Tag Archives: FIFA 2017 Under-20 World Cup

Uruguay 1-1 Venezuela (AET – 3-4 on penalties) (Semi-final, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 8 June 2017)

The first and last all-South American encounter at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup went all the way to penalties, with Rafael Dudamel’s men sensationally pulling off a breathtaking victory. @DarrenSpherical is tempted to lose the plot right here and now but has been advised to save up some of this caffeine-charged exuberance for Sunday’s surreal, you-couldn’t-make-it-up Final with England – England! Bloody never mind Venezuela, ENGLAND! – where he may be afforded a grander opportunity to really let loose. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, a double-helping of armchair talent-tracking…

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(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Uruguay 1-1 Venezuela (AET – 3-4 on penalties)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Semi-final, 8 June 2017 (YouTube)

Thanks to a spectacular last-minute free-kick and some heart-stopping penalty saves, this remarkable Venezuelan generation inched their way past CONMEBOL rivals Uruguay to incredibly gain a place in the tournament Final.

They started off the game relatively well, enjoying a fair bit of possession and causing some frights. However, as the first half wore on,  Fabián Coito’s men came into their own and took the upper hand, with at least two shots of note forcing saves.

Rafael Dudamel’s charges began the second half in a similar manner to how they commenced the first, yet their momentum was to be suddenly halted when Uruguay were awarded a debatable penalty, for which the referee required the aid of video technology. Undeterred by the hullabaloo, captain Nicolás De La Cruz stepped up to convert to make it 1-0. Soon afterwards, Nicolás Schiappacasse was provided with a very presentable chance to double his nation’s lead, though was denied by Wuilker Fariñez. As the match wore on, Venezuela had to try to overcome their sense of injustice regarding the penalty decision, yet though they created a few half-chances, a defeat was looking increasingly unlikely. That is, until the first minute of stoppage-time when 17-year-old substitute Samuel Sosa curled a brilliantly struck left-footed free-kick into the top corner. Cue bedlam.

The 30 minutes of extra-time were understandably nervy, particularly the second half, with both sides coming close to finding a winner. Indeed, Uruguay’s Federico Valverde appeared to be trying his luck from a variety of positions, which included an inswinging corner that would have crept in at the near post were it not for Fariñez and then, later, striking when a cross had been anticipated from a free-kick, with the goalkeeper just about re-adjusting his footing to save. Up the other end, as the clock was about to run out, Sosa’s trickery resulted in a low ball to fellow substitute Jan Hurtado, who poked an effort that hit the outside of the post.

Alas, it was to be penalties. Here, after Uruguay’s second spot-kick taker José Luis Rodríguez saw his effort saved by Fariñez, Venezuela took a commanding lead. However, when Yeferson Soteldo hit the crossbar with his nation’s fourth attempt and Uruguay subsequently levelled things up, a sudden turnaround seemed possible. Thankfully for all fans of La Mini-Vinotinto, this did not materialise, as first captain Yangel Herrera stepped up to make it 4-3 and then his opposite armband-wearer, De La Cruz, had his effort – his second 12-yarder of the game – saved by Fariñez. The goalkeeper took a few moments to realise the significance of his actions before being mobbed by his team-mates as together they celebrated this penultimate chapter in their history-making campaign.

Talent Tracking

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Despite reaching the Semi-finals, with just seven goals in their six games, Uruguay can not really be said to have been eye-catchingly potent in attack, with consistency certainly lacking in this area. Nevertheless, though he plays a somewhat deep role in midfield, one man who has, on occasion, been a threat during various tournament games – including this one – is Federico Valverde (No. 16, Real Madrid Castilla). Here, his first moment of note came in the 25th minute when his 25-yard central free-kick was struck well and swerved down low, requiring a parry out wide.

However, it was really in the second half of extra-time that he became a frequent source of danger. Indeed, in the 108th minute, he whipped in a corner that nearly reached Carlos Benavídez (No. 8, Defensor Sporting) at the near post, though a defender just about headed it a little too uncomfortably wide. Then, from the subsequent corner, Valverde’s ball almost squeezed directly in though goalkeeper Fariñez did well to recover to block with his leg. Valverde also attempted a completely wayward effort from the halfway line but his last strike of note with a few minutes remaining was far more testing. Here, he again caught Fariñez off-guard as he hit a free-kick from a deep position on the inside-left with his right, shooting for goal instead of going for the anticipated cross, which the goalkeeper was just about able to get over to in order to stop.

One attacker who has certainly had a mixed tournament is attacking-midfielder and captain, Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay). This was encapsulated in this game as he both converted a penalty within regulation time which nearly led to him being heralded as the match-winner and also failed to score the final spot-kick in the shootout, which sent his nation out. This was surely especially hard for him to take as, having embarrassingly seen his opening day penalty in CONMEBOL qualifying saved by Fariñez, he must have felt his first goal here put that particular ghost to bed. Alas, it appears not. Or, at least, not for now.

Otherwise, he didn’t have the most influential of games, though managed to put in a few decent crosses, at least one of which deserved better contact from the recipient. Furthermore, in the 98th minute, from an inside-right position he did well to skip away from a few challenges into the area before passing to Agustín Canobbio (No. 19, Fénix) – who was also the man adjudged to have been fouled for the penalty – who, from a slight angle, struck hard but a bit too close to Fariñez, who gathered after initially parrying.

De La Cruz’s most notable set-up, however, came just after his goal when he picked up a cross from Marcelo Saracchi (No. 6, Danubio) then, from the inside-right of the area, put the ball on a plate for Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid Under-19s). However, despite being barely six yards out and with plenty of the goal to aim for, the striker instead side-footed the ball at Fariñez, who nevertheless did well to instinctively thwart. Schiappacasse was ultimately withdrawn in the 67th minute owing to an apparent knock, though his replacement Joaquín Ardaiz (No. 7, Danubio) was unable to create much more than minor scares amongst the opposition back-line.

Lastly, as the only goal they conceded – just their third in six games – was from a set-piece, some credit must again go to the defence as a whole, which is full of players who could well find themselves receiving bigger moves in the not-too-distant future. Ultimately, CONMEBOL champions Uruguay will be disappointed not to have made it to the Final – and to have been knocked out by another side from their region – but they have shown both here and in qualifying that they possess many players with the potential to remain on the radars of global football fans for some years yet.

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As was implied by the above section, Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) had a fair few shots to contend with, probably the most that he has faced so far in the competition. He will justly go down as one of the two leading heroes of the game, having also saved two of the five shootout spot-kicks and thus further bolstered his penalty-saving reputation.

The other headline-grabber, without whom there would have been no 12-yard duel, is 17-year-old substitute Samuel Sosa (No. 15, Deportivo Táchira). Few were anticipating him to strike the 91st-minute free-kick from the edge of the area but strike it he did, curling a beautiful left-footed shot past Mele and into the top corner for his second tournament goal. He also impressed with some confident touches that belied his age and later on in the 108th minute had a shot from range that was hit well but comfortably saved. Finally, right at the end, he displayed a great piece of skill at the right side of the area, before setting up Jan Hurtado (No. 13, Deportivo Táchira), who nudged an effort against the near post.

Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford) was the man who looked most poised to take the free-kick that Sosa buried though, overall, it was far from his most influential game. Perhaps his best moment came less than a minute into the second half, when he skipped past a player or two before passing the ball to Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC), who hit a snap-shot from inside the area that was deflected not too far wide (20 minutes later, Chacón was to have another shot, a left-footed effort on the turn that was hit well and which Mele had to save low). Later on, in the 58th minute, Peñaranda dribbled past some opponents before striking an effort wide into the side-netting – certainly not a great chance, but it was slim pickings at times for Venezuela.

Otherwise, after having a surprise effort with just 20 seconds on the clock from nearly 35 yards out that Mele had to double-fist over, Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) once again showed what a useful provider of opportunities he is. Indeed, after 13 minutes from an inside-left position, Franklin’s younger brother curled in a fine free-kick though, despite being in a good position, Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira) was unable to make proper contact. Later on the in the 75th minute, he swung in an even more presentable chance from a corner, yet Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC) perhaps stooped a little too much and his misdirected header subsequently bounced over the bar. Then, with three minutes of regulation time left, another Lucena corner was headed over by centre-back Josua Mejías (No. 17, Carabobo FC), who was unable to get his head above the ball.

Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) was once again on the bench but was introduced to the field in the second half. He will no doubt shudder at the memory of his shootout spot-kick rebounding back off the bar, yet though it wasn’t a particularly action-filled game for the diminutive dribbler, he nevertheless had one effort of note. This came in extra-time when he went on a run towards the inside-left edge of the area and received a pass back from Hurtado, before toe-poking a low strike that Mele parried low for a corner.

Lastly, though there were some shaky moments for Venezuela’s defence – committed most notably by both Ferraresi and Mejías – who was playing his first tournament game due to a suspension) – to only concede once in 120 minutes certainly can’t be sniffed at. They have now let in just two goals in the entire competition and, as all observers know, will provide a stern test in Sunday’s Final for England, who themselves have only conceded three goals in their six games. Who really knows how this monumental encounter will go? Venezuela will surely be experiencing some fatigue, having played 120 minutes in their three preceding games – England, by contrast, have concluded business each time within 90 minutes – but, as they have demonstrated in the past two-and-a-half weeks, anything really is possible.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on these two South American sides as they get set to play their final games of somewhat varying significance on the last day of South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Portugal 2-2 Uruguay (AET – 4-5 on penalties) (Quarter-final, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 4 June 2017)

Overcoming an early setback and ultimately requiring the dreaded spot-kicks, Uruguay eventually emerged victorious from their 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup Quarter-final clash with Portugal. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

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(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Portugal 2-2 Uruguay (AET – 4-5 on penalties)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Quarter-final, 4 June 2017 (YouTube)

Uruguay set up a scintillating Semi-final clash with CONMEBOL rivals Venezuela, after seeing off a Portugal side who easily provided them with their most difficult test yet.

Indeed, within the first minute, their Iberian opponents not only took the lead but also became the first team in the tournament to both score against Uruguay as well as put them in a losing position. This occurred when Federico Valverde was dispossessed by Xadas who slid the ball to Xandre Silva to finish off. It took about ten minutes, but Uruguay did gradually find their way into the game, having a few chances which culminated with the equaliser on 16 minutes. Here, a right-footed corner from Valverde was brilliantly whipped towards the back post, which Nicolás Schiappacasse volleyed onto the bar, with the rebound falling to Santiago Bueno, who headed home. For most of the remainder of the half, Uruguay were more than holding their own despite not creating much, yet in the 41st minute they were left reeling by Diogo Gonçalves’ phenomenal right-footed strike from just outside the area on the inside-left which flew into the top corner.

Thus, Fabián Coito’s men went in at half-time behind, though this state of affairs did not last long. Indeed, after the restart, Agustín Canobbio was fouled in the area and in the 50th minute, Valverde struck home the penalty to make it 2-2. Subsequently, though there were a couple of other chances in the match, both teams appeared to have decided from a relatively early stage that this game was heading to penalties – and so it proved.

After eight well-executed penalties, almost every taker’s nerves then crumbled, with first Portugal’s Pepê seeing his sstrike saved by Santiago Mele. Rodrigo Amaral thus stepped up to claim the glory for Uruguay, yet spectacularly blazed his strike well over the bar. Thus followed three consecutive failed spot-kick efforts, before Bueno struck his home with aplomb to book the South Americans’ place in the final four.

Talent Tracking

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Federico Valverde (No. 16, Real Madrid Castilla) had a curious game, yet again made some crucial contributions. Firstly, he was partly at fault for the opening Portugal goal when he was robbed of the ball seconds beforehand, yet 15 minutes later he crossed in the corner that led to his side’s equaliser and later, he both scored the spot-kick to make it 2-2 as well as converted the all-important first one in the shootout. Otherwise, he whacked a conspicuously bad free-kick off-target in the 72nd minute but overall, his positive actions far outweigh the negatives.

Valverde’s potential future El Clásico rival Santiago Bueno (No. 2, Barcelona Juvenil A) also had a game to remember. It is debatable – though, probably a little unfair – whether to apportion blame at his feet or those of centre-back partner Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) for the first goal as they were both caught off-guard by Valverde’s unexpected loss of the ball. Nevertheless, he got himself in the fans’ good books 15 minutes later when he was on cue to head home the equaliser and, especially at the very end, when he put away the decisive spot-kick to win the tie.

Otherwise, the role of Santiago Mele (No. 1, Fénix) will certainly be fondly recalled as, though he conceded his first goals of the tournament – not a huge deal he could have done about either – he also remarkably pulled off three successive saves in the penalty shootout. He’s certainly attracted some attention over the past fortnight, building on a quietly impressive qualifying record.

Overall, despite the four goals, this was not really a game teeming with clear opportunities. Still, some additional attacking impetus was injected when Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional) came off the bench in the 79th minute – taking the captain’s armband off the largely quiet Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) – to make his first appearance since his match-winning opening day cameo. In his 41 or so minutes on the field, he was to demonstrate some of the potential of his exceptional left wand, largely seeking to loft balls into the area as well as play in team-mates.

Indeed, a handful or so of opportunities  – or at least, half-chances – were created for the likes of Rogel and Matías Viña (No. 17, Nacional), with perhaps the most eye-catching being intended for Marcelo Saracchi (No. 6, Danubio) in the 90th minute. Here, he rapidly turned near the halfway line and then hit a great pass with his left peg towards Saracchi, though the midfielder – who also played in some impressive balls of his own earlier in the game – was narrowly beaten to the ball by the goalkeeper.

However, though Amaral showed that, despite injury and fitness concerns, he is still capable of spurring his team-mates on and making things happen, one wonders how he feels following the shootout. Indeed, in rather tragi-comical fashion, for the second Under-20 World Cup in a row this prodigous raw talent missed a crucial penalty. Hopefully for his sake, the fact that, unlike last time, this did not prove to be the decisive kick that knocked his nation out, will at least provide him with some solace.

Lastly, a quick word for striker Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid Under-19s). He had a half-chance in the 13th minute when he bypassed an opponent before seeing his shot from a rather acute angle parried for a corner. More significantly, however, three minutes later he hit the crossbar, with the rebound being nodded home by Bueno and he also had a role in the second goal when he played the ball to Agustín Canobbio (No. 19, Fénix), who was fouled for the penalty converted by Valverde.

Ultimately, Uruguay certainly survived some scares and rode their luck, but managed to progress and thus move one step closer to attaining their goal. Though they will be very wary of the threat posed by Venezuela – the only side to beat them in qualifying – they will at least be able to welcome back Rodrigo Bentancur from suspension for this potentially epic Semi-final.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the two remaining South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela 2-1 USA (AET) (Quarter-final, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 4 June 2017)

Like Venezuela’s preceding encounter, their Quarter-final clash with the USA at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup took 120 minutes to decide, but ultimately Rafael Dudamel’s breathtaking men got what they deserved. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

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(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Venezuela 2-1 USA (AET)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Quarter-final, 4 June 2017 (YouTube)

Though it took them in excess of 90 minutes, Venezuela’s dominance eventually paid off as they sensationally carried their history-making mission into the Semi-finals.

The chances La Mini-Vinotinto created are too innumerable to recall in full, yet as each minute passed with the scoresheet still blank it looked as if it could end up being one of those days. Indeed, within the first minute, they came close from a Nahuel Ferraresi header and also in this half both Adalberto Peñaranda and Sergio Córdova had chances, with the latter actually thinking he had scored in the 21st minute. Alas, his strike was belatedly ruled out for offside.

Just three minutes into the second half, Ronaldo Lucena’s corner was greeted by the head of Ronaldo Chacón though, unfortunately for him, his powerful effort rattled the crossbar. Lucena was to put in more than a few dangerous balls and another of these, in the 61st minute was headed by Córdova, yet again, this rebounded off the bar. Córdova, the tournament’s joint-top scorer with four goals, was to have more – some, rather gilt-edged – opportunities to score in both regulation- as well as extra-time, yet ultimately departed the field without having added to his tally.

Amongst others, Peñaranda also failed to convert a couple of opportunities – one, a particularly galling miss – yet, at the very end of the 90 minutes, both he and Córdova only narrowly avoided going home with guilty consciences. Indeed, at the death, USA had a clear chance to steal the victory yet, despite beating Wuilker Fariñez to a chipped ball from the left, Erik Palmer-Brown’s header went agonisingly wide.

Thus, for the second Venezuela game in a row, a further 30 minutes were required. Having looked destined to squander every chance that they could conjure, even they must have been a little surprised when Peñaranda opened the scoring just six minutes into the first additional half, sliding home substitute Samuel Sosa’s left-sided cross. Later, with just five minutes remaining, their lead was doubled when Ferraresi rose high to head home Lucena’s corner. Game over – or so it seemed. Indeed, barely two minutes later, partly capitalising on some Venezuelan joy-infused slackness, the USA pulled a goal back when Jeremy Ebobisse headed in a Brooks Lennon free-kick.

Nevertheless, though there was a nervy end to the game, Rafael Dudamel’s men could breathe a sigh of relief at the final whistle, which was swiftly followed by some elated celebrations of their astounding achievement of reaching the final four of the greatest competition for their age group.

Talent Tracking
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Thankfully, someone broke the deadlock and, perhaps fittingly, it was to be Venezuela’s best attacker of the tournament, Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford), who did the honours.

Previously, he had been involved in several notable attacks, such as in the 13th minute when his low right-footed shot was parried out wide. Then, in the 24th minute, he played a fine pass to Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas Atlético) whose left-footed shot went only just wide of the post. Later on in the 73rd minute, he had a golden opportunity to score when, from an acute angle within the area, he fired a ball into the goalmouth, where it took three pinball-esque ricochets before returning to him in a promising position with the goalkeeper floored. However, instead of allowing for some composure to lead him through the situation, he instinctively swung his left boot at the ball and was to somehow watch his shot evade the gaping net.

Two minutes from regulation time, he almost had another good chance when Yangel Herrera (No. 8, New York City FC, on loan from Manchester City) played one of several incisive through-balls from largely deep positions that he was to distribute throughout the game. The captain was again to have an impressive game, also helping to ensure that the back four had very little to do over the 120 minutes. Regarding this particular pass, however, almost as soon as it found Peñaranda, a defender was close enough to be able to quickly block the shot.

Nevertheless, the Málaga loanee was not to be denied and, six minutes into extra-time, he side-footed a good left-sided cross from Samuel Sosa (No. 15, Deportivo Táchira) into the back of the net, thus scoring his second goal of the tournament.

Had Peñaranda not scored, one wonders if Venezuela would have made the breakthrough as frustrations were mounting with every miss from their many opportunities – not least following those that fell to Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC). Indeed, he did manage to get the ball in the back of the net after 21 minutes with a low strike, though this was ruled out for offside and. subsequently, the four-goal striker’s composure was to repeatedly desert him as on another day he could have easily bagged a hat-trick.

It was in the second half, in particular, that his crimes in front of the opposition goal were committed. Firstly, in the 54th minute he had a virtually free header in the centre yet glanced it wide. Seven minutes later, he was slid through following a great pass by Herrera, yet despite being practically one-on-one with goalkeeper Jonathan Klinsmann, his low shot lacked placement and was comfortably blocked. A couple of minutes later, he was perhaps unfortunate when he rose well to head powerfully against the crossbar. Then, almost immediately afterwards in the 64th minute, Córdova fashioned a chance of his own from the inside-right edge of the area, curling a left-footed effort a couple of yards wide of the far post.

So many opportunities in what was barely ten minutes of action garnered him some unwanted attention and judgements. Much later on in the first minute of extra-time, he was to have another good chance when Herrera’s superb ball from deep was controlled by the forward yet, before he could pull the trigger, Klinsmann was there to nab the ball off him. Lastly, soon after Peñaranda gave Venezuela the lead, the scorer nearly turned provider when he dinked a fine central ball which put Córdova one-on-one yet, frustratingly, he nudged the ball far too gently at the goalkeeper, with his shot also lacking direction.

Had he put a couple of these opportunities away – the 54th-minute free header and the 61st-minute nod against the bar – Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC), in particular, would have been a satisfied man as he set them up. The ever-impressive midfielder with his lofted balls could well have had even more assists to his name. Indeed, it was he who also crossed into the area in the 48th minute for Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC) to batter the bar with a header. Lucena’s crosses were a threat from the off, with one that drew a fine save from Klinsmann coming after less than minute. The man who headed this was centre-back Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira) and, some 114 minutes later, he was to ensure that Lucena was not to be denied his assist when he towered high from his team-mate’s pinpoint corner to nod home Venezuela’s second goal.

Overall, though they somewhat sloppily conceded their first goal some 507 minutes into the tournament, this was an otherwise impressive performance from Venezuela, even if they could have been a considerable bit more clinical. Though the USA did not offer much going forward, the defence nevertheless did well not to allow the four-goal Josh Sargent a sniff. However, owing to an accumulation of yellow cards, two of their number will unfortunately be suspended for the Semi-final: the impressive centre-back Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas, soon-to-be Udinese, on loan from Watford) as well as left-back José Hernández (No. 5, Caracas FC). That said, Dudamel does possess two back-up players with more than enough experience – particularly in qualifying – to suggest that they possess the abilities to do effective jobs within this rather well-drilled system.

Uruguay, their opponents in the South American battle on Thursday 8 June 2017, will certainly provide a stern. However, given all that Venezuela have achieved as well as the knowledge that they were the only side to defeat the CONMEBOL champions in qualifying, they have every right to believe that they stand a strong chance of making the Final. Now, wouldn’t that really be something?

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the two remaining South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Argentina – Summary of Top Talents at the FIFA 2017 Under-20 World Cup

Following a brief tournament overview of Argentina’s performance at the FIFA 2017 Under-20 World Cup, below are some summaries of several players worth keeping an eye on. As this was far from a memorable campaign for Los Pibes, those seeking more information on these individuals may wish to also take a look at their respective exploits in qualification as well as, perhaps, this site’s preview for the Under-20 World Cup.

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Surprise inclusion Santiago Colombatto in action against South Korea (GettyImages)

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Argentina

Tournament Overview

Once again, Los Pibes fell short on the global stage. Having scraped through qualification, manager Claudio Úbeda made several changes to the line-up for the opening clash with England and, for 30 minutes at least, it seemed as if his new-look side may just run riot. Alas, despite dominating possession, they conceded against the run of play and ultimately contrived to go down 3-0 in a somewhat peculiar defeat. They followed this up with a 2-1 loss against hosts South Korea, leaving their hopes of progression hanging by a thread. For the crunch game against Guinea, Úbeda finally started with all of his best attackers from qualifiying and this paid off as they performed a 5-0 demolition job. However, owing to results in other groups over the subsequent two days, they were narrowly denied one of the four best third-placed team berths and thus departed at the first stage.

Overall, though their goalkeeper and defence left much to be desired, they do possess several more attack-minded players of note, though whether any of these can ascend to the level demanded by this illustrious footballing nation, is another matter entirely.

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(Group A table and results courtesy of Wikipedia; to read about and view highlights of each game, click here and scroll down)

Top Talents

Lautaro Martínez (Striker, No. 9, Racing Club)

The star striker was hurt in the week leading up to the opening game against England, which likely explains why he only made it onto the field for 15 minutes of this encounter. However, given his contribution consisted mainly of an elbow which saw him red-carded and suspended for the South Korea match, he must have wished that he had sat that one out. Indeed, the man who has been banging them in at club level and linked with, amongst others, Real Madrid, was therefore to have little more than one game to demonstrate to the world why, were it not for him, his country wouldn’t even have made the trip. Nevertheless, when he returned against Guinea he would go some way towards bolstering his reputation as he bagged two goals. The first of these was a sensational top-corner golazo on the turn from the edge of the area and the second a well-worked move with a team-mate from a set-piece which he fired home.

Tomás Conechny (Attacking-midfielder, No. 10, San Lorenzo)

Coach Úbeda appears to not be entirely convinced by Conechny – or is unsure how to integrate him into his similarly rotating plans – because, as with qualifying, Argentina’s topscorer at the Sudamericano Sub-17 two years ago started the tournament on the bench. Yet, when he emerged after 60 minutes in the opener with England, he again proved himself to be one of the liveliest players in the squad; for this, he was rewarded with starts against South Korea as well as Guinea. Thus, from both open play as well as set-pieces, in these two games he also came across as one of the likeliest scorers and/or providers. Ultimately, the San Lorenzo attacker – who has so far only been a substitute at club level – had to settle with just the one assist, a quick pass from a free-kick which bamboozled the unsuspecting Guinea defence and was finished off by Martínez.

He may not have been able to put in a string of vintage performances but he was at least afforded more opportunities than another impressive attacker from the qualifiers, Brian Mansilla (Attacking-midfielder, No. 11, Racing Club). Indeed, following on from two substitute appearances, the man Ajax put a considerable bid in for earlier this year was granted a solitary start against Guinea and gained an assist from a cross.

Santiago Colombatto (Midfielder, No. 15, Trapani, on loan from Cagliari)

Perhaps the most positive aspect of Argentina’s campaign was the emergence of this deep-lying playmaker. He did not participate in the qualifying tournament but nevertheless possesses respectable club experience, having played consistently in Italy’s Serie B this past season. He stood out from the off against England, heading against the crossbar and teeing up team-mates. His most telling Group A contribution occurred in the South Korea game when, from near the halfway line, he played a delightful first-time ball which was rapidly finished off to halve the deficit. In the final encounter against Guinea, he was also responsible for another assist, this time a low ball into the area which Martínez dummied over before a team-mate struck home.

Marcelo Torres (Striker, No. 7, Boca Juniors)

The man Colombatto found with both of these passes was Torres who, with few headlines or hype, managed to maintain his goalscoring reputation, netting two to add to the five that he bagged in seven qualifying games. Having been subbed off on both of his starts as well as coming on from the bench against South Korea – with his goal arriving after being on the field for less than five minutes – he doesn’t appear to have as much backing as Martínez. Indeed, he also played, as well as had to contest a place, with Ezequiel Ponce (Striker, No. 18, Granada, on loan from Roma), who wasn’t part of the qualification team and also failed to get on the scoresheet, though did look particularly alert against England.

Santiago Ascacibar (Defensive-midfielder, No. 5, Estudiantes de La Plata)

Lastly, the captain Ascacibar merits comment more because of the admiration he receives from the likes of Diego Simeone than his actual performances in South Korea. That is not to say that they were bad but, owing to his easy-to-overlook role and, in particular, the porousness and poor positioning of those behind him in the rearguard, it seems a lot harder for him to stand out at national level than it has been in the domestic league where he is a regular. Indeed, the errors of the goalkeeper and back four in the first two games put Los Pibes at a severe disadvantage and there is only so much that their midfield-roamer with the armband can do to rally the troops. Still, plenty in the game more qualified than your humble observer will tell you he is going places so, like most Argentines, let’s just agree to forget about this collective tournament showing and wait and see.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Senegal 0-0 Ecuador (Group F, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 28 May 2017)

Ecuador’s third and final Group F game of the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup ended in a disappointing stalemate which has eliminated them from the competition. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

groupf3

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results, fixtures and standings)

Senegal 0-0 Ecuador

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group F, 28 May 2017 (YouTube)

In a game low on opportunities, Javier Rodríguez’s men were unable to find a way past their Senegalese opponents and will now be on an early flight back home.

The match was hardly blessed with talking points as, with their own qualification hopes always at the forefront of their minds, the Africans were somewhat wary of committing themselves wholeheartedly to forward forays.

That said, Senegal – who were to finish with ten men following a late red card in stoppage-time – did actually break the deadlock ten minutes in the second half – or so they thought. However, following some consultation amongst the officials, it was adjudged that the ball hovering on the goal-line had been kicked out of at least one – if not both – of goalkeeper José Cevallos’ hands and thus this stabbed effort was ruled out.

Although Ecuador showed some intent in the game, aside from a Joao Rojas shot that could well have bypassed the goalkeeper had it a little more direction, they were similarly unable to create many clear sights of goal. Thus, despite such a promising start to the tournament, they bow out, with their three Group F rivals instead progressing.

Talent Tracking

ecuadorflag Ecuador

As with Uruguay’s 0-0 draw yesterday, mercy shall be shown on the reader – not to mention oneself – by not spending undue time ruminating on this performance. Indeed, Ecuador needed a win but, despite having a fair few attackers at their disposal capable of causing problems, Senegal will surely consider this a relatively solid defensive display from their rearguard.

Having been a substitute in the opening two games, Joao Rojas (No. 17, Emelec) was granted a start here. He was one of his side’s more conspicuous attackers and had their best chance, a 79th-minute right-footed effort from the edge of the area, which the goalkeeper did well to get down to parry. Otherwise, he also had a low shot early on following a fine pass from deep by Washington Corozo (No. 7, Independiente Del Valle) – who, in turn, was to show some quick bursts of pace – though this was saved with a greater degree of comfort.

The pickings were indeed rather slim for Ecuador, with their other attempts barely worth mentioning, but here goes: In the 48th minute, Bryan Cabezas (No. 10, Atalanta) fired a low left-footed cross into the area which hit the goalkeeper’s gloves before being cleared. Three minutes later, the man this evaded in the centre, Herlin Lino (No. 9, Deportivo Cuenca), won some space for himself on the inside-right, but his shot was dealt with relatively easily. Much later on at the death, substitute Jordy Caicedo (No. 19, Universidad Católica del Ecuador) hit a shot that elicited an even greater amount of gratitute from the man with the gloves.

Given the clean sheet, the goalkeeper, some of the defence and the two holding midfielders may deserve some credit. However, due to the circumstances which meant that their opponents were somewhat hesitant at times to get forward, it would perhaps be best not to over-egg this particular aspect of the Ecuadorian performance.

Thus, though they certainly have some talented players in their rank, who will be disappointed not to have qualified from the group stage after such a sensational start to the tournament which saw them 2-0 up against the USA in 7 minutes, Ecuador have succumbed at the first hurdle.

In the other Group F game played today, USA and Saudi Arabia drew 1-1, a result which saw both teams progress (along with Senegal) and also dashed Argentina’s hopes of scraping through as one of the four best third-placed teams. Thus, it is left to Uruguay and Venezuela to carry the torch for CONMEBOL in the knock-out stage.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Uruguay 0-0 South Africa (Group F, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 27 May 2017)

Uruguay’s third and final Group D game of the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup saw them uncomfortably draw 0-0 with a decent South Africa side. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

groupd3

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results, fixtures and standings)

Uruguay 0-0 South Africa

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group D, 27 May 2017 (YouTube)

A somewhat lacklustre stalemate was enough for Uruguay to confirm themselves as winners of Group D.

At kick-off, South Africa were already virtually eliminated – that, is barring a high win plus some favourable results elsewhere – but Fabián Coito’s men struggled to assert their supposed superiority. Indeed, though they had a chance or two in the first half it was a largely quiet affair and, soon after the break, their opponents were to look the more likely to score. Luther Singh, in particular, stood out, hitting the crossbar with his right boot from a deep position on the left before having another effort from the same area tipped over soon afterwards. South Africa had other chances to score though, in the latter stages, so did the South Americans, with Nicolás Schiappacasse notably guilty of some eyebrow-raising misses.

Nevertheless, upon the final whistle, the Uruguayans were officialy proclaimed as winners of Group D and, irrespective of today’s performance, will go into the knock-out stage as one of the favourites to lift the trophy.

Talent Tracking

uruguayflag Uruguay

Perhaps it is best not to expend too much thought on this outing, given that Coito’s men were certainly not charging around in top gear. This was possibly owing to the strains of the tightly scheduled group stage as well as the knowledge of their qualification having already been accomplished.

Some changes from the side that beat Japan 2-0 were made, including Matías Viña (No. 17, Nacional) coming in for club team-mate Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) at centre-back. It is unlikely that this alteration was the sole cause but, despite impressively keeping a third consecutive clean sheet, the back four were to have more than a few hairy moments in this game, conceding space as well as several opportunities.

That said, the right-back, José Luis Rodríguez (No. 4, Danubio), did nevertheless maintain his propensity for admirable attacking play when, in the 36th minute, he supplied Uruguay’s best chance of the first half, knocking in a sublime curled ball from the right.

However, the man whose head this greeted, Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid Under-19s), was unable to direct his effort goalwards, as he attempted to nod around the onrushing goalkeeper but instead watched the ball trickle wide. This was to be the first of a few opportunities that the 19-year-old was to squander. The second came in the 74th minute when he bypassed a player in the centre, had a clear sight of goal, yet whacked his shot slightly over. Several minutes later, he was similarly guilty when, following a corner, he ran into a promising position to have a free header in the centre, yet ended up putting his effort wide.

He will not wish to recall this game in a hurry and, for the Uruguayan attack as a whole, it was a far from memorable encounter, with their only other attempt of note being a strike from Agustín Canobbio (No. 19, Fénix) which, from an angle, went across goal and wide.

Still, with seven points, they progress as table-toppers and will regroup for their second round encounter, which shall be played on Wednesday 31 May 2017 against as-yet-unknown opponents. Following the conclusion of the group stage tomorrow, they shall know who precisely shall be next on their gauntlet.

In the other Group D game played today, Italy and Japan drew 2-2 and will both qualify along with Uruguay.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Guinea 0-5 Argentina (Group A, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 26 May 2017)

Argentina’s third and final Group A game of the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup saw them inflict a heavy defeat upon the now-eliminated Guinea, though they will need to wait before discovering whether this was enough to progress. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

GroupA3

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results, fixtures and standings)

Guinea 0-5 Argentina

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group A, 26 May 2017 (YouTube)

Argentina at last found their shooting boots as they routed their African opponents in a game they needed to win by a large margin in order to boost their hopes of advancing out of their group.

With the strongest line-up Claudio Úbeda has fielded thus far in the tournament, Los Pibes dominated proceedings from the off and, following some close shaves, finally got off the mark in the 33rd minute when Marcelo Torres tapped home Santiago Colombatto’s low cross. Ten minutes later, it was 2-0 as Lautaro Martínez announced his return in sensational fashion, turning from the edge of the area to fire a belting strike into the top corner.

Five minutes after the restart, Federico Zaracho made it three, heading in Brian Mansilla’s cross from the left. The following goal on 74 minutes also required a bonce, this time that of Marcos Senesi, who powerfully nodded home a free-kick from Exequiel Palacios. Subsequently, the spanking was capped off five minutes later when Martínez notched his second after Tomás Conechny played a disguised quick free-kick to him and he rapidly struck home into the opposite corner.

Thus, Argentina finally got their tournament underway but, with four other groups yet to be decided, will this prove to be too late for them to salvage one of the four best third-placed team berths?

Talent Tracking

argentinaflag Argentina

Well, well, Claudio Úbeda finally selects in the line-up all four of the most eye-catching attackers from the qualifiers and quelle surprise, they admonish a beating.

He had Lautaro Martínez (No. 9, Racing Club) back from suspension and the widely-touted striker certainly made up for lost time. The first of his two strikes was a goal of the tournament contender which came as he received a pass on the edge of the area, took a touch, then rapidly turned to smash an unstoppable effort into the top right-hand corner. Before this, he had looked alert from the off, playing a role in the first goal for which he dummied over the ball in the centre; overall, he was also to have a few other shots of his own. One of these was the second goal, a rather neat set-piece move which he was attentive to, as he latched onto a short ball that surprised the unsuspecting defence; he thus quickly turned to blast a solid strike into the corner. If, as this writer suspects, Argentina are to scrape through to the next round, they really can’t do without their star man.

The man who played this free-kick pass – which drew comparisons to the exquisite Verón-Zanetti move against England at World Cup ’98 – was Tomás Conechny (No. 10, San Lorenzo), a man who, if he hasn’t finally convinced his manager that he deserves to start every single game, then something has gone awry. Indeed, he always appears to have bundles of energy and intent, regularly looking to either make things happen or force an opponent into an error. As well as his assist, early on in the first half he also combined a few times with Santiago Colombatto (No. 15, Trapani, on loan from Cagliari) – the one revelation from this campaign who wasn’t also part of the qualifying phase – such as when the former found the head of the latter from a corner which the Serie B man then flicked on at the near post, causing a hesitant clearance from the goalmouth.

Their most notable link-up, however, was on the opening goal when Conechny fed a pass to the left inside the area which found Colombatto who, in turn, hit a low ball across the goal which Martínez intelligently evaded, leaving Marcelo Torres (No. 7, Boca Juniors) to fire home for his second tournament goal. Previously, Torres was also not far off scoring on at least two occasions earlier in the match. First of all, when Martínez’s shot was parried and the Boca man nearly got to the rebound, as well as not long afterwards when he headed a cross against the underside of the crossbar, which was then put in by a mixture of his boot and Colombatto’s head. However, the play had already been called back for offside – not that this whistle could prevent Colombatto from requiring bandaging following the contact made by Torres’ boot.

Torres, like Martínez, also scored five goals in qualifying and it was encouraging to see the pair both on the scoresheet, as the experiment with Ezequiel Ponce (No. 18, Granada, on loan from Roma) – who came on here for the last 23 minutes – had fallen somewhat short in the two previous matches.

The fourth and final top attacker from qualifying who was granted a start here – having, in his case, had to settle for cameos from the bench in the last two encounters – was Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club). Here, he went some way towards getting himself into Úbeda’s future line-up plans as he crossed in from the left for club team-mate Federico Zaracho (No. 19, Racing Club) to head home for the third.

The other goal, the fourth, came from a free-kick by Exequiel Palacios (No. 8, River Plate) who dinked in a good ball for centre-back Marcos Senesi (No. 6, River Plate) to head home with force.

Regarding the action at the other end, there wasn’t a great deal for Argentina to be concerned about. Certainly, Guinea had a few attempts, particularly in the latter stages when the South Americans had the game well in the bag, but there was nothing Úbeda will be losing sleep over any time soon. That said, though it is difficult to say off the back of just this one performance, it was good that he made some changes at the back, namely playing a back three and dropping the woeful full-backs Gonzalo Montiel (No. 4, River Plate) and, especially, Milton Valenzuela (No. 3, Newell’s Old Boys).

Time will tell whether these changes will be maintained and reap future dividends. Or will it? After all, though the Argentines went some way to improving their goal difference, we still won’t know until Sunday whether or not they have qualified for the knock-out stage. The permutations are too innumerable to go into here but those who wish to contemplate every last one of them can do so here.

In the other Group A game played today, England beat hosts South Korea 1-0 and thus, with the Three Lions having topped the table, both nations shall participate in the next round.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical