Venezuela 0-0 Uruguay – CONMEBOL Qualification Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (5 October 2017)

The seventeenth and penultimate jornada of La Vinotinto’s 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign saw Rafael Dudamel’s youthful side continue to impress with their eyes very much on a Middle East-based prize. Here, Hispanospherical.com provides a full match report and some thoughts…

CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018

Thursday 5 October 2017 – Estadio Polideportivo de Pueblo Nuevo, San Cristóbal, Táchira.

Venezuela 0-0 Uruguay

Video Highlights of Venezuela 0-0 Uruguay, CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018, 5 October 2017 (YouTube)

Stalemate Gives Venezuela Third Consecutive Draw Against Qualification Hopefuls

In a game short on clear attempts, Venezuela held Uruguay to a draw, postponing La Celeste‘s likely qualification celebrations until Tuesday.

Although his side’s ongoing inability to create chances will be of concern, La Vinotinto boss Rafael Dudamel will nevertheless be pleased to have earned his third consecutive point.

Not entirely dissimilarly, though his Uruguayan counterpart Óscar Tabárez may feel confident of wrapping up automatic qualification at home to Bolivia, he would have no doubt hoped his side could have posed a greater attacking threat in this game.

Indeed, their best opportunity of the first half was also their first: after three minutes, a hanging Cristian Rodríguez corner was headed, in space, by Atlético Madrid’s José Giménez, whose effort was spectacularly saved by Wuilker Fariñez. Tipping the ball wide as it headed towards the top corner, this was to be the much-hyped Caracas FC stopper’s only real save of the match.

Subsequently, both sides put in crosses and attempted efforts from distance but, one way or another, these mostly evaded their targets. The bobbly state of the Pueblo Nuevo pitch appeared to do zero favours for free-flowing, passing football, as each side hardly ever worked themselves into space within the final third. Instead, some individuals attempted relatively tame and/or wayward long-range efforts and the best prospects were evidently most likely to arise from set-pieces – thus it was from a corner in the 34th minute that Venezuela came closest. Here, Junior Moreno – standing in for the suspended Yangel Herrera (and Arquímedes Figuera) – saw one of his many dead balls headed back across goal by Mikel Villanueva, where it was met by left-back Rubert Quijada – himself playing in place of the suspended Rolf Feltscher – who nodded just over from a goalmouth position. That said, as much as this opportunity gave the home crowd some hope of a slight upset, the referee’s whistle had in fact already been blown for an infringement.

Soon after up at the other end, Luis Suaréz – who had been duking and diving without really winning much more than a corner – chipped a good ball to strike-partner Edinson Cavani. Though he was near the edge of the area, the qualification campaign’s top scorer must have considered this at least a half-chance, but his volley was ultimately quite weak, causing no difficulty for Fariñez.

Into the second half, the disjointedness of the play continued but the volume of the crowd noticeably increased as a little more initiative was displayed. In the 49th minute, La Vinotinto captain Tomás Rincón suddenly forced a low parry from Fernando Muslera with a pacey shot, then soon up the other end Cavani had a decent chance, this time turning dangerously from just inside the area on the right. He was squeezed for space, but his shot deflected off a defender and, though it was heading wide, Fariñez still felt that he had to dive low to make sure, as the ball brushed his gloves and went out for a corner.

With a little more space available to roam and buoyed on by the crowd, 20-year-old Sergio Córdova knocked in a cross that caused concern amongst the Uruguayan backline and then, just before the hour-mark, he tried his luck from range. However, as with most shots from this distance, this one troubled nobody but the ballboys.

However, deeper into the second half, though there was considerable midfield endeavour and some minor moments of intrigue, greater interest was provided by the introduction of a few players who starred in this year’s Under-20 tournaments. Indeed, Uruguay already had World Cup starlet Federico Valverde on the field and he was to be joined on the 65th minute by Juventus’ Rodrigo Bentancur, who was making his first ever senior appearance. On the Venezuelan side of things, Ronaldo Lucena also debuted, coming on in the 83rd minute, a few minutes after diminutive dribbler Yeferson Soteldo had also taken to the field. The latter replaced another youngster, Sergio Córdova, and, overall, with Wuilker Fariñez also in goal, Venezuela fielded four members of their Under-20 World Cup side that finished runners-up in June. With Herrera available in their final qualifier and four other youngsters in the squad, it is likely that at least one other member shall receive a run-out before this cycle is concluded.

Still, before the game itself was over, the visitors did manage to fashion two further chances to win it. Firstly, with seven minutes remaining, substitute Giorgian De Arrasceta dinked a ball over to the centre-right just inside the area, where Cavani, with a good sight of Fariñez’s goal, quickly controlled and struck. However, perhaps it was the pressure of the encroaching defenders who he had briefly stole a pace or two from or maybe it was instead a lack of composure, but either way, his shot went low and narrowly wide of the target.

It was surely his side’s best chance of the match, though their final opportunity of note was also rather presentable. This time, De Arrasceta crossed in a fine set-piece from the right towards the back post where, in space from a closer position than he was some 80-plus minutes prior, Giménez attempted to head it on the stretch. Alas, his connection lacked intent and his effort bobbled harmlessly wide.

Thus, goalless it ended. A laborious encounter in more ways than one, Venezuela will surely be the happier of the two nations, even if they do not appear to be any closer to finding any consistent attacking cohesion. Still, post-Under-20 World Cup, Dudamel has certainly managed to instil and stabilise an impressive defensive system – much-needed, even if nothing can ever entirely massage the figures in the “Goals Conceded” column.

His side’s final encounter on Tuesday sees them travel to Asunción to face qualification-chasing Paraguay, whose remarkable late win away to Colombia has given them genuine belief that they may yet nab at least the playoff berth. Against a very fired-up La Albirroja, a draw would surely constitute another credible result for La Vinotinto, but if – if – they can just build on that impressive rearguard by sneaking an unanswered goal, it really would provide a huge boost in morale.

Much of the footballing world are watching as the future of several CONMEBOL countries hangs precariously; Venezuela may be out, but they certainly have a role to play.

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-4-2): W. Fariñez; V. García, J. Chancellor, M. Villanueva, R. Quijada; S. Córdova (Y. Soteldo, 80′), J. Moreno, T. Rincón, J. Murillo (R. Lucena, 83′); S. Rondón & J. Martínez (R. Otero, 69′).

Uruguay (4-4-2): F. Muslera; M. Pereira, J. Giménez, D. Godín, M. Cáceres; N. Nández (Á. González, 83′), F. Valverde (G. De Arrascaeta, 79′), M. Vecino, C. Rodríguez (R. Bentancur, 65′); E. Cavani & L. Suárez.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

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