Tag Archives: Iran

Iran 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (20 November 2018)

Venezuela concluded their rare foray into the Asian continent on the neutral territory of Qatar. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides a match report of their latest friendly outing…

International Friendly

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran 1-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Iran 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 20 November 2018 (YouTube)

La Vinotinto Leave Asian Tour Undefeated

Rafael Dudamel’s much-changed side ended 2018’s late run of six away games with their second consecutive draw.

Contested by two sides seeking to try out new players and approaches, it was not a flair-filled end-to-end thriller, but it did nevertheless contain several significant moments.

The first of these came after nine minutes when an Irani cross found Sardar Azmoun inside of the six-yard box. Unmarked, a goal seemed certain, yet his effort from point-blank-range was miraculously diverted over the bar by the renowned prospect Wuilker Faríñez.

In the following exchanges, goalmouth action was to be in short supply, with Venezuela’s sole effort coming from an untroubling shot on the spin from Josef Martínez. That is, until the 35th minute when captain Tomás Rincón slid a ball forward that was latched onto by the left-sided Darwin Machís; in turn, the Udinese attacker cut onto his right and struck a low effort that creept under the dive of the goalkeeper.

La Vinotinto were now ahead, but they had to be on their toes. Just two minutes later following a defensive giveaway, Faríñez was again called upon, this time to parry a well-hit, though relatively comfortable, strike from Ali Gholizadeh. However, three minutes before the break the Charleroi man had more success, after the ball was robbed off Rincón and knocked into his path. From here, the forward gained space away from centre-back Jhon Chancellor and, from the edge of the area, fired clinically with his left boot past Faríñez.

Going into the break level boosted the morale of Carlos Queiroz’s men and, upon the restart, surely aided them in being much quicker out of the blocks. They were certainly more alert than right-back Ronald Hernández, who in the 49th minute was mugged of the ball by Medhi Taremi, who marched on the Venezuelan goal, but this one-on-one was once again blocked by Faríñez. Then two minutes later, a major setback appeared on the cards as Taremi was brought down in the area by Chancellor and the referee pointed to the spot. However, after consulting the pitch-side VAR monitors, the decision was reversed and Venezuela could breathe a little easier.

Subsequently, the South Americans managed to quell opposition danger with greater success and in the 64th minute, they momentarily thought that they had retaken the lead. Here, a ball suddenly found its way to the feet of Josef Martínez, who made room for  himself away from the goalkeeper and fired home, but alas, the linesman’s flag was up.

As also occurred against Japan last Friday, the game was to then suffer under the bloated weight of a high number of substitutions. However, after this lull, two more chances were created, with each being struck by Venezuelan replacements. First, in the 84th minute, Salomón Rondón took a ball in his stride and fired it across goal, causing the goalkeeper Amir Abedzadeh to pull off a decent parry. Then, two minutes from time on the inside-left within the area, Real Salt Lake’s Jefferson Savarino received a threaded ball from Luis González. Although at a slight angle, he was alone with the goalkeeper, rapidly controlling before firing, but to the frustration of a team-mate in the middle his shot went wide of the mark.

Even though he was offside, it seemed like an eminently scoreable scenario, but ultimately Dudamel’s men had to settle for another draw. On the balance of play, this was probably the fairest result and with an overall record for 2018 of two wins, two draws and two defeats, the manager can’t be too displeased. Still, he will know better than anyone that the present cycle has really only just begun and even just consolidating the team’s current level will be a task that will require negotiating with care. Indeed, at the time of writing, he will most likely have to wait until March to have another look at his full squad. In the meantime, it remains to be seen how the players will progress at their clubs and what, if any, bearing the performances of the latest Under-20 crop in the upcoming Sudamericano tournament will have on his thinking.

Team Selections

Iran (4-3-3): A. Abedzadeh; R. Rezaeian (S. Moharrami, 74′), M. Khanzadeh, S. Hosseini, M. Mohammadi; S. Ghoddos (M. Soleimani, 74′), O. Ebrahimi, V. Amiri (M. Torabi, 65′); A. Gholizadeh (S. Dejagah, 74′), S. Azmoun, M. Taremi (K. Rezaei, 81′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, W. Ángel, B. Añor; J. Moreno; S. Córdova (J. Murillo, 74′), Y. Herrera (J. Savarino, 61′), T. Rincón,  D. Machís (L. González, 81′); J. Martínez (S. Rondón, 74′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – November 2018 Preview

It is said that good things come in threes and this appears to hold true for the Venezuelan national team, who for the third consecutive month, will contest a pair of friendlies. Here, @DarrenSpherical has a look at the latest La Vinotinto squad.

International Friendlies

Friday 16 November 2018 – Ōita Bank Dome Stadium, Ōita, Kyushu Island, Japan

Japan vs Venezuela

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran vs Venezuela

bernardoanor

Bernardo Añor in January 2018 (@Caracas_FC)

Venezuela Embark On First Asian Tour Since 2014

It may not have seemed it during the ten months of inaction following La Vinotinto‘s friendly with Iran in the Netherlands 12 months ago, but Rafael Dudamel’s modest request for “at least five friendlies for 2018” is set to be fulfilled.

Indeed, match No. 5 sees the South Americans travel to Japan and No. 6 has them confronting, once again, Carlos Queiroz’s men – albeit, this time in Qatar – bringing the number of Russia 2018 participants faced in recent months to four.

September and October’s encounters yielded mixed results (two wins and two defeats) in what has been and will remain to be for some time, a period of trials and tactical refinement. This is again reflected in the squad, not least in arguably the most eye-catching inclusion: Bernardo Añor, son of the former international of the same name and the elder brother of Málaga’s Juanpi. The 30-year-old may well finally make his international debut after a career spent entirely in the USA until this year, when he returned home to play for Caracas FC. A left-back who has been known to play further upfield, he will provide competition for the only other domestic-based player in this crop, Carabobo FC’s Luis Mago. The latter is also somewhat of a newcomer to the fold, having only made his debut two months ago and together the pair will be seeking to permanently remove the omitted Rolf Feltscher from the manager’s thinking.

It is debatable whether Añor’s belated international call-up will lead to much in the long-run but one player that surely all fans will be excited to re-embrace is the returning 20-year-old captain of 2017’s Under-20 silver generation, Yangel Herrera. The New York City FC midfielder has recently recovered from a long-term injury and will hope to regain his spot next to senior armband-wearer Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) from the main beneficiary of his 12-month international absence, fellow MLS ball-winner Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA).

Elsewhere, the previously injured Salomón Rondón is also back, surely on a high after his first two league goals for Newcastle United. His deputy Andrés Ponce (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia) made the most of his rare opportunities last month, bagging a goal in each friendly. However, although the 22-year-old forward deservedly keeps his place in the squad it is likely that, for the time being at least, Dudamel will be devoted to making the partnership of the Magpies’ new favourite no. 9 and hotshot Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA) work.

Just behind this front line, Sergio Córdova (Augsburg, Germany) and Darwin Machís (Udinese, Italy) are also back after some time on the sidelines. The right-sided Colombia-based Luis “Cariaco” González has received a call too, with Dudamel evidently wanting another look at the Tolima man after he impressed in spells in September. With so many changes in the make-up of the attacking-midfield, inevitably there have been some noteworthy players who will sit out this double-header. This time it is the turn of Rómulo Otero (Al Wehda, Saudi Arabia, on loan from Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Adalberto Peñaranda (Watford, England) and the betrothed-but-injured headline-grabber Eduard Bello (Deportes Antofagasta, Chile). With experimentation very much the order of the day, these three will surely all be back next year.

One man who should currently be in Japan vying for one of these positions but isn’t is Chile-based 21-year-old midfield jinker Yeferson Soteldo. He had been summoned but in an official press release, he is said to have missed his flight from Santiago and, consequently, “due to the decision of national team manager Rafael Dudamel he will not form part of the group”. This follows on from last month when he was compassionately omitted so that he could stay at home to attend the birth of his third child and from September, when he was called up but ultimately left out as he could not gain a visa to enter into the USA. Thus, for one reason or another the much-touted youngster has not worn the Vinotinto shirt since the Iran match last year. Although time appears to be very much on his side, his many admirers should feel a little concerned at the ground he is currently conceding to his rivals in this most competitive of areas within the squad.

Lastly, centre-back Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) – whose status has quietly risen in recent times, culminating in him wearing the captain’s armband last month when Rincón was rested – will also not be making the trip to Japan, but he will at least be available for the Iran clash.

In their previous duel with the Middle Easterners in November 2017, La Vinotinto were defeated by a solitary goal and the last time they faced Japan back in 2014, a 2-2 draw was retrospectively converted into a 3-0 loss, owing to the fielding of an ineligible Salomón Rondón. As will be repeated for some time yet in these pre-Copa América months, results may not be of paramount importance, but any improvement on these two outcomes will no doubt provide a boost for everyone’s belief in the nascent Qatar 2022 project.

Venezuela Squad

vinotintonov2018

(Note: Having reportedly missed his flight, Yeferson Soteldo will now not be part of this squad.)

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Bernardo Añor (Caracas FC), Jhon Chancellor (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Carabobo FC), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal) & Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Sergio Córdova (Augsburg FC, Germany), Luis González (Deportes Tolima), Yangel Herrera (New York City FC, USA, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Aristóteles Romero (Crotone, Italy) & Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA).

Forwards

Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA), Andrés Ponce (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia), Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Iran 1-0 Venezuela – International Friendly (13 November 2017)

10am in Caracas, 3pm in Nijmegen, 5:30pm in Tehran. On a Monday. For those who were otherwise occupied, here is what happened…

International Friendly

Monday 13 November 2017 – Goffertstadion, Nijmegen, Gelderland, Netherlands

Iran 1-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Iran 1-0 Venezuela, International Friendly, 13 November 2017 (YouTube)

Goalkeeping Error Leads to Marginal Defeat for Spirited Venezuela

Due to a second-half goalkeeping error, Venezuela’s six-game unbeaten run came to an end in what was otherwise a decent run-out for Rafael Dudamel’s youthful side.

Though it was reported as being played behind closed doors, some pockets of Iranian fans were present in the largely empty Goffertstadion, home of Dutch side N.E.C. Nijmegen. No Venezuelan spectators could be spotted, with instead the miniscule number of domestic followers with an interest in this friendly watching an Iranian broadcast online, Venezuelan television channels having opted not to transmit the clash.

In the opening exchanges, it was the supporters of the Middle Eastern World Cup qualifiers – some of whom displayed an image of manager Carlos Queiroz – who were given more to cheer about. Within a minute, their side nearly scored as a cross bounced in from the right, but Reza Ghoochannejhad’s touch lacked the requisite deftness and instead the ball sailed over from close range. Subsequently, the Iranians saw more of the leather sphere and looked sharper, playing in testing crosses and hitting shots that admittedly, if they did creep through the crowded area, caused no real difficulty for goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez.

Though on the backfoot to begin with, Venezuela did gradually come into the game and fashioned several attempts of their own. Firstly, in the 13th minute, Málaga midfielder Juanpi – playing his first international game since October 2016 and who was his side’s leading threat in the first half – knocked a ball forward to captain-for-the-day Salomón Rondón. The West Brom forward then spun on the edge of the area but his left-footed strike comfortably cleared the bar. Two minutes later, Yangel Herrera slid the ball to Juanpi outside the area, who fired a decent shot that the goalkeeper Alireza Beiranvand saved low. Midway through the first half, Juanpi had another opportunity when he struck a left-footed effort from just outside the area on the inside-left. However, though it was well-hit, it went a few yards wide of the far post.

Later on in the 31st minute, Salomón Rondón caused some sudden panic when, from some 30 yards out on the inside-right, he whacked an impressive left-footed shot a mere yard over the woodwork. Then, five minutes later, Venezuela came the closest to scoring than they would in the entire game. Here, Juanpi’s long-distance free-kick was poorly punched by the goalkeeper, leading to the ball being knocked into the path of left-back Rubert Quijada. Despite the inviting scenario, his instinctive first-time strike arrowed directly at the head of defender Morteza Pouraliganji, who cleared off the goal-line.

Though La Vinotinto occasionally asserted themselves in this manner, Iran still saw plenty of the ball and had a few further moments of note. In particular, in the 25th minute, a cross came over from the right and Ashkan Dejagah struck a fine left-footed cross-shot which narrowly evaded a team-mate in the goalmouth as well as the far post. Also, a couple of minutes before the interval, Ramin Rezaeian put in a very dangerous ball from the right. Had Vahid Amiri attempted to make decisive contact first-time, instead of taking an awkward touch on his chest which gifted the ball to Fariñez, he could well have scored.

To begin with at least, perhaps due in part to five substitutes being made at half-time (two for Venezuela, three for Iran), the opening minutes of the second half were a little more reserved. Darwin Machís’ run and low saved shot for La Vinotinto was the only real effort before a series of efforts up the other end, the goal-frame of which was now being occupied by José Contreras.

Indeed, first, in the 55th minute, he pulled off a sensational save when a corner was headed down from close range and he was able to instinctively turn the bouncing ball over his own crossbar. Then, within a minute of this, a nodded effort from Ghoochannejhad did bypass him, though this was ruled out for offside. However, soon afterwards in the 57th minute, his own head must have deserted him as he manically ran out of the area on the inside-right in order to intercept a through-ball. To his embarrassment, he was beaten by Amiri who passed it into the centre where Alireza Jahanbakhsh was able to tap the ball into an unguarded net. 1-0 to Iran.

Dudamel’s largely cautious approach of absorbing pressure, seeking to counter on the break as well as generally wear down the wherewithal of their opponents often looks and feels a little precarious. Today, with their otherwise commendable rearguard breached, the onus was suddenly on them to make the running up the other end. At first, they struggled, with the next chance of note falling to the Iranians as a long ball found substitute Sardar Azmoun just outside the area on the inside-left; though his shot dipped into the side-netting, it was a mark of his confidence that he attempted such a strike in the first place.

However, ultimately, though they also had to fend off some crosses and block various attempts, Venezuela were to see out the last 20-25 minutes with more moments of note than their opponents. The man primarily responsible for this shift in complexion was Juanpi’s 58th-minute replacement, Yeferson Soteldo, one of five 2017 Under-20 World Cup finalists to participate in the match. The Chile-based dribbler often galvanised his team-mates and spearheaded moves with his jinking runs. Ten minutes after his introduction, he weaved some magic on the left before crossing into the area, though Rondón’s header, from an awkward position, went harmlessly wide. In the 83rd minute, Soteldo had his best moment of the game, when he went on a central rampage, played a one-two with Rondón and then struck low from just outside the area, which required a good low stretched parry from substitute goalkeeper Mohammad Mazaheri, earning a corner. Later on, with a minute remaining, he also did well to cut onto his right foot on the edge of the area and force a low save.

Amidst these opportunities, Soteldo and his fellow attacking-midfielders Machís and Jhon Murillo were also involved in some moves which culminated in crosses narrowly evading meaningful contact in the goalmouth. That said, Venezuela’s best other chance came courtesy of Soteldo’s erstwhile Under-20 colleague Ronaldo Lucena, whose 86th-minute deceptively swerving free-kick was well-saved by the goalkeeper, who did well to track the trajectory of the ball and tip over.

Throughout all of this, Iran’s attacking threat was always lurking and they could well have doubled their lead in the 84th minute when Azmoun found himself in some space within the area. However, his low strike was well-blocked by the legs of Contreras.

Alas, when the final whistle blew in the eastern Netherlands, Dudamel’s squad again had to taste defeat, albeit for the first time at senior level in seven-and-a-half months. Still, better here than in a competitive match, they will surely reason. With a few familiar faces missing and the next friendly encounter not likely to take place until over four months from now, perhaps reading too much into any outcome was always going to be somewhat futile. Performances and the adaptation to the coach’s methods are surely what is paramount and, with some of the next generation impressing and the defeat against World Cup-calibre opponents occurring due to a hasty error by a back-up goalkeeper, Dudamel can not be too disappointed with his Dutch day out.

Team Selections

Iran (4-3-2-1): A. Beiranvand (M. Mazaheri, 46′); R. Rezaeian, M. Pouraliganji, J. Hosseini (O. Ebrahimi, 61′), E. Hajsafi; S. Ezatolahi (A. Imani, 46′), Ali Karimi, A. Dejagah (S. Ghoddos, 46′); A. Jahanbakhsh (K. Rezaei, 61′), V. Amiri; R. Ghoochannejhad (S. Azmoun, 61′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): W. Fariñez (J. Contreras, 46′); R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, W. Ángel, R. Quijada; Y. Herrera (A. Blondell, 87′), A. Figuera (A. Romero, 46′); J. Murillo, Juanpi (Y. Soteldo, 58′), D. Machís (R. Lucena, 75′); S. Rondón.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly International – November 2017 Preview

Seeking to build on the momentum gained in recent months, a friendly with Russia 2018-bound competition has been cobbled together. Here, @DarrenSpherical takes a brief look at the La Vinotinto squad currently preparing in the Netherlands…

International Friendly

Monday 13 November 2017 – Goffertstadion, Nijmegen, Gelderland, Netherlands

Iran vs Venezuela

juanpipic

Juanpi, celebrating a spectacular goal against Argentina, has earned a recall (Marca).

Every Opportunity Counts

This curious encounter between two nations whose relationship has long raised eyebrows in the White House sees Venezuela coach Rafael Dudamel hoping to capitalise on the strides made in the second half of 2017.

Perhaps in part due to its timing – announced less than three weeks ago, just after a qualification cycle had ended and over 18 months before the next competitive match – Venezuelan media coverage of this friendly has been almost non-existent. That it is taking place in the Netherlands may also be a factor: Arnhem was originally scheduled to be the host city, but the match has since been moved to Nijmegen, where it will be played behind closed doors at the home of the local second-tier side.

For this single game, Dudamel has called up a reduced 20-man squad. Following on from the relative success he has overseen in the final four World Cup qualifiers played over September and October – three draws and a win – he has selected seven players who were Under-20 World Cup runners-up back in June. Many of these players have already made important senior contributions and this squad provides an opportunity for highly-touted attacker Adalberto Peñaranda (Málaga, on loan from Watford) to be reintegrated with the fold, injury having ruled him out of previous call-ups.

With Dudamel now signed up for the long run, there should be many more call-ups for these individuals as well as other members of this silver generation, not least Sergio Córdova (Augsburg), who has featured regularly for the seniors but is currently sidelined, having picked up a knock last month in the win against Paraguay.

Otherwise, though Dudamel’s intentions have not been elaborated upon in great detail, it is apparent that he wishes to try out a few new things. Indeed, though this selection includes many familiar faces from recent games, notably absent are captain Tomás Rincón (Torino, on loan from Juventus), MLS hotshot Josef Martínez (Atlanta United) and Rómulo Otero (Atlético Mineiro). All three men are likely to play crucial roles in the assault on Qatar 2022, but one man who may profit from their strategic omissions is versatile midfielder Juanpi (Málaga). His exclusion from last month’s monster 31-man squad was a surprise, yet though the door has not re-opened for club team-mate Roberto Rosales, many will be hoping that this 23-year-old will be able to re-assert himself as a key player for the future. Whilst a deep-lying position is possible, a more attacking role is likelier.

Iran, who have been led to their second consecutive World Cup by Carlos Queiroz, will certainly pose a test. They beat La Vinotinto 1-0 in the two nations’ solitary previous encounter some 15 years ago and come into the game having defeated fellow Russia 2018 qualifiers Panama on Thursday. In this game – also played on European soil – the Central Americans’ goal was netted by one Gabriel Torres, a striker who has enjoyed two high-scoring spells at Venezuelan side Zamora FC.

Though there won’t be much of an atmosphere at this upcoming clash and it seems unlikely to attract much of an audience back home, Dudamel has long set his sights on Qatar 2022 and will seek to make the most of every opportunity that can help his side make progress. Of course extending the seniors’ six-match unbeaten streak would be great, but more players adapting well to his system, irrespective of the result, will surely be of overriding importance in Nijmegen.

Venezuela Squad

venezuelairansquad

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

José Contreras (Deportivo Táchira) & Wuilker Fariñez (Caracas FC)

Defenders

Wilker Ángel (Terek Grozny, Russia), Jhon Chancellor (Delfín, Ecuador), Víctor García (Vitória Guimarães, Portugal), José Hernández (Caracas FC), Ronald Hernández (Stabæk, Norway), Rubert Quijada (Al Gharafa, Qatar, on loan from Caracas FC) & Mikel Villanueva (Cádiz, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Málaga, Spain), Arquímedes Figuera (Universitario, Peru), Yangel Herrera (New York City FC, USA, on loan from Manchester City, England), Ronaldo Lucena (Atlético Nacional, Colombia), Darwin Machís (Granada, Spain), Jhon Murillo (Kasımpaşa S.K., Turkey, on loan from Benfica, Portugal), Adalberto Peñaranda (Málaga, Spain, on loan from Watford, England), Aristóteles Romero (Crotone, Italy) & Yeferson Soteldo (Huachipato, Chile).

Forwards

Anthony Blondell (Monagas S.C.) & Salomón Rondón (West Bromwich Albion, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical