Tag Archives: Barinas

Venezuela 1-0 Costa Rica – International Friendly (2 February 2016)

International Friendly

Tuesday 2 February 2016 – Estadio Agustín Tovar, Barinas

Venezuela 1-0 Costa Rica 

Video Highlights of Wilker Ángel’s goal in Venezuela 1-0 Costa Rica, International Friendly, 2 February 2016 (YouTube).

Wilker Ángel capitalised on a late goalkeeping howler to give Venezuela their first win for over seven months.

However, though ostensibly this long overdue victory came against World Cup quarter-finalists, little will have changed for under-fire manager Noel Sanvicente in the eyes of La Vinotinto’s frustrated public. Indeed, even before a ball was kicked, there was seemingly little at stake, with both nations’ squads drawn largely from their respective domestic leagues. Thus, Keylor Navas, Bryan Ruiz, Joel Campbell et al. were certainly not amongst the slain in Barinas.

Some of those that were instead selected for Los Ticos went some way towards aiding the home cause as, by the 65th minute, they were down to nine men following two dismissals. Despite this two-man advantage, familiar failings were displayed as the hosts struggled to create clear chances. Ultimately, it was to take further generosity from the visitors – in the form of experienced goalkeeper Marco Madrigal’s cack-handling – to save Sanvicente from media savagings – in the immediate aftermath, at least.

All the same, the game was at least an opportunity to break the winless streak, keep a rare clean sheet and for fringe/young players to demonstrate that they can handle wearing the burgundy shirt, if not put some additional pressure on their more illustrious, rebellious peers. While there were no storming performances, some players nevertheless stood out.

Ángel, for one, helped to keep things solid at the back and chipped in with his second international goal since making his debut in November 2014. Although he does not always convince in his defensive duties, with the first-choice centre-backs porous and, most pertinently, not getting any younger, further opportunities beckon.

With Fernando Amorebieta having resigned from the national set-up, this opens new possibilities at both centre-back and left-back. Indeed, throughout Sanvicente’s reign this spot on the flank has been contested mostly by the ex-Athletic Bilbao man and 31-year-old Gabriel Cichero (32 in April). Here as well, a vacancy is gradually emerging and Málaga youngster Mikel Villanueva did not do his prospects any harm in Barinas.

From an attacking perspective, two men were most prominent. Firstly, the man the majority of the Zamora-supporting crowd were most eager to see: 18-year-old nimble attacker, Yeferson Soltedo, scorer of an impressive 12 goals in 21 games in the local club’s recent championship-winning season. The volume was to rise whenever he picked up the ball. Without really getting a clear sight at goal, over the 90 minutes the fleet-footed forward looked the most likely to weave his way through the defence and either create or score a goal.

The other player of note to stand out was the more experienced Luis González, a 25-year-old dribbler who, particularly in the first half, niftily made space and put in the most testing balls.

Nevertheless, though the likes of González and Soteldo attempted to reward the vocal enthusiasm of the home faithful, the opening exchanges were familiarly tepid. It took 34 minutes until a shot hit the target and this came courtesy of the visitors’ Johan Venegas. Some space opened up for the Montreal Impact midfielder on the centre-right and his strike from 30 yards out troubled – perhaps unnecessarily – goalkeeper José Contreras who parried out. Immediately, Venezuela attempted to urge themselves into action and went straight down the other end, though Soteldo’s shot from outside the area went well wide. Around five minutes later, González created and fired the hosts’ first real attempt on goal, following a stepover with a low strike at the goalkeeper from the left of the area.

While the game was lacking in goal-mouth action, it was nevertheless keenly contested, with robust challenges of varying legality flying in. Just two minutes before half time, tensions got the better of Venegas who, to everyone’s surprise, suddenly received two successive yellow cards and was dismissed, presumably for comments aimed at the referee. As one of the most experienced players and likely threats for the Central Americans, his removal was a welcome boost for the hosts, but could they capitalise after the interval?

They tried, they certainly tried. Yet, lacking on-field familiarity and cohesiveness, most attacks in the opening 20 minutes after the restart were engineered by the likes of Soteldo and González creating space and then firing in balls to team-mates who were not always on the same wavelength. Then, in the 65th minute, even more space was afforded to them to make a crucial connection after another of their opponents’ stand-out players, David Ramírez, received his marching orders for a second yellow card.

Playing against nine men, Sanvicente would have known that nothing less than a win would suffice. Yet though his men did enjoy more of the ball and saw larger expanses of inviting green turf, Soteldo’s jinking runs were not punctuated with a finish and a stalemate seemed inevitable. Out of the blue, Costa Rica nearly thwarted this even this underwhelming narrative when, in the 84th minute, substitute Jordan Smith struck optimistically from 25 yards; his shot deflected, looped upwards and was then tipped over for a corner by Contreras.

Complete embarrassment and ignominy averted, Venezuela resumed their assault on Madrigal’s goal. The breakthrough, when it came with barely a minute left on the clock, came out of nowhere and was a gift that infuriated the Costa Rican coaching staff and match reporters alike. From a free-kick on the left, substitute Ángelo Peña whipped in a routine ball that bounced before Madrigal who, haplessly, was unable to catch it; instead, the ball rebounded off his upper body and was immediately headed past him by the alert Ángel.

Thus, in the short-term at least, a critical mauling was avoided and perceptions were rapidly re-assessed. It was the second time Sanvicente had managed Venezuela in Barinas under Sanvicente and the second time he had emerged victorious. However, both were in games featuring predominantly second- and third-string players and, barring further differences between the seniors and the FVF,  hardly any of these are likely to feature in the World Cup qualifiers next month. That is when the real action recommences and Sanvicente knows he needs solutions fast. Ultimately, he can take little from this match into March’s double-header, but he will be hoping he will at least be around long enough to take the likes of Soteldo and Ángel to further international heights.

 

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): Contreras; Faría, D. Benítez, Ángel, Villanueva; Figuera (Acosta, 78′), A. Flores (J. García, 90+4′); Soteldo, Johan Moreno (Ponce, 54′), L. González (Peña, 79′); Blanco.

Costa Rica (5-4-1): Madrigal; Miranda, Acosta, Mena (Smith, 78′), Waston, Francis; Colindres (Cunningham, 56′), Alvarado (Sánchez, 90+4′), Azofeifa (Valle, 76′), Venegas; Ramírez.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Zamora FC 0-3 Montevideo Wanderers – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5 (16 April 2015)

Thursday 16 April 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5

Zamora FC 0-3 Montevideo Wanderers

Estadio Agustín Tovar, Barinas

Goal Highlights of Zamora FC 0-3 Montevideo Wanderers, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 16 April 2015 (Courtesy of YouTube user xpertowinner)

Demoralised Zamora End Campaign on a Familiar Note

Fresh from a 5-0 league drubbing at the hands of lowly Llaneros de Guanare, the Venezuelan champions ended their dismal Libertadores campaign with their sixth consecutive loss – the worst record  of any of the three sides from this nation of perennial underdogs.

Although they were a tad unfortunate to not get anything out of the barnstorming opening-day game against their Uruguayan opponents, judging by the sparsely attended ground, there was little local enthusiasm to see if they could turn them over on their own patch. The match that transpired was to largely dovetail with the atmosphere in which it was played, being largely of little interest to the neutral. This could only benefit the visitors who were actually playing for second place and ultimately succeeded in doing so by taking most of the chances that they engineered, thus finishing above Chilean outfit Palestino.

Though few will have cared at the time, let alone now, Zamora were largely matching their opponents in the first half-hour, with Jhon Murillo running at the defenders and Luis Vargas, amongst others, taking shots from range. However, none of their opportunities were particularly threatening and when the Wanderers took the lead in the 34th minute, those of a fatalistic disposition could not help but feel that the inevitable had arrived. The goal itself was a tap-in by Matías Santos – scorer of the crucial winner in the home tie against Palestino – following a low cross into the goalmouth from Joaquín Vergés. As the half petered out, it was actually Vergés who could have doubled the visitors’ advantage when he was played through a minute before the interval but goalkeeper Edward Ibarbo did well to instinctively put out an arm to deflect the ball over at point-blank range.

The second half began similarly to the first, with Zamora having their fair share of the ball but, largely consigned to fruitless runs on the wings and long shots, rarely creating anything of note. If there was any desire for at least a point it was swiftly lost when the second goal went in after 64th minutes. Receiving a lofted pass from Santiago Martínez on the left flank, Nicolás Albarracín, centrally in the dee, controlled and then clinically struck a perfectly placed left-foot shot into the bottom right-hand corner. The goalscorer, who is still a mere 21 years of age, has been one of the Montevideo side’s best players in this group stage and though he has already experienced a brief spell abroad with Serie B’s Spezia, another foreign foray does not seem out of the question.

Albarracín was to further enhance his reputation by playing a key role in the third and final goal. With two minutes left, he robbed the ball off the dawdling Jordani Abreu some 35 yards from goal, immediately passed to Gastón Rodríguez before inching towards the edge of the area, where he again received the ball and then laid it off for Rodríguez to strike home emphatically. A great bit of teamwork between the two players, both of whom have scored twice in this year’s competition, with all four coming against their beleaguered Venezuelan opponents. Soon after the final whistle was blown, the relatively modest Montevideo club had more reason to celebrate as their place in the knock-out phase had been confirmed following Boca Juniors’ 2-0 victory over Palestino.

Zamora, on the other hand, can take away little from their participation in this year’s tournament. Ultimately, Palestino and Montevideo Wanderers proved themselves to be far from pushovers but, when the draw was made, more than a few Venezuelans felt that the bicampeones would make a decent fist of the fight for second place. Indeed, in last year’s competition they finished just a point off this spot, having recorded wins against more established opposition in the form of Colombia’s Santa Fe and Paraguay’s Nacional. Sadly and yet unsurprisingly, losing key individuals – manager Noel Sanvicente to the national side, midfielder Pedro Ramírez to Sion and top-scorer Juan Falcón to Metz – following their second championship win in May 2014 cost them dearly. To go from pushing hard for a knock-out place to losing every game and having the worst defensive record in the competition (21 goals conceded) is jarring. Given the relatively humble means and stature of this club even within Venezuelan football (their two championship wins are the only two in their history), one can not be confident that they will be making any improvements in the immediate future.

To read more about the shortcomings of their Copa Libertadores campaigns as well as those of their fellow Venezuelan sides, Deportivo Táchira and Mineros de Guayana, make sure you return to this site after the group stage is concluded in its entirety, as there will be an article published. In the meantime, if there is any enthusiasm remaining out there, then look out for the final Libertadores clash involving a Venezuelan side, Mineros de Guayana vs Huracán on Tuesday 21 April, a report of which should also be up on this site soon afterwards.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Zamora FC 1-5 Boca Juniors – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5 (17 March 2015)

Tuesday 17 March 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5

Zamora FC 1-5 Boca Juniors

Estadio Agustín Tovar, Barinas

Video Highlights of Zamora 1-5 Boca Juniors, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 17 March 2015 (courtesy of YouTube user Boca Juniors +HD – TV)

Zamora’s Early Optimism Dashed by Second-Half Turnaround

Despite having left some big names in Buenos Aires, for the second time in six days Boca Juniors put five goals past the Venezuelan champions and thus maintained their 100 per cent record at the top of Group 5. 

Internationally capped players Dani Osvaldo (Italy), Nicolás Lodeiro (Uruguay), Fernando Gago and Agustín Orión (both Argentina) were the most notable absentees, though there was plenty of quality on hand to administer another hiding.

However, despite what the scoreline may suggest, it was not to be all one-way for the visitors as, following a lacklustre opening period, they were to go into the half-time interval a goal down. Indeed, Zamora came out of the blocks displaying far more attacking intent in the opening quarter of an hour than they showed in the entirety of the encounter at La Bombonera.

In the 18th minute, a shot from outside the area by Yordan Osorio was poorly spilled by deputy goalkeeper Guillermo Sara to Jhon Murillo, who instinctively nudged it past him and then ensured it crossed the line. Replays showed that the high-rated 19-year-old – who was returning, having missed the last two Libertadores games due to suspension – aided the ball’s trajectory with the use of his lower arm, something that he seemingly referenced when pointing to it while celebrating in front of the cameras. Afterwards, some Boca players did mount some protests but like those that followed a rather handy goal by their most famous son in the Estadio Azteca in 1986, they were to no avail.

In terms of entertainment, the rest of the half offered very little with Boca struggling to get back into the game and it was actually their hosts who looked marginally the more likelier to score the next goal. Indeed, with just under five minutes remaining until the break, defender Edwin Peraza rose high to head a corner against the crossbar, with the ball then falling kindly for Sara to catch.

For the Argentines, this state of affairs was unacceptable and so changes were swiftly made in anticipation for the second half. Manager Rodolfo Arruabarrena took off both Franco Cristaldo and Fabián Monzon, replacing them with Gonzalo Castellani and Nicolás Colazo – the latter of whom was to be arguably the stand-out player in the subsequent proceedings.

Arruabarrena did not have to wait long to see his charges heed his no doubt stern half-time words as seven minutes after the restart they were level. Chilean international José Fuenzalida – who has been called up for the upcoming friendlies with Iran and Brazil – slid through Juan Manuel Martínez, whose run was not tracked, allowing ‘El Burrito’ to sneak in and niftily dink it over Álvaro Forero. Some Zamora defenders immediately appealed for an offside decision that rightfully was never going to come and this was to be the last time their side displayed any real fight as things were to rapidly descend downhill.

Just a few minutes later, captain Luis Vargas crudely brought to a halt a counter-attack spearheaded by Federico Carrizo and was to receive his second yellow card in quick succession (his second red card in less than 40 days). Capitalising with brutal efficiency on the man advantage, the two Boca substitutes combined from the subsequent free-kick on the edge of the area as Castellani laid the ball to Colazo who struck a low shot through the wall to put his side ahead.

In the 71st minute, Colazo’s left foot was to again make its mark, this time with the goal of the game as from just outside the the area on the left, he struck a fine shot that glided in the air, ultimately soaring into the far corner. 3-1 and no doubt a game to remember for the 24-year-old who, barring a brief loan spell, has spent his entire career on the books at La Bombonera.

A few minutes later, Andrés Chávez came off the bench and within no time extended the visitors’ lead. Jonathan Calleri nudged him through and, as was becoming frequently the case for many on his side, found himself free with no one near him. He thus strode towards the area where Forero came far off his line only to see the ball duly slid around him into the goal. Chávez, a promising player who was embroiled in a salacious scandal last year involving him allegedly sharing a night with a transvestite, has yet to feature so far in the 30-team domestic league. However, this was the second time that he has found the net in this year’s Libertadores – a respectable example of a player taking the chances that are afforded to him, something that unfortunately could not be said about his strike-partner Calleri.

Indeed, though not on the same scale as Dani Osvaldo in last week’s meeting between the two sides, Calleri was to miss at least three presentable chances in this game, two of which followed hot on the heels of Chávez’s goal. Nevertheless, at just 21 years of age and having already scored a remarkable chip in the league this season, Boca fans will surely maintain faith that he will be able to improve his composure when in scoring positions in the future.

The fifth and final goal of this rout came with virtually the final kick of the match as Marcelo Meli drove forward inside the area before chipping a short ball into the centre where Martínez was afforded the space to hit an acrobatic bicycle kick into the back of the net.

By the time the final whistle had blown, some Zamora fans had already left, with others, irrespective of the calibre of the opposition, staying to voice their anger at their team. The first-half performance seemed to offer them the very viable possibility of a famous victory being secured here, but that optimism was to be rapidly crushed as it became evident that their illustrious visitors had simply not been utilising all their available gears.

Four defeats out of four then for Zamora and now six points away from second spot with a dismal goal difference of -11, the Venezuelan league leaders can consider themselves out of the competition. They will be playing for pride in their two remaining games against Chile’s Palestino and Uruguay’s Montevideo Wanderers. Boca, by contrast, are looking unstoppable – even if the draw has been generous to them – with this game demonstrating that they have a big enough squad to continue to rest players in their last two group matches and still gain positive results.

Nevertheless, while this year’s Copa Libertadores has certainly highlighted the shortcomings of the Venezuelan domestic game, for further updates on their representatives – Zamora FC, Deportivo Táchira and Mineros de Guayana – please check back here.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical