Tag Archives: El Tri

Mexico 1-1 Venezuela -Copa América Centenario Group C (13 June 2016)

With the group stage complete, Venezuelans are slightly disappointed to have finished 2nd. Who would have thought…?

Copa América Centenario Group C

Monday 13 June 2016 – NRG Stadium, Houston, Texas, USA

Mexico 1-1 Venezuela 

Video Highlights of Mexico 1-1 Venezuela, Copa América Centenario Group C, 13 June 2016 (YouTube).

Corona Thwarts Resilient Venezuela 

Venezuela narrowly missed out on an unprecedented third consecutive Copa América victory, as Jesús Corona’s late strike means Rafael Dudamel’s men finish 2nd in Group C and will most likely face Argentina in the Quarter-Finals.

Up until the 80th minute, it looked as if La Vinotinto were going to defy the odds yet again as they put in a fine defensive performance, soaking up huge amounts of pressure and once more dispelling the myth that Venezuelans lack mental fortitude. The fact that they were facing a Mexico side with nine changes to their previous line-up should do little to undermine their achievement – especially as they themselves had made five, including consigning star man Salomón Rondón to the bench.

In contrast to their other two group games, Dudamel’s charges were quicker off the mark, with the opening goal coming after just 10 minutes. This time, Alejandro Guerra’s free-kick from the left was curled into the area where Christian Santos – making his debut in the tournament – headed the ball back towards centre-back Sema Velázquez. The Portugal-based centre-back, himself fielded instead of Oswaldo Vizcarrondo, was afforded an obscene amount of space to fire home a sensational bicycle kick. This was certainly not what the sea of green in the stands had eagerly paid months in advance of kick-off to see. Yet thrilled though the minority of Venezuelans were at the time, it could not have been long before a few cautious sorts began to contemplate the cliché regarding scoring ‘too early’. Indeed, if they were going to beat El Tri for the first ever time, they knew a lot of defensive work was going to be required.

That said, though Juan Carlos Osorio’s side had more of the ball in the first half, the quality of the chances they created certainly did not reward the voluminous and nerve-jangling support they received. Also, owing to the number of bodies they often committed forward, they were occasionally vulnerable on the break.

Indeed,  in the 22nd minute, a slight fright was provided by one Yonathan Del Valle, who from the left hustled his way into the area and struck a rasping shot which swerved wide of the far post. It was one of a few occasions that the Kasımpaşa attacker was to both remind the hardcore of his abilities as well as introduce himself to thousands, if not millions, of fans who may have missed him first time around. After all, this was a remarkable personal story, as it was the player’s first international appearance for four years, going back to June 2012 when the then-22 year-old was considered a potential star of the future. Yet, just a year ago around the time of his 25th birthday, angered by the subsequent lack of opportunities and being overlooked by then-manager Noel Sanvicente, he resigned from the national team. However, the tables appeared to have turned as while he faces much competition at the top of the field, one suspects that this will not be his final outing in the burgundy shirt.

Returning to the action, though it felt to many Venezuelans that just one error could bring them swiftly back down to earth, Mexico continued to threaten without really making the opposition goalkeeper work too hard. Their opportunities were no more than half-chances, such as in the 34th minute when Jorge Torres crossed in for Jesús Corona whose diving header went straight to Dani Hernández. Or four minutes later when Héctor Herrera’s corner was headed by Héctor Moreno against the arm of defender Wilker Ángel – claims were made, but nothing was given.

When the half-time whistle blew, plenty of Venezuelan fans were left daydreaming about the further kudos from unexpected quarters that three consecutive 1-0 victories would bring their nation.

After the restart, the game continued with Mexico dominating the play and they were to get closer and closer to the target as the final whistle approached. One early notable moment was in the 50th minute when Porto full-back Miguel Layún played a one-two on the left inside the area and slid it along the goalmouth where it looked like it was going to be a tapped in by Oribe Peralta. However, centre-back Ángel once again got himself in the way, this time rather dramatically as his extremely low diving head diverted the ball off for a corner. A fine example of a player putting himself on the line for his country.

There was little respite for Venezuela as in the 57th minute on the inside-right 30 yards out, Corona picked up the ball and struck hard with his left but his shot went several yards wide. Then, just after the hour-mark, Layún from 25 yards out hit a fearsome shot that Hernández simply punched as far away outside of his area as possible.

Three minutes later, a better chance was created as Layún played in a low ball from the left. Rolf Feltscher’s attempted clearance went straight to Jesús Molina who, first-time, instinctively hit the ball and had to watch it trickle agonisingly wide of the far post.

However, just before this moment, Del Valle had managed to get away from his marker to hit a low strike at the goalkeeper and, a few minutes later, his replacement Josef Martínez had a golden opportunity to double his nation’s lead. Indeed, the Torino forward was slid through just inside the area, yet though he had plenty to aim for, he struck far too close to goalkeeper José Corona.

Venezuela were made to rue this miss and were nearly back on level terms in the 75th minute when Herrera’s free-kick in from the right met the head of Diego Reyes. However, Hernández earned plaudits around the globe for his astonishing double-save as he stretched down low to thwart and then, with the goal gaping, also blocked out the rebound whilst on the floor.

Nevertheless, Mexico kept up the onslaught. In the 79th minute Corona embarked upon a fine run on the left, powering through the Venezuelan back-line before striking wide from the left of the area. La Vinotinto survived, though not for long as barely a minute later the tenacious Porto youngster roamed infield from the left before taking the ball directly past four or five players and then blasting home for a sensational equaliser. The Venezuelan rearguard, which up until this point had seemed inpenetrable, was made to look all-too-mortal by this humbling. It was a great moment of relief for the El Tri faithful.

However, though their opponents were on the ropes for the remainder of the game, they did not merely lay down and invite the inevitable. Instead, with just over five minutes left, out of nowhere Martínez chested and teed himself up for an overhead kick, which dipped tantalisingly and had to be parried out for a corner.

Nevertheless, it was generally Mexico who were on the front-foot and with two minutes left, they came close to completing the reversal. This time, a ball was pulled back from the right-hand byline for substitute and fan-favourite Javier Hernández. However, though ‘Chicarito’ had a fair amount of the goal to aim for, Velázquez managed to get in his way and block his shot.

Thus, when the final whistle went, though they no longer had a 100 per cent record in the tournament and had in fact experienced their first draw after 11 consecutive wins, Mexico could console themselves with their first-placed finish. However, if as seems likely, Chile finish 2nd in Group D,  one can not help but wonder if a meeting with last year’s winners is really much of a reward for Mexico emerging victorious from their own group.

For Venezuela, however, just being in the knock-out phase seems like a prize in itself. Also, though they will face some sublime attacking talent, they will have picked up plenty of confidence from the way their players have absorbed so much pressure in the past three games, conceding just one goal.

One can not help but wonder if these strengths will be crucial for La Vinotinto as they enter a stage of the tournament in which, for the quarter- and semi-finals at least, matches level after 90 minutes go straight to penalties.

To find out how Venezuela get on, remember to keep up-to-date with @DarrenSpherical and this website.

Team Selections

Mexico (4-5-1): José Corona; P. Aguilar, D. Reyes, H. Moreno, J. Torres (M. Layún, 46;); H. Lozano, H. Herrera, J. Molina (J. Hernández, 68′), A. Guardado, J. Aquino (Jesús Corona, 18′); O. Peralta.

Venezuela (4-4-2): D. Hernández; A. González, S. Velázquez, W. Ángel, R. Feltscher; A. Guerra (R. Otero, 83′), T. Rincón, L. Seijas, A. Peñaranda; C. Santos (S. Rondón, 78′) & Y. Del Valle (J. Martínez, 65′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

El equipo juvenil de Venezuela sub-20 gana la medalla de plata

(This article was originally written in English. To read it, click here.) britain1 usaflag

Ayer, 28 de noviembre de 2014, el equipo sub-20 masculino de Venezuela recibió la medalla de plata en los XXII Juegos Centroamericanos y del Caribe, quedando subcampeones tras México, la nación anfitriona, que acabaron cómodos ganadores con un 4-1 en la final.

Este resultado supone un contraste con el rendimiento de La Vinotinto en su camino hacia la final, puesto que progresaron habiendo llegado al primer puesto de su grupo tras una victoria de 4-0 sobre Haití, un 1-0 sobre Costa Rica y después un empate sin goles contra Cuba. Posteriormente se encontraron con Honduras en la semifinal y los vencieron 1-0 gracias a un temprano penalti de Jhon Murillo del Zamora.

Aún así, por varias razones, los jóvenes venezolanos no deberían sentirse demasiado desanimados por la final y un aspecto al que se le debe prestar una breve atención aquí es la diferencia de edad de las alineaciones titulares del encuentro. En efecto, sus oponentes no sólo eran el equipo oficial Mexicano sub-21 si no que también había, de media, una brecha de más de dos años entre los dos conjuntos – una diferencia que, en muchas competiciones internacionales, habría visto a los equipos separados y colocados en distintas categorías de edad.

Es bastante notable el hecho de que el venezolano de más edad para empezar, el defensor de Caracas Jefre Vargas (nacido el 12/01/95), es más joven que el más joven de los mexicanos nombrado en la alineación de los oponentes, el jugador del torneo, Jonathan ‘Jorge’ Espericueta (nacido el 09/08/94).

Además, el jugador más mayor en la alineación de El Tri era Erick Torres (nacido el 19/01/93), un hombre que tiene una tasa de 1 gol cada 2 juegos para el equipo de la MLS Chivas USA – donde ha estado como préstamo durante casi un año y medio por el equipo mexicano superior en prestigio – y quien también marcó el gol ganador para su selección contra Panamá en Octubre. Es más de tres años y nueve meses mayor que los dos jugadores más jóvenes que empezaron el juego para La Vinotinto: Jefferson Savarino del Zulia y Andrés Ponce del Llaneros de Guanare (los dos compartiendo la fecha de nacimiento del 11/11/96), el último de los cuales tuvo algunas impresionantes actuaciones y fue el máximo goleador de su equipo con cuatro goles.

Muchas más observaciones se pueden recoger de la información proporcionada en la tabla inferior, pero seguramente la conclusión más relevante que se puede hacer es que el progreso de este equipo juvenil venezolano hasta la final ofrece mucho optimismo para el futuro.

mexvenesp3

Se debe tener en cuenta que todas las edades de los jugadores han sido redondeadas al mes más cercano, dependiendo de su fecha de nacimiento en relación con el partido jugado el 28/11/14. Por lo tanto, si un jugador ha vivido más de 15 días en un nuevo mes, su edad ha sido redondeada. Por ejemplo, José Marrufo, habiendo nacido el 12/05/96 tenía 18 años, 6 meses y 16 días el día del partido y por lo tanto su edad ha sido redondeada a 18 años y 7 meses. Si alguien lo desea es libre de crear una comparación más precisa, aunque es sospechable que el promedio de diferencia entre los dos equipos no cambiaría por más de un mes o así, reafirmando por lo tanto que hay una brecha de aproximadamente dos años entre los dos conjuntos.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Traducido por:

Susana Spherical

Venezuela’s Youthful Sub-20 Team Win Silver

(Si prefieres leer este artículo en español, haz click aquí) venezuelaflag Spain

Yesterday, 28 November 2014, Venezuela’s male Under-20 side were awarded the silver medal at the XXII Central American and Caribbean Games, finishing runners-up to host nation Mexico, who ran out comfortable 4-1 winners in the final.

This result came in contrast to La Vinotinto‘s form on their route to the final as they progressed having topped their group following a 4-0 victory over Haiti, a 1-0 win over Costa Rica and then a goalless draw against Cuba. Subsequently, they met Honduras in the semi-final and defeated them 1-0 thanks to an early penalty from Zamora’s Jhon Murillo.

However, for a variety of reasons, Venezuela’s youngsters should not feel too downhearted about the final and one aspect that shall be given some brief attention here is the age-difference between the starting line-ups for the game. Indeed, not only were their opposition officially the Mexican Under-21 team but also there was, on average, a gap of over two years between the two sides – a difference that, in many international competitions, would see the teams separated and placed in different age categories.

Quite notable is the fact that the oldest Venezuelan player to start, Caracas defender Jefre Vargas (born 12/01/95), is younger than the youngest Mexican named in the opposition line-up, the player of the tournament, Jonathan ‘Jorge’ Espericueta (born 09/08/94).

Furthermore, the very oldest player in El Tri‘s line-up was Erick Torres (born 19/01/93), a man who has a strike-rate of 1 goal in every 2 games for MLS side Chivas USA – where he has been on loan for nearly a year-and-a-half from the more prestigious Mexican side – and who also scored the winner for the full national team against Panama in October. He is over three years and nine months older than the two joint-youngest players who began the game for La Vinotinto: Zulia’s Jefferson Savarino and Llaneros de Guanare’s Andrés Ponce (both sharing a date of birth of 11/11/96), the latter of whom put in some impressive performances and was his side’s top-scorer with four goals.

Plenty more insights can be gleaned from the information provided in the table below, but surely the most signficant conclusion to make is that the progress of this youthful Venezuelan side to the final offers much optimism for the future.

mexveneng2

Please note that all ages of the players have been rounded to the nearest month, depending on their date of birth in relation to the game played on 28/11/14. Thus, if a player has lived more than 15 days into a new month, their age has been rounded up. For example, José Marrufo, having been born on 12/05/96 was 18 years, 6 months and 16 days old on the day of the match and so has had his age rounded up to 18 years and 7 months. If anyone wishes to create a more precise comparison feel free, though one suspects that the average age-difference between the two sides would not change by more than a month or so, thus re-affirming that there was a gap of approximately two years between the two teams.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical