Tag Archives: Carlos Queiroz

Iran 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (20 November 2018)

Venezuela concluded their rare foray into the Asian continent on the neutral territory of Qatar. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides a match report of their latest friendly outing…

International Friendly

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran 1-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Iran 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 20 November 2018 (YouTube)

La Vinotinto Leave Asian Tour Undefeated

Rafael Dudamel’s much-changed side ended 2018’s late run of six away games with their second consecutive draw.

Contested by two sides seeking to try out new players and approaches, it was not a flair-filled end-to-end thriller, but it did nevertheless contain several significant moments.

The first of these came after nine minutes when an Irani cross found Sardar Azmoun inside of the six-yard box. Unmarked, a goal seemed certain, yet his effort from point-blank-range was miraculously diverted over the bar by the renowned prospect Wuilker Faríñez.

In the following exchanges, goalmouth action was to be in short supply, with Venezuela’s sole effort coming from an untroubling shot on the spin from Josef Martínez. That is, until the 35th minute when captain Tomás Rincón slid a ball forward that was latched onto by the left-sided Darwin Machís; in turn, the Udinese attacker cut onto his right and struck a low effort that creept under the dive of the goalkeeper.

La Vinotinto were now ahead, but they had to be on their toes. Just two minutes later following a defensive giveaway, Faríñez was again called upon, this time to parry a well-hit, though relatively comfortable, strike from Ali Gholizadeh. However, three minutes before the break the Charleroi man had more success, after the ball was robbed off Rincón and knocked into his path. From here, the forward gained space away from centre-back Jhon Chancellor and, from the edge of the area, fired clinically with his left boot past Faríñez.

Going into the break level boosted the morale of Carlos Queiroz’s men and, upon the restart, surely aided them in being much quicker out of the blocks. They were certainly more alert than right-back Ronald Hernández, who in the 49th minute was mugged of the ball by Medhi Taremi, who marched on the Venezuelan goal, but this one-on-one was once again blocked by Faríñez. Then two minutes later, a major setback appeared on the cards as Taremi was brought down in the area by Chancellor and the referee pointed to the spot. However, after consulting the pitch-side VAR monitors, the decision was reversed and Venezuela could breathe a little easier.

Subsequently, the South Americans managed to quell opposition danger with greater success and in the 64th minute, they momentarily thought that they had retaken the lead. Here, a ball suddenly found its way to the feet of Josef Martínez, who made room for  himself away from the goalkeeper and fired home, but alas, the linesman’s flag was up.

As also occurred against Japan last Friday, the game was to then suffer under the bloated weight of a high number of substitutions. However, after this lull, two more chances were created, with each being struck by Venezuelan replacements. First, in the 84th minute, Salomón Rondón took a ball in his stride and fired it across goal, causing the goalkeeper Amir Abedzadeh to pull off a decent parry. Then, two minutes from time on the inside-left within the area, Real Salt Lake’s Jefferson Savarino received a threaded ball from Luis González. Although at a slight angle, he was alone with the goalkeeper, rapidly controlling before firing, but to the frustration of a team-mate in the middle his shot went wide of the mark.

Even though he was offside, it seemed like an eminently scoreable scenario, but ultimately Dudamel’s men had to settle for another draw. On the balance of play, this was probably the fairest result and with an overall record for 2018 of two wins, two draws and two defeats, the manager can’t be too displeased. Still, he will know better than anyone that the present cycle has really only just begun and even just consolidating the team’s current level will be a task that will require negotiating with care. Indeed, at the time of writing, he will most likely have to wait until March to have another look at his full squad. In the meantime, it remains to be seen how the players will progress at their clubs and what, if any, bearing the performances of the latest Under-20 crop in the upcoming Sudamericano tournament will have on his thinking.

Team Selections

Iran (4-3-3): A. Abedzadeh; R. Rezaeian (S. Moharrami, 74′), M. Khanzadeh, S. Hosseini, M. Mohammadi; S. Ghoddos (M. Soleimani, 74′), O. Ebrahimi, V. Amiri (M. Torabi, 65′); A. Gholizadeh (S. Dejagah, 74′), S. Azmoun, M. Taremi (K. Rezaei, 81′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, W. Ángel, B. Añor; J. Moreno; S. Córdova (J. Murillo, 74′), Y. Herrera (J. Savarino, 61′), T. Rincón,  D. Machís (L. González, 81′); J. Martínez (S. Rondón, 74′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Iran 1-0 Venezuela – International Friendly (13 November 2017)

10am in Caracas, 3pm in Nijmegen, 5:30pm in Tehran. On a Monday. For those who were otherwise occupied, here is what happened…

International Friendly

Monday 13 November 2017 – Goffertstadion, Nijmegen, Gelderland, Netherlands

Iran 1-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Iran 1-0 Venezuela, International Friendly, 13 November 2017 (YouTube)

Goalkeeping Error Leads to Marginal Defeat for Spirited Venezuela

Due to a second-half goalkeeping error, Venezuela’s six-game unbeaten run came to an end in what was otherwise a decent run-out for Rafael Dudamel’s youthful side.

Though it was reported as being played behind closed doors, some pockets of Iranian fans were present in the largely empty Goffertstadion, home of Dutch side N.E.C. Nijmegen. No Venezuelan spectators could be spotted, with instead the miniscule number of domestic followers with an interest in this friendly watching an Iranian broadcast online, Venezuelan television channels having opted not to transmit the clash.

In the opening exchanges, it was the supporters of the Middle Eastern World Cup qualifiers – some of whom displayed an image of manager Carlos Queiroz – who were given more to cheer about. Within a minute, their side nearly scored as a cross bounced in from the right, but Reza Ghoochannejhad’s touch lacked the requisite deftness and instead the ball sailed over from close range. Subsequently, the Iranians saw more of the leather sphere and looked sharper, playing in testing crosses and hitting shots that admittedly, if they did creep through the crowded area, caused no real difficulty for goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez.

Though on the backfoot to begin with, Venezuela did gradually come into the game and fashioned several attempts of their own. Firstly, in the 13th minute, Málaga midfielder Juanpi – playing his first international game since October 2016 and who was his side’s leading threat in the first half – knocked a ball forward to captain-for-the-day Salomón Rondón. The West Brom forward then spun on the edge of the area but his left-footed strike comfortably cleared the bar. Two minutes later, Yangel Herrera slid the ball to Juanpi outside the area, who fired a decent shot that the goalkeeper Alireza Beiranvand saved low. Midway through the first half, Juanpi had another opportunity when he struck a left-footed effort from just outside the area on the inside-left. However, though it was well-hit, it went a few yards wide of the far post.

Later on in the 31st minute, Salomón Rondón caused some sudden panic when, from some 30 yards out on the inside-right, he whacked an impressive left-footed shot a mere yard over the woodwork. Then, five minutes later, Venezuela came the closest to scoring than they would in the entire game. Here, Juanpi’s long-distance free-kick was poorly punched by the goalkeeper, leading to the ball being knocked into the path of left-back Rubert Quijada. Despite the inviting scenario, his instinctive first-time strike arrowed directly at the head of defender Morteza Pouraliganji, who cleared off the goal-line.

Though La Vinotinto occasionally asserted themselves in this manner, Iran still saw plenty of the ball and had a few further moments of note. In particular, in the 25th minute, a cross came over from the right and Ashkan Dejagah struck a fine left-footed cross-shot which narrowly evaded a team-mate in the goalmouth as well as the far post. Also, a couple of minutes before the interval, Ramin Rezaeian put in a very dangerous ball from the right. Had Vahid Amiri attempted to make decisive contact first-time, instead of taking an awkward touch on his chest which gifted the ball to Fariñez, he could well have scored.

To begin with at least, perhaps due in part to five substitutes being made at half-time (two for Venezuela, three for Iran), the opening minutes of the second half were a little more reserved. Darwin Machís’ run and low saved shot for La Vinotinto was the only real effort before a series of efforts up the other end, the goal-frame of which was now being occupied by José Contreras.

