Tag Archives: Carlos Rivero

Racing de Avellaneda 3-2 Deportivo Táchira – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 8 (14 April 2015)

Tuesday 14 April 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 8

Racing de Avellaneda 3-2 Deportivo Táchira

 Estadio Presidente Juan Domingo Perón, Avellaneda, Buenos Aires

Goal Highlights of Racing de Avellaneda 3-2 Deportivo Táchira, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 14 April 2015 (courtesy of YouTube user xpertowinner)

Rare Venezuelan Optimism Cruelly Dashed Following Late Blunder

Despite already being out of this year’s Copa Libertadores, Venezuela’s Deportivo Táchira nearly pulled off a shock victory against the Argentine champions but were to ultimately be denied by a comeback painfully completed at the death.

Given the significance of seeding in the draw for the knock-out phase and the fact that the hosts had yet to confirm their position at the top of group, they certainly had good reason to go for victory here in their final group game. However, perhaps their 5-0 demolition of their opponents in San Cristóbal back in February was a little too fresh in their memories as while they enjoyed much of the ball in the first half, clear chances were in short supply. Indeed, although Iván Pillud on the right and, more centrally, the likes of Washington Camacho, Óscar Romero, Diego Milito and Gustavo Bou, played the ball around a lot in the final third, they tended to either lack the killer pass or were blocked off by a wall-cum-gauntlet of Táchira players. The closest they came in the first half-hour was when the competition’s top-scorer Bou was played through on 18 minutes but goalkeeper José Contreras raced out to block him off. He was, in any event, offside.

Despite the general flow favouring the group leaders, the humble visitors still managed to make their presence known in the early stages, gaining free-kicks in promising positions and enjoying attacks down the flanks led by Yohandry Orozco and José Alí Meza. It was to be the latter, who has started less than half of his side’s league games and is more often used as an impact substitute, who opened the scoring after 30 minutes. To everyone’s surprise, not least that of the player who had hitherto only managed to find the net in the Copa Venezuela, he profited from some slack marking around the halfway line. He gained some space, dribbled down the inside-right channel while holding off two defenders, before completing what amounted to a 360-degree turn and striking home from the edge of the area.

This most certainly was not in the script. Though it should have served as a wake-up call for the hosts, little changed in the immediate aftermath. Their first real chance to get back in the game occurred in the 37th minute when a cross from Romero on the right reached Milito on the stretch at the back post but he was in such an acute position that he could only head into the side-netting. Their next effort of note was their best of the half and occurred just before the break. Bou received a pass on the right within the area and slapped a fine shot low across goal that Contreras did well to tip onto the far post. The ball rebounded out, narrowly avoiding an attacker, with the Venezuelans just about escaping and heading into the break with their unanticipated lead in tact.

While half-time for both sides must have involved drastically contrasting team-talks, these no doubt required rapid re-thinks less than five minutes after the restart. Incredibly, following on from a pass by César González, Meza managed to find the net again, nimbly evading a challenge before striking home a low effort at Saja’s near post to make it 2-0. Even though Táchira were effectively playing for nothing and Racing’s position in the group made their attitude towards the game questionable, the Venezuelans were nevertheless in dreamland. Leading the full-strength Argentine champions by two goals on their own turf is certainly not to be sniffed at and even taking into account the caveats, this was shaping up to be one of the finest Venezuelan moments in the Copa Libertadores.

Alas, it was not to be. The fightback began in the 58th minute when the widely admired strike-force of Gustavo Bou and Diego Milito combined, with the former receiving a diagonal ball then hitting a cross into the goalmouth for the ex-Inter Milan marksman to tap in.

With their lead halved, manager Daniel Farías soon made changes, the first of which was the surprising replacement of Meza with the less mobile Uruguayan forward Pablo Olivera. Not only had Meza scored twice in what was arguably the game of his life, but by chasing long-range balls and dribbling at the opposition’s back line, he was often playing a leading role in relieving the strain on the defence. With his withdrawal went such moments.

Instead, Racing ramped up the pressure, pitching their tents in the Venezuelan half. In the 67th minute substitute Brian Fernández must have rattled some nerves as much as he shattered the crossbar with a ferocious strike from 25 yards that was hit with such velocity that it rebounded well over 30 yards away from the goal. Denied, but not for long as three minutes later Bou drew his team level. A combination of opposing players headed on a corner to the competition’s top scorer and following a low strike at the near post, he increased his tally to seven goals in six matches.

With twenty minutes still left on the clock and the momentum with the hosts, Táchira were to offer very little going forward, content instead to aim for the reduced glory of a draw. As time wore on, Farías enhanced his reputation for unadventurous and unpopular substitutions, firstly taking off César González, who played the crucial passes that led to both goals and replaced him with 37-year-old Jorge Rojas. Then, with a couple of minutes left, top scorer Gelmin Rivas came on for pacey Yohandry Orozco, who had been playing a role not entirely dissimilar to that of Meza and who was also taken off in an earlier Libertadores game with Club Guaraní to widespread dismay.

Nevertheless, when the 90-minute mark was reached, the game was still 2-2 and owing to a combination of the resilience of the visitors and the lack of urgency of the hosts, Racing had not done much to further threaten the opposition goal. However, just seconds later, disaster struck. On the edge of the area, Fernández dipped a shoulder and quickly got a shot away that should have been comfortable for Contreras. However, to what will be the goalkeeper’s eternal horror, he did not get enough of his body behind the ball and it went under him, trickling agonisingly over the line. Racing, in little over half an hour, had completed the turnaround whereas Táchira, having done so well to confound expectations, ultimately were to go away empty handed and, particularly in the case of Contreras, permanently scarred.

Thus ended the 2015 Copa Libertadores campaign of Deportivo Táchira. Despite impressively qualifying for the competition following an aggregate win over solid Paraguayan outfit Cerro Porteño, they were to underwhelm in the group stage, gaining just three draws and no victories from their six games. Quite where this leaves Daniel Farías remains to be seen as, despite being under pressure after a dreadful 11th-placed finish in the Torneo Apertura, they are currently second in the Torneo Clausura and, with a handful of games left, could well emerge victorious.

A more thorough look at Táchira’s shortcomings should appear on this website soon after all three Venezuelan sides have completed their group matches so be sure to either check back here and/or follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter to find out about that and much more.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Deportivo Táchira 0-0 Sporting Cristal – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 8 (8 April 2015)

Wednesday 8 April 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 8

Deportivo Táchira 0-0 Sporting Cristal 

Polideportivo de Pueblo Nuevo, San Cristóbal

Highlights of Deportivo Táchira 0-0 Sporting Cristal, 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 8, 8 April 2015 (Video courtesy of YouTube user xpertowinner)

Táchira Bow Out as Cristal’s Fortunes Hang in the Balance

In their penultimate group game, Deportivo Táchira’s elimination from this year’s Copa Libertadores was confirmed following a relatively uneventful encounter with Peruvian champions Sporting Cristal. 

Without getting a real opportunity on target, it was the visitors who edged the first half, often looking to attack from the flanks, with left-back Alexis Cossío – who recently featured at the Under-20 South American Youth Championship – delivering the bulk of the crosses. The closest they came to a goal occurred in the 30th minute as a free-kick delivered by Argentina-born Horacio Calcaterra was headed by Irven Ávila at the backpost past goalkeeper José Contreras, necessitating a desperate hooked clearance on the line by Carlos Rivero.

By contrast, the hosts were more reliant on long balls, pumping them upfield to be chased by the likes of Pablo Olivera who, to the increasing irritation of the home fans, was to often find himself in offside positions. However, their best opportunity, which arrived in the 38th minute, came via a more direct route as Yohandry Orozco – who impressed so much last time out that boos greeted his removal from the field – dribbled up the inside-right towards the area. Yet, the lack of threat offered by Táchira in this period was exemplified by the outcome of this attack as Orozco’s left-footed shot was struck without venom and thus comfortably saved by erstwhile Burnley goalkeeper Diego Penny.

A small mercy was to be afforded to the spectactors inside the ground – which, in marked contrast to the full house for the first home game against Racing, was well under half its capacity – as the second half was to be marginally more entertaining. The majority would have been pleased to see the hosts enjoy the greater of the chances and, to some extent, change tact with more opportunities being derived from the runs of the likes of Orozco and, latterly, substitute José Alí Meza.

Their best chances were to come in quick succession with the half barely five minutes old. Firstly, having had another run abruptly halted by Cossio, Orozco won a free-kick on the edge of the area, which he himself curled over the wall only to see it rebound straight back off the post. Subsequently, the ball fell to Olivera who instinctively knocked it past Penny yet, once again, he was standing in an offside position and thus the goal was ruled out. Just a minute later, Orozco was to find himself over on the left, from where he ran past a defender and slid the ball low across the area to Olivera yet, from a hugely advantageous position, the Uruguayan striker was to squander what was a golden opportunity by tapping the ball wide.

Throughout the rest of this half, Orozco was to continue to spread uncertainty amongst the Cristal back line and Olivera was to find himself offside time and time again before being substituted, but the chances that occurred at the opening of the half were to remain the hosts’ best. The Peruvians, though less successful from the flanks in this period, were to gradually recover from the early threats and had their best overall chance in the 69th minute. This came following a cross from the right that was struck sweetly on the volley in the centre by substitute Renzo Sheput, from which Contreras, with little time to think, managed to pull off a superb one-handed save on the stretch.

In the remaining 20 minutes of regulation time, while both sides continued their forward forays, aside from the odd half-chance and, in the case of the visitors, a half-hearted penalty shout, neither was to seriously threaten the opposition goal. However, following a last-minute red card for Cristal substitute Edinson Chávez, one final opportunity to win the match was to be had, though despite the implorations in the crowd, this was not to fall to the hosts. Instead, Sheput, with what was virtually the last kick of the game, curled a swerving left-footed free-kick from 35 yards just inches wide of the post.

With the game ending in a goalless draw, nobody in the Pueblo Nuevo was particularly surprised to see the Venezuelans eliminated. However, while a point against the Peruvian champions is not to be sniffed at, they may feel an opportunity to claim the first victory in this year’s group stage for their country was missed. As their final opponents, leaders Racing (9 points), are not yet confirmed as the top dog in the group and so are unlikely to field a weakened side, nobody will be expecting Táchira to be the Venezuelan side to rectify this sorry state of affairs next week. By contrast, Sporting Cristal (6 points) will have significantly more to play for in their home tie against Guaraní (8 points), as both know only one can reach the knock-out stage.

Nevertheless, though it has been a rather forgettable year for Venezuelan teams in this year’s Copa Libertadores, for those who are still curious to see if any of them (Zamora and Mineros de Guayana, as well as Deportivo Táchira) can gain that as-yet-elusive win, be sure to continue checking back on this site and/or on @DarrenSpherical.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical