero towards the near post but due to the lack of space, the striker could only head it comfortably wide. Soon afterwards, Guerrero was to also manage a header that looped a few yards over but it was Advíncula, in particular, who was responsible for some of the best crosses and wingplay, particularly just after the hour-mark when he dashed past his man into the area, pulling back a low ball that none of his team-mates could meet. Owing in part to their inability to create decent chances from the flanks against a solid Venezuela who were always growing in confidence, a few speculative efforts came in from outside the area. However, the most notable of these – both of which fell to Fiorentina’s Vargas, consisting of a volley from a short headed clearance and and shot screwed a few yards wide from near the dee – were of little actual threat.

Despite seeing more of the ball, Peru were occasionally vulnerable to counter-attacks and other Venezuelan forays, the fear of which was always rising so long as the teams remained level. Rondón was to have two similar occasions to scare the opposition back-line, first in the 50th minute when Guerra slid the ball forward but though he looked like he may power away from two of the defenders, Advíncula ultimately blocked him off. Just over ten minutes later, it was Arango who passed it up to Salo, but again, his opponents caught up and stopped him from getting a shot away. Just before this, Venezuela’s leading man was involved in another move where he played a pass to the edge of the area to Arango, whose somewhat disguised pass went to Guerra but, though the latter was in a good position inside the area, he struggled to direct his attempt goalwards.

Having perservered for over 25 minutes of the second half and with the distant cheers for the side still audible, Venezuelan hopes that they may grab a valiant point grew. Alas, it was not to be. For a team that had defended rather well under the circumstances, the manner of the goal was somewhat difficult to take. Indeed, occurring in the 73rd minute, winger Christian Cueva was quick to a clearance, taking the ball forward and attempting a pass into the area that Rincón stretched for. However, unfortunately for the Genoa midfielder, his slide merely guided the ball to veteran Claudio Pizarro who, in space around eight yards out, blasted the ball past Alain Baroja, who could only get a hand to it. The 36-year-old Bayern Munich striker was only playing because of an injury to his Bundesliga colleague, the pacy Jefferson Farfán of Schalke 04, yet he certainly took this rare Peruvian chance when it came to him, in doing so scoring his first international goal since October 2013.

In immediate response, Sanvicente stepped up his side’s efforts to get a goal, removing the aging Arango to bring on the more mobile Torino youngster Josef Martínez. Another attack-minded change was made nearly ten minutes later when midfielder Seijas was replaced by Rayo Vallecano striker Miku. However, aside from the latter playing a ball up the left side into the area for Rondón that ultimately could not be properly controlled, these moves had little impact as Peru were able to hold on to their lead without any grave difficulty until the final whistle.

Group C: How it Stands

Thus, while this group may not have entirely proceeded as anticipated, the game which pre-tournament many felt would play the largest role in determining the qualification chances of Peru and Venezuela may yet still do so. With all four teams on three points going into the final matches, both will be underdogs in their respective games. However, as of 21 June, the day of these encounters, the despair that greeted the Peru result has subsided somewhat for many Venezuelan fans. Indeed, not only has Brazilian golden boy Neymar been ruled out of the rest of the tournament but also the possibility of nabbing at least the second third-best-placed side berth still seems within the grasp of Sanvicente’s men.

While Group B’s third-placed side, Uruguay (four points), are assured of a knock-out spot, Group A’s Ecuador will be waiting anxiously on the outcome of the two final Group C fixtures, as they have finished third with just three points and a goal difference of -2. Venezuela currently have three points and a neutral goal difference and so, playing after Colombia take on Peru if, as the average fan will be anticipating, the former beats the latter, La Vinotinto‘s task for the 90 minutes could be to play to frustrate and counter against Brazil in a manner comparable to the Colombia game. Indeed, while if such a scenario were to occur both teams could play for a draw, as whoever finishes third will face Argentina in the knock-out stage, whereas the runner-up will be against Bolivia and the winner gets Paraguay, this may not seem quite so appealing. Ultimately, there are many different permutations and it may well come down to goals scored rather than simply goal difference but nevertheless, provided there is a winner in the Colombia-Peru game, Venezuela could well lose their match and, so long as it is only a marginal defeat, still yet progress.

However, with Neymar out and a lot of hostility towards Dunga returning after an otherwise respectable year in charge since returning for a second spell, while it may be a tad optimistic, a first ever competitive win against Brazil can not be ruled out for Venezuela. If such an event were to transpire, one can only apologise for the inevitable tardiness in updating this site in the subsequent days.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

3 thoughts on “Peru 1-0 Venezuela – 2015 Copa América Group C (18 June 2015)

  1. Pingback: Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – September 2015 Preview | The Ball is Hispanospherical

  2. Pingback: Venezuela’s CONMEBOL Qualifying Campaign for FIFA World Cup 2018 – October 2015 Preview | The Ball is Hispanospherical

  3. Pingback: Venezuela’s CONMEBOL Qualifying Campaign for FIFA World Cup 2018 – March 2016 Preview | The Ball is Hispanospherical

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