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Peru 0-0 Venezuela – Copa América 2019 Group A (15 June 2019)

Creditable if not a classic. Here, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto’s first Copa América 2019 game against Peru.

Copa América 2019 – Group A

Saturday 15 June 2019 – Arena do Grêmio, Porto Alegre

Peru 0-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Peru 0-0 Venezuela, Copa América Group A, 15 June 2019 (YouTube)

Venezuela Ride Their Luck To Hang On For A Valuable Point

In their group stage bow, Venezuela were reduced to ten men but VAR and goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez aided them to battle to a potentially crucial point.

Manager Rafael Dudamel fielded the same team that swept aside an under-strength USA, but here, against World Cup-level opposition, they were unable to combine with anything like the same verve. Perhaps it was the fear of the likely ramifications of losing, possibly it owed something to the stadium being less than one-quarter full, but whatever the cause, overall it was a rather lacklustre game.

The frequent stoppages didn’t help matters. The first of these came after seven minutes when Peru thought that they had taken the lead. Talismanic striker Paolo Guerrero was fouled by left-back Luis Mago on the right edge of the area and the resulting free-kick was swung into the danger zone. The cross was contested by Renato Tapia and Faríñez and the goalkeeper was left red-faced as he failed to collect it, with the ball instead bobbling to Christofer Gonzáles, who composed himself well to bounce a strike that ended up in the top corner of the net. However, after a four-minute wait, the goal was ruled out owing to an offside picked up by VAR. Nobody can argue with this decision, but they certainly can with the time it took to reach it as well as how this was factored into the amount of stoppage-time allocated. Indeed, given that several players were to later find themselves down on the deck for prolonged periods, then other than to save the organisers’ blushes, one can only wonder why the referee added on a mere four minutes at the end of the first half.

Still, Peru seemed to be in the ascendancy early on and could well have scored in the 15th minute when they broke up Mago’s side with Jefferson Farfán squaring the ball to Christian Cueva on the left edge of the area. However, despite the defenders being at sixes and sevens, the Santos attacker could only screw his strike wide of the target.

Not for the first time, Venezuela struggled to link up effectively with one another and it wasn’t until the 22nd minute that a chance of note was generated. On the left, Jhon Murillo received a diagonal ball from Jefferson Savarino and crossed into the area, with Yangel Herrera’s touch knocking it on to Salomón Rondón. The Premier League striker poked a point-blank effort goalwards but goalkeeper Pedro Gallese instinctively stuck his leg in the way to prevent a goal.

Five minutes later, Venezuela had another chance when, from an acute angle on the left, Savarino swung in a free-kick that Gallese punched away. Nevertheless, Peru soon re-asserted themselves and fashioned some half-chances: Luis Advíncula’s 32nd-minute low drive from the edge of the area that Faríñez collected at the second attempt and then a 37th-minute chest-and-strike from Guerrero which was hit with intent, albeit over the bar. Perhaps the Internacional forward was just warming up as in the 42nd minute he swung a powerful free-kick around the wall, forcing Faríñez to touch it out behind. From the resulting corner, the goalkeeper’s shaky start to the tournament continued as he weakly punched out the cross and was fortunate that, whilst he was in no-man’s-land, Tomás Rincón was covering the net and able to block Luis Abram’s goal-bound attempt.

All square at the break, the second half started a little brighter for Venezuela as Rondón’s 47th-minute free-kick just outside of the area was struck a yard or so wide.

This was a false dawn and some 15 minutes later when Farfán was granted space to head home, Los Incas thought that they had gained the lead. Again, however, Señor VAR intervened, this time to correctly adjudge that the ball was played offside before the cross even came in to the area.

Thus, another let-off for Venezuela who, courtesy of a Rondón flick five minutes later, suddenly found a hole in the Peruvian backline, but Murillo’s shot from a slight angle was aimed straight at Gallese.

Any hopes that Venezuela may just pull a crafty one on their opponents were largely put to bed in the 74th minute when Mago received his second yellow card for a badly-timed challenge. At this point, many Vinotinto fans’ memories were cast back to the 2015 Copa when fellow left-back Fernando Amorebieta also received his marching orders and a late Peru goal condemned Venezuela to a 1-0 defeat in a similarly crucial encounter.

However, it appears that Venezuela’s No. 1 is less prone to such fatalistic thoughts. Indeed, less than two minutes later he redeemed himself with a fantastic save. This came as Farfán’s effort was deflected to the back post where it looked as if it would be knocked home, yet the Millonarios goalkeeper was somehow able to anticipate the direction of the strike and claw it out from the goal line. Subsequently, the ball was played back into the goalmouth, forcing Faríñez to pull off another close-range save and then watch as the rebound was sliced against the post. As an aside, not that anyone involved was aware at the time, but these latter two attempts were from offside players.

This bout of goalmouth pinball was the biggest scare that the ten men were to face in the final 15 minutes, but not the only one: in the 81st minute, Faríñez was forced to parry wide Edison Flores’ strike from the edge of the area and two minutes later the goalkeeper breathed a sigh of relief as Farfán’s close-range header narrowly evaded the target.

Thus, overall Peru had the better of this 0-0 draw and for the majority of the second half Dudamel’s men, although never completely out of the game, struggled to really test Gallese’s gloves. Substitutes Yeferson Soteldo and Darwin Machís perhaps displayed some late attacking intent and creativity which may well influence the manager’s thinking ahead of Tuesday’s clash with Brazil, but he’ll know that they will need to do a lot better to trouble the hosts.

That said, even though Venezuela’s progression hopes are likely to be determined by the final game against Bolivia, this point, albeit gained in underwhelming circumstances, could undoubtedly prove invaluable to prolonging their stay.

To keep up-to-date with Venezuela’s Copa América campaign, please return to this website as well as follow @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

Peru (4-3-3): P. Gallese; L. Advíncula, C. Zambrano, L. Abram, M. Trauco; R. Tapia, C. Gonzáles (A. Carrillo, 88′), Y. Yotún (A. Polo, 66′); J. Farfán, P. Guerrero, C. Cueva (E. Flores, 46′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Rosales, J. Chancellor, M. Villanueva, L. Mago; J. Moreno (R. Hernández, 78′), Y. Herrera, T. Rincón; J. Savarino (D. Machís, 69′), J. Murillo (Y. Soteldo, 84′); S. Rondón.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical