Tag Archives: Filipe Luis

Brazil 0-0 Venezuela – Copa América 2019 Group A (18 June 2019)

The arc of footballing morality bends decisively towards justice as the clinical clarity of technology helps to even up the score. Here, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto’s memorable Copa América 2019 clash against Brazil.

Copa América 2019 – Group A

Tuesday 18 June 2019 – Itaipava Arena Fonte Nova, Salvador

Brazil 0-0 Venezuela

 

Video Highlights of Brazil 0-0 Venezuela, Copa América Group A, 18 June 2019 (YouTube)

“¡Qué Viva el VAR! ¡Bienvenido el VAR!”

Those were the post-match words of Rafael Dudamel after the new technology played a significant role in frustrating the hosts and complementing what was a remarkably resilient Vinotinto display.

In all, three Brazilian goals were ruled out – one by the referee and two with the assistance of VAR. This brings the total of goals denied to Venezuela’s opponents to five in just two games and gives Venezuela two more points than their tireless defensive endeavours would have been rewarded with in previous years.

Over the course of what were in excess of 100 minutes on the pitch, the hosts saw the majority of the ball and, particularly in the early exchanges, seemed determined to compensate for their laboured performance in the opening-day win over Bolivia.

Indeed, they enjoyed over 80 per cent of possession in the first 20 minutes as they ran the Venezuelan defence ragged with quick passes and movement. David Neres and Richarlison – the two standout players from their 2017 Under-20 crop – came closest to scoring, with the former’s 15th-minute strike being sliced wide from a promising position and the latter’s 17th-minute cross-goal shot being parried wide by Wuilker Faríñez.

Despite this, Venezuela were not far off breaking the deadlock themselves when, in the 19th minute a Yangel Herrera cross was glanced agonisingly wide by Salomón Rondón. Although this moment sparked a five-minute spell of Venezuelan pressure which unsettled the home crowd, ultimately it proved to be his side’s only real opportunity of the entire game.

Seleção uneasiness appeared to have been alleviated in the 38th minute when they appeared to take the lead. Here, Dani Alves crossed in low from the right, with Roberto Firmino controlling and striking home. However, the referee was alert to the Liverpool forward pulling down centre-back Mikel Villanueva before taking aim and thus called back the play.

For the remainder of the half, although Brazil maintained overall control, Venezuela did just about leave ajar the potential for an historic upset, most notably when a 43rd-minute counter-attack saw Rondón and Murillo passing the ball between each other but, ultimately,  the latter’s crucial low cross was too close to goalkeeper Alisson.

Boos were heard from the stands at half-time as well as at various points in the second half, even though in this latter period the attacking impetus always resided with Tite’s men, as Venezuela barely made it into opposition territory. Manchester City’s Gabriel Jesús came on after the restart and soon made an impact, first curling an effort wide in 57th minute and, three minutes later, seemingly giving his team the lead. This time, his strike deflected off Villanueva into the path of Firmino, who quickly found the alert Jesús approaching the six-yard-box, who finished off. However, following a VAR review, the position of the Champions League winner Firmino was adjudged to be offside.

Home fan disgruntlement understandably increased, as did the feeling that this was not going to be their night. Not only was the technology coldly and clinically putting the game to rights, but Venezuela’s defensive performance – most notably that of centre-back Yordan Osorio – was proving resolutely defiant. The toll their tracking was taking must have been significant and was possibly a factor in the surprise 66th-minute removal of Yangel Herrera in favour of the speedy attacker Yeferson Soteldo and consequent tactical shift to a 4-4-2. Incidentally, as if to illustrate that a bright future is on the horizon, the arrival of the latter player made him the fourth 2017 Under-20 World Cup runner-up to see action.

Still, Brazil had not completely given in to fate and in the 76th minute they manufactured a scare when Fernandinho’s low cross seemed destined to be tapped in by Jesús, but Osorio’s presence instead helped divert the ball safely to Faríñez.

If the home fans were unhappy with the Portugal-based defender’s physical challenge then, just over ten minutes later, they were absolutely fuming. On the left in the 87th minute, speedy substitute Everton played a one-two before dinking a ball into the centre that Philippe Coutinho prodded home. This time, it appeared that the dam had at last been broken. However, during the VAR review, it was spotted that, before bustling into the back of the net, the Barcelona player’s strike hit the knee of his former club team-mate Firmino – who was standing in an offside position. Thus, VAR, the death of football for some was to yet again offer life to Venezuela.

Given all the stoppages – including two Venezuela players going down injured – the referee allocated nearly ten minutes of added time, during which Brazil managed to create two more chances. First, a 93rd minute low drive across goal by Filipe Luís that only narrowly evaded two sliding forwards and, with the clock approaching 100 minutes, a Fernandinho header that went less than a yard wide of the back post.

Ultimately, however, the match ended 0-0. The feelings of home frustration and disillusionment were matched by the elation and glee of Venezuelans scattered all over the globe. Indeed, even though the defensive organisation deserves enormous credit and the three goal decisions were correct, only a robot could fail to feel a giddy sense of slight fortune about the result. Brazil, whilst not brilliant, dominated proceedings, yet were thwarted by their opponents along with this new panel of arbitration that does not kowtow to home fan and player pressure.

With their two consecutive clean sheets – as well as their final four defensively sound performances in World Cup qualifying – Venezuela know that they certainly have it within themselves to collectively keep the best in their continent at bay. However, with no goals to their name yet a win against Bolivia on Saturday now being almost essential to ensuring their progress to the knock-out stages, a change of tack is surely required. Although a continuation of the same tactics could yield a counter-attacking victory, Dudamel’s men are not going to receive a better opportunity in this tournament to try out their offensive moves than against the side with zero points who also need a win. Of course, a more open game certainly leaves Venezuela somewhat vulnerable at the back but, having so far struggled to link up effectively in the final third, they need to make the most of this match. They must take the game to their opponents, get the win and make everyone genuinely believe that, rather than just being a nuisance merely postponing an inevitable pounding, their stay in Brazil could well instead be extended until the first weekend of July.

Well, after what was experienced in Salvador, anyone could be forgiven for dreaming.

To keep up-to-date with Venezuela’s Copa América campaign, please return to this website as well as follow @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

Brazil (4-2-3-1): Alisson; D. Alves, T. Silva, Marquinhos, F. Luís; Casemiro (Fernandinho, 58′), Arthur; Richarlison (G. Jesús, 46′),  P. Coutinho, D. Neres (Everton, 72′); R. Firmino.

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Hernández, Y. Osorio, M. Villanueva, R. Rosales; J. Moreno, Y. Herrera (Y. Soteldo, 66′), T. Rincón; J. Murillo, D. Machís (A. Figuera, 76′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 86′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Brazil 3-1 Venezuela – CONMEBOL Qualification Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (13 October 2015)

Matchday 2 of La Vinotinto’s 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign brought the second loss to Noel Sanvicente’s charges. Here, Hispanospherical.com provides a match report and offers some thoughts on the game.

CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018

Tuesday 13 October 2015 –  Estádio Plácido Aderaldo Castelo, Fortaleza, Ceará.

Brazil 3-1 Venezuela 

Video Highlights of Brazil 3-1 Venezuela, CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018, 13 October 2015 (YouTube).

Seleção’s Superiority Self-Evident as Venezuela Leave Opening Round Point-Less

Match Report

The night may have begun with boos for Seleção boss Dunga but come the final whistle it was his opposite number Noel Sanvicente whose position had become the more precarious. Brazil, coming off the back of a 2-0 reversal against red-hot Chile, wasted little time trying to get back into their fans’ good books, asserting their superiority with less than 40 seconds on the clock. Luis Gustavo dispossessed Alejandro Guerra in the middle of the park, feeding Chelsea’s Willian who was granted plenty of time to drive into the area and then strike with evidently too much venom for Alain Baroja.

Venezuela initially responded well to this setback, getting forward and gaining some space in opposition territory. However, their hosts were to find that they could afford occasional minor defensive lapses as the visitors offered little from open play, something that could not be said of the likes of Willian, Douglas Costa and Oscar, as well as the wing-backs Dani Alves and Filipe Luis.

For the majority of the half, these players, as well as 35-year-old striker Ricardo Oliveira, largely tested the nerves of the Venezuelan backline more than the actual goal. However, they were to get their reward and go into the break with a scoreline that did justice to their dominance, as Willian doubled the lead in the 42nd minute. This time, Luis jinked past both Ronald Vargas and Roberto Rosales on the left, before pulling the ball back towards the edge of the area; Oscar dummied over it and the incoming Willian blasted home.

The ease with which they maintained the ball – tiring the visitors as they sprayed it about – continued into the second half. Often, the hosts gave the impression that they possessed an extra gear and could shift into it and score more if they really needed to. Costa’s 53rd-minute cross-cum-shot that hit the underside of the bar nearly sealed the win. However, though Venezuela were still a distant second in this half, their set-pieces increasingly improved in quality; one provided unexpected hope. Indeed, Luis Manuel Seijas’ 64th-minute corner was headed by Oswaldo Vizcarrondo to the back post and knocked in by the thigh of Christian Santos in what was his first ever competitive international. Just like that, Venezuela had halved the deficit.

Though the Castelão crowd were momentarily silenced – even the TVes Venezuelan commentators were taken aback – the goal did not significantly alter the game’s complexion; ten minutes later, it was over. Costa’s whipped cross from the left bounced before defender Fernando Amorebieta who opted to use his left boot on the turn to try to clear the ball. Unfortunately for his pride, he swung and failed to make any meaningful contact, with Ricardo Oliveira instead profiting; the Santos striker needed no invitation to score on what was his first start for his national side in over ten years.

Brazil comfortably saw out of the remainder of the game, doing so with Kaká and then later, Hulk, on the field – much to the delight of the squealing females in attendance. While the heat is still very much on coach Dunga, for the next few weeks at least, he will surely be sleeping far more soundly than his Venezuelan counterpart.

What follows are some thoughts on the Venezuelan display. 

Venezuela’s Defence Lacking the Necessary Resilience of the Recent Past 

Against Paraguay, aside from the late gift Baroja and Vizcarrondo delivered to Derlis González – which, considered alone, could be dismissed as an aberration – Venezuela’s defence largely put in a respectable performance. Alas, against vastly superior Seleção opponents, nobody could be said to have emerged favourably.

Goalkeeper Baroja failed to get a strong pair of hands behind Willian’s early goal and was unconvincing with a few of his attempted claims and stops. Right-back Rosales (who can not always replicate his impressive club form for his country), along with left-back Gabriel Cichero, often struggled with the flank attacks of Willian, Costa, Alves and Luis – the second and third goals came from Rosales’ side and Cichero was hoodwinked by Oscar’s dummy on the second. Centre-back Amorebieta stood off Willian for the first, allowing him to strike and was especially embarrassed on the third with his unnecessary air-kick. His partner Vizcarrondo did not play as prominent a role in the concession of goals – conversely, he assisted Venezuela’s solitary effort – but he could have done:  in the 14th minute, he was manfully shrugged off a long ball by Oliveira who ran towards goal in considerable space but shot too close to Baroja.

Collectively, they were regularly given the runaround, struggling to maintain their shape and organisation. Such a performance, considered alongside many other unconvincing displays, increasingly makes the disciplined 1-0 win over Colombia at Copa América look like a curious anomaly. Venezuela’s impressive showing in the last qualification cycle was built upon a relatively strong defence, yet this has rarely been witnessed in Sanvicente’s 15-month tenure. While wholesale changes are not required in this area, greater concentration and organisation levels plus two or three new competitive faces would not go amiss. Alas, regarding the latter, there does not currently appear to be anyone in a good position to fill at least one of those vacancies.

Plenty of Attackers, Few Ideas

Of course, a shaky defence could always be masked by a rampant attack – not two words one expects to put together in a sincere sentence with ‘Venezuela’ any time soon. Indeed, against Paraguay, Salomón Rondón was partnered in attack with Juan Manuel Falcón, with César González and Jeffrén Suárez on the flanks; Guerra, Josef Martínez, and Jhon Murillo were all brought on as second-half substitutes. In Fortaleza, Rondón, nominally at least, was receiving support from three different starting attackers: Santos behind him, with the returning Guerra and Vargas in wide positions. These latter two lasted 45 minutes before being replaced by Murillo and the less offence-minded Arquímedes Figuera; with under 10 minutes to go, Alexander González also came on, replacing the deeper-lying Seijas, a move which required some further positional adjustments.

In all, over these two games, nine different attacking players were used in conjunction with Rondón. Did anything that can be built on actually occur? It seems customary for many Venezuelan fans and media figures to highlight and overstate the quality of any minor piece of skill or invention displayed; to these distant eyes, nothing of note happened that was not done multiple times and with greater panache by many of their Brazilian counterparts.

Perhaps Santos’ goal will have aided his personal cause but for the most part the match was the wearily tedious tale of a group of attackers failing to both combine effectively and create ways of penetrating the opposition rearguard. It is now 15 games into Sanvicente’s reign and virtually no on-field progress in this area has been made. Can anyone, with any genuine confidence, name even one of the players in this part of the pitch that Sanvicente considers a starter? There is, after all, almost as much competition outside of the current squad as within. Further changes are a cert next month in La Paz against Bolivia, as to deal with the high altitude Sanvicente is poised to take with him a large number of home-based players; this, when against Brazil, substitute Arquímedes Figuera was the only representative of the domestic league.

One minor positive to be noted was the standard of set-pieces delivered, mostly by Seijas. Many first-half corners and free-kicks were at least reaching testing areas; by the second period, team-mates were actually making contact and of course, Santos’ headed goal came from a dead-ball put in by the Santa Fe midfielder which, in turn, was headed on by Vizcarrondo. Given the problems from open play, this has long seemed like an area well worth dedicating considerable time towards on the training ground.

Under-Fire Sanvicente Has Little Reason to Expect a Sudden Turnaround

Unsurprisingly, many have lost patience with Sanvicente, whose impressive club-level record holds increasingly little currency these days. Immediately after the Brazil game, in an admittedly completely unscientific Twitter poll, around 75 per cent of voters felt that he should no longer continue as manager. ‘Support is gained with the results and at the moment we do not have them’, he said post-game in Fortaleza. Will he have any to speak of after next month’s qualifiers away to Bolivia and at home to Ecuador? Given that afterwards there will be a four-month gap before the subsequent round of competitive fixtures he, and any under-fire manager knows, just how crucial the November encounters will be.

While some may derive optimism from the competitive debuts of both bright new things, Jeffrén and Santos, it has undeniably been a thoroughly depressing opening to the campaign. Aside from the performances, captain Tomás Rincón was pilloried online by many of his own fans for swapping shirts on the pitch at half-time with two-goal Willian, ultimately the undoubted man of the match. Although professionals such as El General may view such acts differently, symbolically it played into the hands of Vinotinto supporters who feel the team lacks bite, self-respect and character.

Furthermore, before and after the Brazil game, Santos and Alexander González had goods stolen from their luggage at two different Venezuelan airports (UPDATE: Andrés Túñez also had similar problems). There has been some speculation that morale and the general atmosphere in the camp is rather low – such incidents are obviously not likely to help.

Given all that has occurred over the past week or so, it is going to take something rather unanticipated to improve Sanvicente’s mood before the end of the year.

Team Selections

@DarrenSpherical