Tag Archives: Ecuador 2017

Uruguay 3-0 Colombia (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 3, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 5 February 2017)

The second game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 3 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw Uruguay face Colombia. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

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(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 3-0 Colombia

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 5 February 2017 (YouTube)

Uruguay booked their place at the U-20 World Cup with a comfortable victory against Colombia. They had the bulk of the chances and first took advantage of one in the 41st minute when Facundo Waller dinked an effort over the goalkeeper from outside the area. The second goal came in the 65th minute when striker Nicolás Schiappacasse clinically finished off a fine move. Colombia’s best chance of note came just over five minutes afterwards but this was squandered and thus, five minutes after a red card was awarded to Cafeteros’ Jhon Balanta, Uruguay put the result beyond doubt in the 83rd minute. Indeed, Nicolás De La Cruz was fouled in the area and then picked himself up to make it 3-0 with his spot-kick. Thus, Uruguay will be off to South Korea in May and currently lead this competition handsomely with a 100 per cent record after three Hexagonal games.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) again shone and the rumours of Barcelona watching him appear entirely plausible to anyone who has seen him during this tournament. He scored his third goal of the competition with an 83rd-minute penalty which sneaked in off the post and he also had at least a couple of other attacking moments of note in the game. For example, in the 33rd minute, from a second opportunity to do so, he put in a perfect cross for Carlos Benavidez (No. 8, Defensor Sporting), yet from barely four yards out the latter headed over. Later on in the 59th minute, De La Cruz set up another great chance, this time from the right as he slid the ball to Agustín Canobbio (No. 19, Fénix) who struck from an angle inside the area, though saw his shot parried.

Subsequently, the ball fell to Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) who perhaps should have scored, but instead sliced his shot over. However, he had at least already managed to get on the scoresheet when he got the opening goal after 41 minutes; here, Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors, Argentina) slid Waller the ball on the edge of the area and, benefiting from a slight bobble, he scooped a strike over the opposition goalkeeper to make it 1-0.

The second goal after 65 minutes was a fine team move involving many of the players mentioned so far. Indeed, on the halfway line, De La Cruz helped the ball on to Bentancur who, in turn, gave it to Canobbio some 30 yards out. He played in Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid) on the left side of the area who did well to first control with his left, then clinically strike home with his right boot to make it 2-0.

Schiappacasse also had a role in Uruguay’s first opportunity of the game in the third minute, dinking back a pass to Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) into the area, but the latter’s effort from an angle ended up in the side-netting. However, not too long afterwards, Amaral did create a couple of opportunities for team-mates, first of all Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) from a fine 11th-minute free-kick, though the latter didn’t make a proper connection with his header and it went over. Then, in the 19th minute, Amaral slid forward a nice pass for Bentancur, yet despite being around the edge of the area and managing to gain space from his marker, his shot was fired over the bar.

colombia Colombia

Perhaps it was the deflation of losing in the last minute against Argentina that affected their performance here but Colombia never really got going and hardly created any chances of note.

17-year-old golden boy Juan ‘El Cucho’ Hernández (No. 10, América de Cali, on loan from Granada, Spain) perhaps had his side’s best chance, though this didn’t occur until the 71th minute. Previously, he had managed one of very few other attempts when, in the 51st minute, he controlled the ball inside the area before striking comfortably wide. The effort with 19 minutes was somewhat more substantial, with Kevin Balanta (No. 8, Deportivo Cali) dancing past some opponents before sliding the ball to Hernández on the left inside the area, but alas, he struck his shot hard into the side-netting when the circumstances demanded a goal.

The low possibility of Colombia getting back into the game wasn’t helped by the red card awarded to Jhon Balanta (No. 18, Universitario Popayán) with 12 minutes remaining. They did, however, have one last shot in stoppage-time when Ever Valencia (No. 13, Atlético Bucaramanga) took aim from 25 yards out but alas, the Uruguayan goalkeeper did well to parry wide.

Thus, Colombia must regroup, though with just one point from three games, their World Cup qualification prospects are not looking promising.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 3 were Brazil vs Venezuela and Ecuador vs Argentina – talent-spotting articles have now been published for both of these matches.

Otherwise, Matchday 4 of the Hexagonal will be on 8 February 2017 and the games shall be Ecuador vs Colombia, Uruguay vs Venezuela and Brazil vs Argentina – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Brazil 1-0 Venezuela (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 3, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 5 February 2017)

The first game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 3 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw Brazil play Venezuela. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

group5217

(Source: Wikipedia)

Brazil 1-0 Venezuela

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 5 February 2017 (YouTube)

A game that was heading towards a 0-0 draw was enlivened by a last-minute golazo and some subsequent, contentious events. Indeed, it was a somewhat lethargic game of few chances, with the closest to a goal in the first half being Brazil’s Richarlison heading a 19th-minute corner onto the crossbar. In the second period, it was Venezuela’s turn to hit the woodwork, as Yangel Herrera struck a low 30-yard effort in the 68th minute against the post. However, with a goalless draw long seeming likely, Felipe Vizeu had other ideas as he picked up the ball and then thunderously struck home into the top corner from 25 yards out. It was a great goal, though some claim there was a foul in the build-up and not long afterwards, tempers began to flare. Indeed, Brazil’s David Neres clearly punched Josua Mejías, though this went unpunished with instead Venezuela’s Heber García soon receiving his marching orders. After the final whistle, presumably for his protestations, left-back Eduin Quero was also given a red card and manager Rafael Dudamel was seen fuming, as the match officials required protection from the heavily-shielded police.

Talent Spotting

brazilflag Brazil

Felipe Vizeu (No. 9, Flamengo) won Brazil the game with an 89th-minute golazo. Centrally, he gained space from Herrera (by illegal means, according to Tim Vickery) before lashing the ball into the top corner from 25 yards. Previously in the 80th minute, Vizeu had managed to squeeze in a low shot that was comfortably saved and in the 55th minute, he chased a good through-ball from the inside-left, though the goalkeeper got out just about in time to clear.

The person who came close to playing him in here was Richarlison (No. 18, Fluminense), who had Brazil’s best other chance, heading the 19th-minute corner of Matheus Sávio (No. 20, Flamengo) straight against the bar.

Otherwise, the game was hardly choc-a-bloc with chances, with the best other two opportunities Brazil could muster barely worthy of a mention: After 23 minutes, a left-sided cross found Gabriel (No. 14, Lille, France) but his header went hopelessly wide and in the 65th minute, a free-kick from Maycon (No. 17, Corinthians) went over the wall but also safely into the goalkeeper’s hands.

Lastly, David Neres (No. 11, Ajax) was less of a jinking, attacking threat in this game, with his most memorable contribution instead being a late punch that gave Josua Mejías a nosebleed. This went unpunished, with Venezuelans instead soon getting in trouble with the referee, though one wonders what Neres’ new owners Ajax made of this behaviour from their €15 million acquisition.

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Venezuela were perhaps also suffering from some mid-Hexagonal fatigue, though their defence maintained their impressive form and they had looked on course for a very useful point that would have bolstered their qualification hopes for the Under-20 World Cup.

Though neither gave vintage performances, Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) and Yangel Herrera (No. 8, Manchester City) again showed glimpses of why they are Venezuela’s most highly-rated outfield players. However, as nobody really stood head and shoulders above their team-mates, what follows instead is a list of their team’s best chances:

After five minutes, Soteldo curled in a free-kick from the right that Herrera glanced a header from, though this went straight to the goalkeeper. A couple of minutes later, Soteldo did well on the left to gain some space before sliding a good ball over to the right inside the area; from here, Sergio Córdova (No. 23, Caracas FC) struck a low effort that deflected to the goalkeeper. Seven minutes later, Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas, Spain) impressively beat Gabriel for pace on the right, before rolling the ball to Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC); from a central position, side-on from the goal, he struck a decent shot, though it was directly at the goalkeeper. Much later in the 68th minute came Venezuela’s best chance when Herrera picked up the ball some 30 yards out and struck a fine, low, right-footed effort that hit the base of the post before rolling across the goalmouth. Lastly, in the fifth minute of stoppage-time, the boys in burgundy had one last throw of the dice when Soteldo’s free-kick was headed out to a central position 30 yards out; from here, right-back Ronald Hernández (No. 20, Zamora FC) struck a low, testing drive with the outside of his right boot which only went about a yard wide.

Alas, they could not find a way through and succumbed to their first defeat of the tournament. As much as they were right to feel aggrieved about some refereeing decisions, one wonders if the looming first loss also caused some tempers to boil and led to the red cards to Heber García (No. 14, Sud América, Uruguay) and Eduin Quero (No. 3, Deportivo Táchira) – not to mention the post-match fury of manager Rafael Dudamel.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 3 were Uruguay vs Colombia and Ecuador vs Argentina – talent-spotting articles have now been published for both of these matches. 

Otherwise, Matchday 4 of the Hexagonal will be on 8 February 2017 and the games shall be Ecuador vs Colombia, Uruguay vs Venezuela and Brazil vs Argentina – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Ecuador 2-4 Venezuela (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 2, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 2 February 2017)

The third game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 2 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw hosts Ecuador play Venezuela. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

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(Source: Wikipedia)

Ecuador 2-4 Venezuela

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 2 February 2017 (YouTube)

Gaining their first victory of the tournament, Venezuela burst through the floodgates and humbled hosts Ecuador in a very convincing display. In a rather quiet first half, Yangel Herrera opened the scoring in the 40th minute with a fine, if deflected, effort. Half time produced a surprise all-consuming patch of fog, which threatened to halt the game, but thankfully it did not come to that, even if the hosts were soon hoping that the match would be called off. Indeed, within 19 minutes of the restart, they were 4-0 down as, firstly, Yeferson Soteldo converted a penalty in the 53rd minute, then three minutes later Ronaldo Chacón collected Soteldo’s deflected shot and blasted home for the third; lastly, in the 64th minute, Sergio Córdova received Soteldo’s pass and comfortably struck home for the fourth. Late on, Ecuador, who barely managed a shot from open play in the entire game, were able to paper over the scoreline somewhat, with two penalties converted by, first,  Pervis Estupiñán in the 88th minute and then, seven minutes into stoppage-time, Bryan Cabezas. Despite this, the match was Venezuela’s and they can now consider World Cup qualification a serious possibility.

Talent Spotting

ecuadorflag Ecuador

The hosts got forward in the first half but were always thwarted by the opposition defence, who did not allow them to play with their characteristic verve and bustle; consequently, they had no attacking moments worth recollecting. The second half was little better, as they only managed to cause minor inroads when Venezuela were already thumping them 4-0; for example, in the 76th minute when substitute Wilter Ayoví (No. 8, Independiente Del Valle) forced a low parry from his 25-yard right-footed blast. Ecuador may have underestimated their opposition or simply been worn down by the competition as they were barely in this game; they can count themselves very fortunate that they were gifted two soft penalties – scored by Pervis Estupiñán (No. 6, Granada, Spain) and Bryan Cabezas (No. 10, Atalanta, Italy) – to at least improve their goal difference.

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Though Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) may have had some involvement with all four goals, it was nevertheless a fine team performance from Venezuela, as they finally burst out of their shell to not only win, but win handsomely. Before they opened the scoring, the first half had been a rather quiet affair as the Venezuelan defence had done a fine job frustrating and neutering the Ecuadorian attack. Venezuela did not get forward a great deal themselves, however, with their best attempt perhaps coming from a 22nd-minute corner curled in by Soteldo which Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC) headed at the near post into the side-netting.

Nevertheless, in the 40th minute, they well and truly got the ball rolling. Just outside of the right corner of the area, Yangel Herrera (No. 8, Manchester City) received a short pass from Soteldo and then curled a sublime effort over the goalkeeper to give Venezuela the lead – a dozen replays later and it’s still unclear how many of his compatriots watching on are willing to admit that it took a hefty deflection. Into the foggy second half, Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas, Spain) won a penalty eight minutes after the restart and Soteldo stepped up, perhaps doing the sensible thing in the conditions, by simply striking it down the middle to make it 2-0. Barely three minutes later in the 56th minute, Soteldo’s shot was deflected into the path of Chacón, who struck home a fine left-footed effort for his first goal of the tournament. Eight minutes later, Soteldo did some nice work on the left of the area before sliding it over to Sergio Córdova (No. 23, Caracas FC) who also scored his first goal of the tournament with a low, left-footed shot that seemed to wrongfoot the goalkeeper.

Other than the goals, Venezuela didn’t have a great deal of other chances but then, they didn’t need them. In the 19 opening minutes of the second half they blitzed the hosts on their own soil, leading the Venezuelans in attendance to Olé every pass, with their team appearing to have very much arrived as credible contenders at the tournament. In stoppage-time, the fans also began singing their country’s national anthem, ‘Gloria Al Bravo Pueblo’.

However, it was nevertheless disappointing that they managed to give away two unnecessary penalties. The second one was a careless handball from a corner but the first was due to goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) somewhat recklessly colliding with an opponent over a long ball. It’s the second game in a row that the much-acclaimed youngster has given away a penalty and he has now also conceded all three that he has faced in these two Hexagonal games. Given that his tournament began with a notable spot-kick save against Uruguay, one can not help but feel that he is gradually losing some of his lustre.

That said, though it must have been annoying for he and his compatriots to have their goal difference eaten into late on, they have still only conceded four goals in six games – the joint-best in the competition, with Uruguay. Furthermore, things can’t be too bad sitting second in the Hexagonal table with four points from a possible six – expectations, naturally, will have increased.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 2 were Colombia vs Argentina and Uruguay vs Brazil – talent-spotting articles for both matches have already been published.

Otherwise, Matchday 3 of the Hexagonal will be on 5 February 2017 and the games shall be Brazil vs Venezuela, Uruguay vs Colombia and Ecuador vs Argentina – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Uruguay 2-1 Brazil (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 2, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 2 February 2017)

The second game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 2 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw Uruguay face Brazil. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

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(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 2-1 Brazil

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 2 February 2017 (YouTube)

With a stoppage-time winner, Uruguay came from behind to beat Brazil to become the only side in the Hexagonal left with a 100 per cent record. Things had looked quite positive for their opponents in the 23rd minute when a David Neres pass found Guilherme Arana, who slid home past the goalkeeper for the lead. However, Uruguay got back into the match and were to have the majority of the chances; when they did find an equaliser, it came on the hour courtesy of a phenomenal long-range golazo from Rodrigo Amaral. Subsequently, Uruguay searched for the winner and were aided by two Brazil defenders getting sent off: Lucas Cunha in 67th minute and Lyanco in the 90th. Not too long after the second one, Facundo Waller hoisted a ball back upfield which Matías Viña managed to beat the goalkeeper to and dramatically win the game for Uruguay, who sit rather pretty atop the Hexagonal with six points.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

Once again, praise can be heaped upon Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay), who not only scored again but was more involved than he was against Argentina. In the 15th minute, he played through Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid) into the area, though the latter’s shot from a slight angle was blocked out. Another chance was to be created from the subsequent corner as this was played in by Amaral and headed by defender Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) against the top of the crossbar. However, if you want something done properly, then sometimes you’ve got to do it yourself, as Amaral spectacularly demonstrated in the 60th minute to get Uruguay level. After Schiappacasse headed on a pass centrally some 30 yards out, Amaral quickly put the ball onto his left and let rip with a sensational golazo that went in off the far post – he is again joint top-scorer on five goals with Argentina’s Marcelo Torres. This goal didn’t stop him trying to get his team-mates on the scoresheet, however, as in the 70th minute his free-kick found the head of Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors, Argentina), but alas, his effort went wide. Eight minutes later, perhaps a better chance was provided when he slid the ball to Schiappacasse on the left inside the area; the goalkeeper came out and the striker managed the squeeze the ball past him in to the middle, but unfortunately for the Uruguay striker, a defender’s block directed the ball back to the goalkeeper.

Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) was another man who wasn’t short of attempts to both score and gain an assist. His first effort came in the 11th minute when, from the left about 15 yards from the byline, he tried to curl an impossible right-footed shot; to his credit, he got a fair bit of power on it as it dipped awkwardly for the goalkeeper, who tipped over. In the 33rd minute, he controlled a ball on the edge of the area but his shot, always rising, went over. Ten minutes later, Schiappacasse nabbed the ball just outside the area and gave it to De La Cruz who, from the edge of the dee, curled a left-footed shot low that the goalkeeper saved. Much later in the 67th minute immediately after Brazil had suffered their first dismissal, De La Cruz took the subsequent free-kick from an inside-right position just outside the area; he managed to get a wicked bend on it with his right foot, causing the goalkeeper to tip over. Seven minutes later, José Rodríguez (No. 4, Danubio) on the right played a ball towards the area that deflected back to De La Cruz on the edge who whacked a left-footed effort that went not too far over. The last chance of note De La Cruz had was also the one with which he came closest; indeed, in the 86th minute, he won a free-kick about 22 yards out on the inside-right and managed to hit a right-footed effort that came back off the near post.

One other, lesser moment involving De La Cruz was the good work he did in the 75th minute shrugging off a challenge then passing on the edge of the area to a team-mate who had a low shot comfortably saved. This compatriot was Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) who, once again, made some less ostentatious but all-the-same vital contributions. In the 71st minute he struck an audacious effort from 35 yards that dipped tantalisingly, though ultimately down into the roof of the net. However, in stoppage-time he truly came up with some goods as, from the halfway line, he hoisted the ball back to the edge of the area, which found Matías Viña (No. 17, Nacional). Profiting from a dreadfully out-of-place goalkeeper, Viña was able to easily slide home for the win and cause pandemonium amongst his team-mates, both on the pitch and at the sidelines.

brazilflag Brazil

New Ajax-signing David Neres (No. 11, Ajax) had a couple of moments of note. The first one occurred after nine minutes when a team-mate outjumped the Uruguayan goalkeeper to a chipped ball and it fell to Neres who controlled with his upper body before volleying wildly over, when there was only really a defender in his way. However, he made up for this some 15 minutes later when, from a central position, he played a fine left-footed through-ball that Guilherme Arana (No. 6, Corinthians) latched onto and then stroked home to give Brazil the lead. This was the second consecutive game in which Arana scored with Neres playing a role in his goal.

Compared to Uruguay though, Brazil barely had any other chances worth mentioning, with perhaps one minor exception being a 79th minute pass from Lucas Paqueta (No. 10, Flamengo) to Léo Jabá (No. 19, Corinthians) in the area, though his shot from an angle on the right went into the side-netting.

Otherwise, Brazil will be concerned that they will be going into their next game without two of their regular defenders, following the red cards to Lucas Cunha (No. 3, Braga, Portugal) and Lyanco (No. 4, São Paulo). Another worry will be the goalkeeping position, as the usual first-choice Caíque was dropped, presumably for some shaky moments in the preceding game as well as during some others. However, his replacement Lucas Perri (No. 1, São Paulo) was surely to blame for the Uruguay equaliser, as he was hopelessly out of position when Waller’s ball was pumped up to the edge of his area. Thus, a decision has to be made.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 2 were Colombia vs Argentina and Ecuador vs Venezuela – talent-spotting articles have now been published for both of these matches.

Otherwise, Matchday 3 of the Hexagonal will be on 5 February 2017 and the games shall be Brazil vs Venezuela, Uruguay vs Colombia and Ecuador vs Argentina – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Colombia 1-2 Argentina (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 2, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 2 February 2017)

The first game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 2 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw Colombia face Argentina. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

groupstage020217

(Source: Wikipedia)

Colombia 1-2 Argentina

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 2 February 2017 (YouTube)

Argentina gained a last-gasp victory against Colombia to get their qualification plans back on track. Following a forgettable 3-0 defeat against Uruguay, they needed to re-assert themselves as contenders in this tournament and, in ultra-quick fashion, did. Indeed, after just 19 seconds, Marcelo Torres superbly controlled a diagonal ball and then curled it into the back of the net to give his side the lead. Despite this start, the rest of the half was less dynamic though Colombia may feel aggrieved to have had a goal ruled out for offside. However, they were on level terms some 12 minutes after the restart when Juan Hernández managed to head home a knock-on from a free-kick. Subsequently, it wasn’t really until the last twenty minutes that Argentina began pushing with some concerted pressure and they were to be aided by the dismissal of Colombia’s Eduard Atuesta in the 79th minute. Indeed, in stoppage-time they nabbed the win, as Tomás Conechny brilliantly controlled a long ball, then found Lautaro Martinez who cleverly tapped in to make the final score 2-1.

Talent Spotting

colombia Colombia

Once again, Juan ‘El Cucho’ Hernández (No. 10, América de Cali, on loan from Granada, Spain) asserted himself as Colombia’s most important attacking player. In the 24th minute, he was rather unfortunate to have a goal ruled out for offside, though much later in the 57th minute, he was able to legally find the back of the net. Indeed, from a central free-kick dinked into the area, Julián Quiñones (No. 7, Tigres, Mexico) chested it upwards and into the direction of Hernández who beat the outcoming goalkeeper to the ball to head home. Otherwise, he could well have scored again in the 74th minute when he chased the clearance of goalkeeper Manuel Arias (No. 12, Cortuluá) towards the byline on the left, yet despite gaining space from a defender, his attempt to curl in from an angle went wildly over.

Ever Valencia (No. 13, Atlético Bucaramanga) was the man responsible for chipping in the free-kick that led to the Colombian goal. In the first half, he could well have had a direct assist when another free-kick of his, this time swung in from the left, was met by Kevin Balanta (No. 8, Deportivo Cali), though his header glanced wide.

Otherwise, though at times Colombia seemed like they were on top, they didn’t have too many chances, with the pick of the remaining crop being the following: The 4th-minute 25-yard strike of Juan Ramírez (No. 21, Atlético Nacional) went a couple yards wide; in the 47th minute, Leyser Chaverra (No. 15, Universitario Popayán) came striding into the right side of the area before having his left-footed effort spilled low; lastly, in the 50th minute on the inside-left, Ramírez passed to Quiñones, who returned the ball to the former with a fine chest then kick-on-the-turn and he then got a touch to it just inside the area but was unable to convert goalwards.

argentinaflag Argentina

Santiago Ascacibar (No. 5, Estudiantes de La Plata) quickly capitalised on a loose ball and instinctively played a finely-weighted pass to Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors); he, after a mere 19 seconds, took two touches to control and then superbly curl home for his fifth goal of the tournament. However, despite this, Torres was to be of little further threat and was withdrawn on the hour.

Overall, though there were many lulls and little consistency, Argentina’s leading threat was probably Tomás Conechny (No. 20, San Lorenzo). After just five minutes a throw from the right was chested to him on the edge of the area and he struck a left-footed half-volley just a yard or so over the bar. Reflecting Argentina’s lack of ambition throughout much of this game, his next moment of significance was not until the 71st minute. Here, perhaps frustrated at his team-mates, he just decided to strike a left-footed effort from 35 yards on the inside-left; it was hit well but went straight to the goalkeeper. Three minutes later, he played a minor role in a more testing chance as he nodded a Milton Valenzuela (No. 3, Newell’s Old Boys) ball into the path of striker Lautaro Martínez (No. 9, Racing Club). From just outside the area on the inside-left, Martínez let the ball run over to his right boot with which he struck a fine shot that was just about parried wide. However, though this was close, a far better chance would be created in stoppage-time: Ascacibar played an impressive diagonal ball towards the left inside the area which Conechny superbly controlled and then gained some space to put in a low pass to Martínez who tapped home for the win.

Aside from these moments in this somewhat topsy-turvy and often quiet game, Argentina’s other chances of note were, firstly, a 35th-minute shot from Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club) at an angle inside the area which had to be tipped over and, secondly the 83rd-minute strike of Nicolás Zalazar (No. 14, San Lorenzo) from 30 yards that had to be parried into the air before being caught.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 2 were Uruguay vs Brazil and Ecuador vs Venezuela – talent-spotting articles have now also been published by both of these matches. 

Otherwise, Matchday 3 of the Hexagonal will be on 5 February 2017 and the games shall be Brazil vs Venezuela, Uruguay vs Colombia and Ecuador vs Argentina – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Ecuador 2-2 Brazil (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 1, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 30 January 2017)

With six teams having qualified from the initial group stage, the Final Phase – also known as the Hexagonal – of the 2017 edition of the U-20 South American Youth Championship is now under way. The third and final game which took place on Matchday 1 saw hosts Ecuador face Brazil, as they also had done on the opening day of the tournament. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

30117grouo

(Source: Wikipedia)

 

Ecuador 2-2 Brazil

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 30 January 2017 (YouTube)

Due to their own carelessness, Brazil threw away a two-goal lead and could well have ended up on the wrong side of a reversal in Quito. In a ground far less full than usual for the hosts, Ecuador did actually come out of the blocks with intent and could well have been a couple of goals up in the opening several minutes themselves. However, Brazil soon dampened the home expectations when they went ahead in the 15th minute as Guilherme Arana blasted in a rebound. Ten minutes later, immediately after having a header cleared off the line, Brazil made their second bite of the cherry count as Matheus Sávio crossed low for Maycon to confidently strike home. Ecuador did respond with some chances of their own but they nevertheless went in at the break two-down and, in the 23 minutes that followed the restart, it was Brazil who looked more likely to get a third goal of the game. That is, until they conceded a completely unnecessary penalty which Renny Jaramillo stepped up to convert in the 70th minute. Subsequently, Brazil continued their implosion by gifting another ridiculous penalty and this time, in the 78th minute, it was Pervis Estupiñán who confidently dispatched it. Thus, it ended all even, though Ecuador arguably could have won it had another late penalty shout been awarded and/or another late chance converted.

Talent Spotting

ecuadorflag Ecuador

Pervis Estupiñán (No. 6, Granada, Spain) had quite a game, amongst other things clearing the ball off his own goal-line, having a hand in the winning of the first penalty, clearing the ball off his own goal-line for a second time and then, finally, scoring the second penalty. Indeed, regarding his clearances, even if they were both due to him being in the right place at the right time, they nevertheless seem to be a semi-regular feature of this tournament. The first one here in the 25th minute, however, was of debatable value as though he stopped one header from trespassing over the line, barely ten seconds later, he watched on as the ball was crossed back in and knocked home for the second Brazil goal. Nevertheless, even if he was powerless here, he certainly helped his side recover in the second half. Indeed, in the 68th minute, it was his great, incisive long ball from the left which Herlin Lino (No. 9, Barcelona SC, Ecuador) latched onto and was able to draw a wild foul from the Brazil goalkeeper Caíque to win the first penalty. For this, Renny Jaramillo (No. 14, Independiente Del Valle) stepped up and found the back of the net. Six minutes later, Estupiñán was back to contributing at his own end, clearing a Gabriel header off the line. Then, barely 30 seconds after this, Gabriel went from potential hero to actual villain by fouling Lino for a second Ecuador penalty. This time, it was Estupiñán who took on the responsibility and, with consummate coolness, put his nation on level terms with his spot-kick.

The eagle-eyed will have noted that Lino was therefore directly responsible for winning both penalties. Some fans even believe that he should have gained another for his country in the 83rd minute when he was cynically fouled by Luiz with his feet arguably just inside the area, but alas, a free-kick was instead awarded.

Returning to the first-half, Lino did cause some discomfort when a low 28th-minute cross was deflected off an opponent and had to be saved with Caíque’s outstretched leg. However, Ecuador had far better opportunities to score early on and had they done so, the game could have had a very different complexion.

Indeed, within just 15 seconds, Washington Corozo (No. 7, Independiente Del Valle) fired in a ball from the right which goalkeeper Caíque haplessly flung himself at and missed; Bryan Cabezas (No. 10, Atalanta, Italy) managed to make a connection, but his effort hit the post and then rolled along the goalmouth before a scrambled clearance just about ensured that an early Brazilian disaster was averted. However, four minutes later, Ecuador had a second good opportunity when, having moved in centrally from the left, Corozo slid a finely-weighted ball to Joao Rojas (No. 17, Emelec); from a slight angle on the right of the area, the latter struck a decent low shot that Caíque had to stop with his legs.

Otherwise, Ecuador had a couple of other moments of minor note, such as in the 37th minute when Lino slid but agonisingly missed a well-struck low Cabezas cross and, later in the 55th minute, a header from a Cabezas corner that was easily collected.

It was substitute Jordy Caicedo (No. 19, Universidad Católica, Ecuador) who softly headed this half-chance and he was actually to have a more substantial opportunity to score at the death. Indeed, a fine, incisive midfield pass found him just inside the area but alas, with a defender on his case, he was only able to squeeze a limp effort through which the goalkeeper gratefully stopped with ease.

brazilflag Brazil

Perhaps it was the news that his move to Ajax has been given the green light that caused David Neres (No. 11, Ajax) to play as if he were dancing on cloud nine. Indeed, far more so than in any other match at this tournament, he displayed enormous confidence on the ball, some fancy footwork and a real keenness to shoot. He first got going in the 12th minute, when he received a pass from Lyanco (No. 4, São Paulo) on the inside-right and drove a left-footed shot with intent that the Ecuador goalkeeper Cevallos just about got his body behind. Three minutes later, he did well to evade a challenge then whack a low, powerful strike from just outside the area; Cevallos could only parry this out for Guilherme Arana (No. 6, Corinthians) to blast home the rebound to make it 1-0. Then, just a minute before half time, he marched forward, put the ball onto his left and, from a centre-left position, forced Cevallos to parry low his 25-yard drive. In the second half, there were at least several instances of his ball-skills and ability to creatively take on opponents, the most impressive of these occurring in the 62nd minute. Indeed, here he received a pass on the inside-right and then brilliantly took the ball past Cabezas into the area before striking with intent; alas, his shot went narrowly wide and he was denied a memorable goal.

Brazil’s second goal in the 25th minute came mere moments after they had almost scored and the provider of both of these opportunities was the same man, Matheus Sávio (No. 20, Flamengo). His initial corner was headed in the centre but cleared off the line before the ball found its way back to him on the right; from here, he fired in a low ball that Maycon (No. 17, Corinthians) clinically struck home.

Otherwise, aside from the 76th-minute header from Gabriel (No. 14, Avaí, soon-to-be Lille, France) that was cleared off the line, Brazil didn’t create too many other chances of note, but then again, shouldn’t really have needed to. Indeed, their inability to win was down to two clumsy challenges for the penalties, the first by goalkeeper Caíque (No. 23, Vitória) (who had several dodgy moments, which caused certain commentators to label him ‘Loco Caíque’) and the second by Gabriel (immediately after he had nearly scored). As noted, they were fortunate that the referee deemed the 83rd-minute foul of Douglas Luiz (No. 8, Vasco da Gama) to have been outside of the area, as otherwise they would have succumbed to a defeat of uniquely farcical proportions.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 1 were Colombia vs Venezuela and Uruguay vs Argentina – talent-spotting articles have been published for both of these games. 

Otherwise, Matchday 2 of the Hexagonal will be on 2 February 2017 and the games shall be Colombia vs Argentina, Uruguay vs Brazil and Ecuador vs Venezuela – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Uruguay 3-0 Argentina (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 1, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 30 January 2017)

With six teams having qualified from the initial group stage, the Final Phase – also known as the Hexagonal – of the 2017 edition of the U-20 South American Youth Championship is now under way. The second of the three games which took place on Matchday 1 saw Uruguay face Argentina, in a rapid rematch of the two sides’ 3-3 draw nine days prior. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

30117grouo

(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 3-0 Argentina

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 30 January 2017 (YouTube)

Following a 32nd-minute straight red card awarded to Argentina’s Tomás Belmonte, Uruguay went on to comfortably win on what was, in the first half in particular, a rather puddle-laden pitch. Before this game-changing moment, Los Pibes had actually been the more threatening, but just six minutes after the dismissal, Uruguay went ahead following a sensational low, long-range effort from Nicolás De La Cruz. Barely two minutes later, their lead was doubled as left-back Mathías Olivera was played into some space on the left of the area and struck home at the near post. The game was all but over at the break and La Celeste‘s youths effectively killed off any slim hopes of a miraculous fightback when, in the 62nd minute, Rodrigo Amaral ghosted in to head home a cross to make it 3-0. The remaining half-hour was thus the dampest of damp squibs, with the final whistle coming as blessed relief for Argentina, who will surely need a rather strong recovery in order to be within a shout of retaining their title. Uruguay, on the other hand, have put themselves in a commanding position.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

In the 17th minute, Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) curled in a free-kick that Carlos Benavidez (No. 8, Defensor Sporting) at the back post directed goalwards but which the goalkeeper saved. De La Cruz did also look to play in some of his other team-mates but his one outstanding contribution to the game was the opening goal after 38 minutes. Indeed, seemingly out of nowhere, he picked up the ball some 35 yards out, put it onto his right, then unleashed a brilliant, swerving strike, that curled slightly away from the far post before ultimately creeping low and inside of it.

Though perhaps less notable than some of his compatriots in previous games, Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) has quietly impressed in this tournament and actually played a role in the two subsequent Uruguayan goals. In the 40th minute, he was the target of a pinpoint, diagonal ball from Benavidez which he nodded on from the left flank into the path of left-back Mathías Olivera (No. 5, Club Atlético Atenas). He, in turn, took advantage of some very slack tracking followed by some poor goalkeeping before, from the left inside the area, managing to squeeze a shot in at the near post to double his side’s lead. Later in the 62nd minute, Waller was on the right flank and adjusted to put in a bouncing cross with his left which Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) sneaked in to head low to make it 3-0. Regarding the goalscorer, whilst this goal made him joint top-scorer in the tournament with four goals, it must be said that other than this moment, he didn’t do a great deal else of note during the match. Furthermore, as he hasn’t yet lasted a full 90 minutes of any game and appears to be carrying some extra weight (or is it just a case of ‘big bones’?), one wonders if this potential star is fully fit.

Otherwise, goalkeeper Santiago Mele (No. 1, Fénix) made at least a few decent saves, with a particularly notable one occurring in the 28th minute, when he just about got his gloves on a low drive from Torres.

Lastly, a quick mention for Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors), who was on the receiving end of a horrific late studding from Belmonte and, quite probably as a consequence, was later withdrawn, limping off in the process. No word yet on the condition of the Juventus target, though given the quality he has occasionally displayed during the tournament, one hopes that he makes a speedy recovery.

argentinaflag Argentina

Given that, owing to the recklessness of Tomás Belmonte (No. 17, Lanús), Argentina did not have many opportunities to go forward, they can’t really be said to have had any standout players. They did, nevertheless, have some chances in the opening half-hour when they had eleven men on the pitch.

First of all, in the 6th minute, Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club) did well to roam from the left flank into the area before dinking a ball towards the back post for Lucas Rodríguez (No. 7, Estudiantes de La Plata). However, his header looked as if it bounced against the arm of Olivera, yet it was a corner not a penalty that was awarded. Five minutes later, from a free-kick 30 yards out on the inside-right channel, Nicolás Zalazar (No. 14, San Lorenzo) drove a powerful shot that arrowed just a yard or so over. Perhaps the closest Argentina came to a goal occurred in the 27th minute when a cut-back was deflected into the path of Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors); the prolific striker thus shaped to place his left-footed effort low into the corner but was denied by a good Mele save. The subsequent corner was then headed towards Torres at the edge of the six-yard-box, yet by the time that he got his footing sorted out, his attempt was rapidly blocked by Mele.

Otherwise, left-back Milton Valenzuela (No. 3, Newell’s Old Boys) put in several decent crosses throughout the game, even if none of his colleagues made a telling connection.

Finally, the only real chance Argentina had after the sending off came late in the day when Uruguay were about to pack up. Indeed, this occurred three minutes from time when Zalazar put in a fine cross from the inside-right which found substitute Ramón Mierez (No. 22, Tigre), though his header was well-parried by goalkeeper Mele.

Ultimately, after this write-off, Argentina will hope to bounce back and, with eleven men, display more of their attacking abilities; however, Colombia, like virtually all the other teams left in the competition, should prove to be stiff opposition.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 1 were Colombia vs Venezuela and Ecuador vs Brazil – please click to read talent-spotting articles for these encounters. 

Otherwise, Matchday 2 of the Hexagonal will be on 2 February 2017 and the games shall be Colombia vs Argentina, Uruguay vs Brazil and Ecuador vs Venezuela – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical