Brazil 2-1 Venezuela – 2015 Copa América Group C (21 June 2015)

2015 Copa América Group C

Sunday 21 June – Estadio Monumental David Arellano, Santiago, Chile

Brazil 2-1 Venezuela

Highlights of Brazil 2-1 Venezuela, 2015 Copa América Group C, 21 June 2015 (Video courtesy of Copa America 2015)

Team Selections

Brazil (4-2-3-1): Jefferson; D. Alves, Miranda, T. Silva, F. Luís; Fernandinho, Elias; Willian, Coutinho (Tardelli, 67′), Robinho (Marquinhos, 76′); Firmino (Luiz, 67′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): Baroja; Rosales, Vizcarrondo, Túñez, Cichero; Rincón, Seijas (Martínez, 46′); R. Vargas (C. González, 46′), Arango, Guerra (Miku, 72′); S. Rondón.

Late Rally Not Enough as Venezuela Exit Copa América

Match Report

Although Brazil and Venezuela could well have conspired to draw this final group stage game to ensure the pair progressed from Group C, the Seleção were evidently in no mood to take any chances, ultimately sending La Vinotinto out of the competition.

While Noel Sanvicente’s men rallied late on, it was Dunga’s under-fire charges who were on top for the majority of the match, taking it to their opponents from the start with Neymar’s replacement Robinho often the ringleader. Indeed, the now 31-year-old belied his age while rampaging all across the attacking midfield area and was to set up the opening goal. His ninth-minute corner was met by PSG’s Thiago Silva, who got in front of Andrés Túñez and emphatically volleyed past Alain Baroja at a pace that the 25-year-old Caracas FC goalkeeper will have rarely encountered before.

In response to this setback, there was some urgency in Venezuela’s forward play, though they struggled to get into meaningful positions within the final third. Instead, the next chance fell to Robinho, who was really finding his groove, as Dani Alves passed to the ex-Real Madrid man just outside the area on the centre-right. With the ball gently bouncing into his stride, he swept a graceful strike just over the crossbar. A few minutes later, a bit of space enjoyed in Brazilian territory allowed Ronald Vargas to blaze over from 30 yards.

However, this was nothing compared to what was going on at the other end, as Dunga’s men regularly found room on the flanks and just past the midway point in the half put Venezuela under some sustained pressure. Indeed, soon after Willian got away from his man on the right, his Chelsea team-mate Filipe Luís marched through on the left and blasted hard from an angle, drawing a parry from Baroja. The subsequent corner was knocked down and caused many jitters in the area as two shots were desperately blocked by the swarm of Venezuelan bodies that had come back. Sanvicente’s men were not coping well with the pace of their more illustrious opponents and could often be their own worst enemies when going forward, struggling to even control some basic passes with rather heavy touches.

Attack-wise, their next moment of note came via a surprisingly under-utilised weapon in their armoury during this tournament: the set-piece. Alas, as if to further emphasise the slim pickings that they were scraping by on, Roberto Rosales’ long-range central free-kick was merely flicked on by Túñez straight into the hands of Jefferson. Most attacks in the first half were instead in and around the other area as, coming up to half-time, Roberto Firmino drove along the touchline on the left before winning a corner and then, not long afterwards, Robinho had a right-footed strike parried wide for another corner. However unintentionally, with around a minute left before the break Venezuela caused Jefferson some mild concern, when left-back Gabriel Cichero’s ball dipped a bit too close towards the goal-frame for comfort, ultimately going wide.

When half-time came, Sanvicente knew he would need to inject more attacking impetus into the side and so replaced Ronald Vargas and Luis Manuel Seijas with César González and Josef Martínez, moves which would gradually have at least some effect on proceedings. However, this was not to occur until the latter stages of the game as before this, Brazil were to continue to exert their dominance.

Three minutes into the half, the impressive Willian did a stepover and then put in a ball that hit Túñez to go behind. From the resulting corner, Silva must have thought his header was going to make it two, but instead Baroja got down low to pull off a great save that will do his growing reputation no harm at all. Nevertheless, barely a minute later the lead was indeed doubled as Willian did great on the left to get away from Rosales before putting in a delightful ball with the outside of his right that bypassed Túñez and was finished off by Firmino. 2-0 and it was hard to see how Venezuela could get back into it.

        Indeed, even though they did gradually come to make more forward forays as their opponents relaxed and the atmosphere subsided somewhat, it was not until the last five minutes or so that an actual comeback seemed possible. One rare repository of hope were the free-kicks of Juan Arango and on 56 minutes he curled one with his revered left peg that may have been going half a yard over the bar but Jefferson nevertheless tipped it on its way for a corner. Little more than a minute later, the Botafogo goalkeeper dived outwards to parry away a cross that came in from the left from substitute González. Shortly afterwards, Jefferson was further kept busy by the other man introduced for the second half, young Torino attacker Martínez, who from a crowded position on the right of the area struck well but much too close to the goalkeeper for it to be of serious concern.
        Despite these moments of optimism for Venezuela, they knew Brazil and especially Robinho still had plenty more to offer, if necessary. In the 64th minute, the winger cut inside from the left, reeling back the years to jink past a couple of challenges outside the area before shooting a few yards wide.
      Venezuela nevertheless continued their hunt for a way back into the game. In the 71st minute, Alejandro Guerra cut the ball back from the right in the area for González, who shimmied away from a defender before having his shot crucially blocked. Soon afterwards, Guerra was substituted off for Rayo Vallecano striker Miku, a move whose significance would bear some fruit later on. In the meantime, Arango put in another good free-kick that bounced before Jefferson, who had to parry out.
      By the 76th minute, Brazil had used all three of their substitutes. Two of these – David Luiz and Marquinhos – being defenders by trade, brought the total of such players on the field to six, even if they were not all playing in the back line. A minute after their final change, Venezuela were to create another half-chance as, from the centre just outside the area, Miku was to roll the ball to the incoming González who blasted a strike not too far off the target.
    In the 81st minute, Brazil again made their presence known, this time from a Willian corner. As soon as it was headed out, it was nodded back in towards Luiz, whose scissor-kick was well-struck, but too close to Baroja, who got his full body behind it to catch.
    Three minutes later, the moment that rarely seemed likely arrived. From 25 yards out, Arango swung his third and best free-kick over the wall, which Jefferson did well to save against the post but Miku was on hand to head the rebound straight in. Suddenly, Dunga’s decision to go defensive looked complacent as Venezuela were instantly buoyed by this goal, with players and fans alike doubtless instantly recalling for inspiration the two goals they scored against Paraguay in the closing stages of the last game of the 2011 group stage.
            Alas, it was not to be, though they certainly did not go out without first giving Colombia a late fright. Deep into stoppage-time, Martínez gained some space on the left and put in a cross that went over the reach of Jefferson but, unfortunately, past Miku as well and out the other side. As the final whistle blew, many Venezuelans were still debating whether or not the La Liga striker slightly ducked out of the way of the cross, but in time, Fernando Amorebieta’s tournament-changing red card in the preceding loss against Peru should be the real talking point.
                Indeed, having sensationally upset the apple cart on the opening day with a win over Colombia, Sanvicente’s men went into their second game against Ricardo Gareca’s men in the vertiginous position of being able to secure qualification with a win. Alas, the ex-Bilbao man’s dismissal was to scupper this dream. Nevertheless, dejected as serial-winner Sanvicente doubtless currently feels, he will surely have felt some optimism from his team’s overall performance which he will seek to build on ahead of his chief aim: qualifying for Venezuela’s first-ever World Cup.
Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

2 thoughts on “Brazil 2-1 Venezuela – 2015 Copa América Group C (21 June 2015)

  1. Pingback: Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – September 2015 Preview | The Ball is Hispanospherical

  2. Pingback: Venezuela’s CONMEBOL Qualifying Campaign for FIFA World Cup 2018 – October 2015 Preview | The Ball is Hispanospherical

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