Indeed, first, in the 55th minute, he pulled off a sensational save when a corner was headed down from close range and he was able to instinctively turn the bouncing ball over his own crossbar. Then, within a minute of this, a nodded effort from Ghoochannejhad did bypass him, though this was ruled out for offside. However, soon afterwards in the 57th minute, his own head must have deserted him as he manically ran out of the area on the inside-right in order to intercept a through-ball. To his embarrassment, he was beaten by Amiri who passed it into the centre where Alireza Jahanbakhsh was able to tap the ball into an unguarded net. 1-0 to Iran.

Dudamel’s largely cautious approach of absorbing pressure, seeking to counter on the break as well as generally wear down the wherewithal of their opponents often looks and feels a little precarious. Today, with their otherwise commendable rearguard breached, the onus was suddenly on them to make the running up the other end. At first, they struggled, with the next chance of note falling to the Iranians as a long ball found substitute Sardar Azmoun just outside the area on the inside-left; though his shot dipped into the side-netting, it was a mark of his confidence that he attempted such a strike in the first place.

However, ultimately, though they also had to fend off some crosses and block various attempts, Venezuela were to see out the last 20-25 minutes with more moments of note than their opponents. The man primarily responsible for this shift in complexion was Juanpi’s 58th-minute replacement, Yeferson Soteldo, one of five 2017 Under-20 World Cup finalists to participate in the match. The Chile-based dribbler often galvanised his team-mates and spearheaded moves with his jinking runs. Ten minutes after his introduction, he weaved some magic on the left before crossing into the area, though Rondón’s header, from an awkward position, went harmlessly wide. In the 83rd minute, Soteldo had his best moment of the game, when he went on a central rampage, played a one-two with Rondón and then struck low from just outside the area, which required a good low stretched parry from substitute goalkeeper Mohammad Mazaheri, earning a corner. Later on, with a minute remaining, he also did well to cut onto his right foot on the edge of the area and force a low save.

Amidst these opportunities, Soteldo and his fellow attacking-midfielders Machís and Jhon Murillo were also involved in some moves which culminated in crosses narrowly evading meaningful contact in the goalmouth. That said, Venezuela’s best other chance came courtesy of Soteldo’s erstwhile Under-20 colleague Ronaldo Lucena, whose 86th-minute deceptively swerving free-kick was well-saved by the goalkeeper, who did well to track the trajectory of the ball and tip over.

Throughout all of this, Iran’s attacking threat was always lurking and they could well have doubled their lead in the 84th minute when Azmoun found himself in some space within the area. However, his low strike was well-blocked by the legs of Contreras.

Alas, when the final whistle blew in the eastern Netherlands, Dudamel’s squad again had to taste defeat, albeit for the first time at senior level in seven-and-a-half months. Still, better here than in a competitive match, they will surely reason. With a few familiar faces missing and the next friendly encounter not likely to take place until over four months from now, perhaps reading too much into any outcome was always going to be somewhat futile. Performances and the adaptation to the coach’s methods are surely what is paramount and, with some of the next generation impressing and the defeat against World Cup-calibre opponents occurring due to a hasty error by a back-up goalkeeper, Dudamel can not be too disappointed with his Dutch day out.

Team Selections

Iran (4-3-2-1): A. Beiranvand (M. Mazaheri, 46′); R. Rezaeian, M. Pouraliganji, J. Hosseini (O. Ebrahimi, 61′), E. Hajsafi; S. Ezatolahi (A. Imani, 46′), Ali Karimi, A. Dejagah (S. Ghoddos, 46′); A. Jahanbakhsh (K. Rezaei, 61′), V. Amiri; R. Ghoochannejhad (S. Azmoun, 61′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): W. Fariñez (J. Contreras, 46′); R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, W. Ángel, R. Quijada; Y. Herrera (A. Blondell, 87′), A. Figuera (A. Romero, 46′); J. Murillo, Juanpi (Y. Soteldo, 58′), D. Machís (R. Lucena, 75′); S. Rondón.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical