Tag Archives: Japan

Japan 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (16 November 2018)

Venezuela’s Asian tour has got underway, with Japan the first stop. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides an account of the events in Ōita…

International Friendly

Friday 16 November 2018 – Ōita Bank Dome Stadium, Ōita, Kyushu Island, Japan

Japan 1-1 Venezuela

Goal Highlights of Japan 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 16 November 2018 (YouTube)

El General Rallies the Troops Late On

Having soaked up a considerable amount of Japanese pressure, Venezuela eventually managed to gain a draw on the first leg of their Asian tour courtesy of the first-ever international goal by captain Tomás Rincón.

The opening exchanges had a rather different complexion, however, as Rafael Dudamel’s reinforced line-up – Rincón, Júnior Moreno and the returning Yangel Herrera were all fielded in the middle – enjoyed a few notable chances. First of all, after 11 minutes, a ball ricocheted into Salomón Rondón’s path, who nudged it past debuting US-born goalkeeper Daniel Schmidt; the effort of the Newcastle striker was inches from crossing the line until defender Takehiro Tomisayu stretched to clear at the last moment.

Rondón again came close just four minutes later, following a free-kick on the right edge of the area won by the dynamic Darwin Machís. Although the Magpie’s initial attempt was blocked, he responded by lashing a fearsome left-footed strike which almost grazed Schmidt’s far post. Later in the 25th minute, Rondón played a ball on for roaming right-back Roberto Rosales who, somewhat similarly to the previous effort, also hit an effort with his less-favoured left boot that went across goal and not too far wide of the mark.

Throughout all of this, the hosts were also a threat, occasionally finding gaps, storming forward before a cross would typically be thwarted by a defender. Their first clear chance came in the 26th minute when some quick passes left the ball at the feet of Ritsu Doan, who spun and shot past goalkeeper Rafael Romo. Vinotinto hearts were in mouths, but mercifully for them, the Groningen man’s effort went narrowly wide of the post. Soon after at the half-hour mark Japan were again not far off when Takumi Minamino crossed low for Yuya Osako, though the visitors were to have 20-on-Monday Nahuel Ferraresi to thank, as he put in a sliding boot to divert out. Four minutes later, Romo was to be the momentary hero, as a defence-splitting pass forward found Shoya Nakajima whose one-on-one shot the goalkeeper manfully stood up to, diverting wide.

However, La Vinotinto could not completely stem the tide and so in the 39th minute, the hosts found the opener. Here, Nakajima’s free-kick was swung in from deep on the right and Marseille defender Hiroki Sakai met it in the air to volley home with aplomb. 1-0 and, just under two minutes before the break, Nakajima almost doubled the lead when, on the inside-left, he cut onto his right before firing low into the side-netting.

As the second half began, La Vinotinto knew they needed to get a foothold back into the match, but unfortunately for them, the hosts were in no mood to be accommodating. Subsequently, the majority of the best chances were to fall to Japan, one of which was a shot by Getafe midfielder Gaku Shibasaki that Romo parried at his near post. A few minutes later, the Samurai Blue had another opportunity when Osako slid the ball to Doan, but the latter’s effort from the left was blocked low by the goalkeeper.

Shortly afterwards the pace of the game was to be gradually diluted by the raft of substitutions, one of which was the 74th-minute introduction of international debutant, Bernardo Añor. Yet, just a minute later, the hosts were to regain some of their attacking momentum as Genki Haraguchi earned himself some space from his marker and, with some close control, danced his way into an acute spot to the left of the goal, but his attempt was greeted by the wall of Romo. The 28-year-old Cyprus-based shot-stopper has only been a part of Dudamel’s thinking since the dawn of this new cycle in September, but on the basis of his two appearances within that time, he has shown enough to be confidently described as Wuilker Faríñez’s understudy.

Despite the Japanese having the better of the game, five minutes later goalscorer Sakai was to squander his side’s on-field superiority as he clumsily brought down substitute Luis González in the area. After a delay, captain Tomás Rincón stepped up and confidently converted the penalty, bringing his side level when a defeat was beginning to seem inevitable. In the 91st minute, El General managed to rescue his side again when, following some ball-waltzing from Koya Gitagawa, he put in a perfectly-timed last-ditch challenge to slide the ball wide.

Following a header in the final throes of stoppage-time the hosts did actually have the ball in the back of the net, but a linesman’s flag quickly halted the elation in the stands. Thus, the game ended in a creditable 1-1 draw for Dudamel’s men. Although – some early first-half pressure and attempts aside – the performance left something to be desired, this result against a World Cup-level opponent in front of over 33,000 of their fans certainly feels like a respectable outcome. Fans will be hoping they can go one step further in Qatar on Tuesday, when the side face a similarly tough encounter against Carlos Queiroz’s Iran.

Team Selections

Japan (4-2-3-1): D. Schmidt; H. Sakai, M. Yoshida, T. Tomiyasu, S. Sasaki; W. Endo, G. Shibasaki; R. Doan (K. Sugimoto, 77′), T. Minamino (J. Ito, 77′), S. Nakajima (G. Haraguchi, 68′); Y. Osako (K. Kitagawa, 68′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): R. Romo; R. Rosales, N. Ferraresi, J. Chancellor, L. Mago (B. Añor, 74′); J. Moreno (J. Savarino, 90+5′); J. Murillo (L. González, 65′), Y. Herrera (A. Romero, 65′), T. Rincón, D. Machís (S. Córdova, 84′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 65′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – November 2018 Preview

It is said that good things come in threes and this appears to hold true for the Venezuelan national team, who for the third consecutive month, will contest a pair of friendlies. Here, @DarrenSpherical has a look at the latest La Vinotinto squad.

International Friendlies

Friday 16 November 2018 – Ōita Bank Dome Stadium, Ōita, Kyushu Island, Japan

Japan vs Venezuela

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran vs Venezuela

bernardoanor

Bernardo Añor in January 2018 (@Caracas_FC)

Venezuela Embark On First Asian Tour Since 2014

It may not have seemed it during the ten months of inaction following La Vinotinto‘s friendly with Iran in the Netherlands 12 months ago, but Rafael Dudamel’s modest request for “at least five friendlies for 2018” is set to be fulfilled.

Indeed, match No. 5 sees the South Americans travel to Japan and No. 6 has them confronting, once again, Carlos Queiroz’s men – albeit, this time in Qatar – bringing the number of Russia 2018 participants faced in recent months to four.

September and October’s encounters yielded mixed results (two wins and two defeats) in what has been and will remain to be for some time, a period of trials and tactical refinement. This is again reflected in the squad, not least in arguably the most eye-catching inclusion: Bernardo Añor, son of the former international of the same name and the elder brother of Málaga’s Juanpi. The 30-year-old may well finally make his international debut after a career spent entirely in the USA until this year, when he returned home to play for Caracas FC. A left-back who has been known to play further upfield, he will provide competition for the only other domestic-based player in this crop, Carabobo FC’s Luis Mago. The latter is also somewhat of a newcomer to the fold, having only made his debut two months ago and together the pair will be seeking to permanently remove the omitted Rolf Feltscher from the manager’s thinking.

It is debatable whether Añor’s belated international call-up will lead to much in the long-run but one player that surely all fans will be excited to re-embrace is the returning 20-year-old captain of 2017’s Under-20 silver generation, Yangel Herrera. The New York City FC midfielder has recently recovered from a long-term injury and will hope to regain his spot next to senior armband-wearer Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) from the main beneficiary of his 12-month international absence, fellow MLS ball-winner Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA).

Elsewhere, the previously injured Salomón Rondón is also back, surely on a high after his first two league goals for Newcastle United. His deputy Andrés Ponce (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia) made the most of his rare opportunities last month, bagging a goal in each friendly. However, although the 22-year-old forward deservedly keeps his place in the squad it is likely that, for the time being at least, Dudamel will be devoted to making the partnership of the Magpies’ new favourite no. 9 and hotshot Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA) work.

Just behind this front line, Sergio Córdova (Augsburg, Germany) and Darwin Machís (Udinese, Italy) are also back after some time on the sidelines. The right-sided Colombia-based Luis “Cariaco” González has received a call too, with Dudamel evidently wanting another look at the Tolima man after he impressed in spells in September. With so many changes in the make-up of the attacking-midfield, inevitably there have been some noteworthy players who will sit out this double-header. This time it is the turn of Rómulo Otero (Al Wehda, Saudi Arabia, on loan from Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Adalberto Peñaranda (Watford, England) and the betrothed-but-injured headline-grabber Eduard Bello (Deportes Antofagasta, Chile). With experimentation very much the order of the day, these three will surely all be back next year.

One man who should currently be in Japan vying for one of these positions but isn’t is Chile-based 21-year-old midfield jinker Yeferson Soteldo. He had been summoned but in an official press release, he is said to have missed his flight from Santiago and, consequently, “due to the decision of national team manager Rafael Dudamel he will not form part of the group”. This follows on from last month when he was compassionately omitted so that he could stay at home to attend the birth of his third child and from September, when he was called up but ultimately left out as he could not gain a visa to enter into the USA. Thus, for one reason or another the much-touted youngster has not worn the Vinotinto shirt since the Iran match last year. Although time appears to be very much on his side, his many admirers should feel a little concerned at the ground he is currently conceding to his rivals in this most competitive of areas within the squad.

Lastly, centre-back Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) – whose status has quietly risen in recent times, culminating in him wearing the captain’s armband last month when Rincón was rested – will also not be making the trip to Japan, but he will at least be available for the Iran clash.

In their previous duel with the Middle Easterners in November 2017, La Vinotinto were defeated by a solitary goal and the last time they faced Japan back in 2014, a 2-2 draw was retrospectively converted into a 3-0 loss, owing to the fielding of an ineligible Salomón Rondón. As will be repeated for some time yet in these pre-Copa América months, results may not be of paramount importance, but any improvement on these two outcomes will no doubt provide a boost for everyone’s belief in the nascent Qatar 2022 project.

Venezuela Squad

vinotintonov2018

(Note: Having reportedly missed his flight, Yeferson Soteldo will now not be part of this squad.)

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Bernardo Añor (Caracas FC), Jhon Chancellor (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Carabobo FC), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal) & Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Sergio Córdova (Augsburg FC, Germany), Luis González (Deportes Tolima), Yangel Herrera (New York City FC, USA, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Aristóteles Romero (Crotone, Italy) & Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA).

Forwards

Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA), Andrés Ponce (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia), Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela 1-0 Japan (AET) (Round of 16, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 30 May 2017)

Venezuela’s Round of 16 clash with Japan at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup took 120 minutes to decide but ultimately Rafael Dudamel’s heroic charges emerged victorious. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

venezuelahapanresult

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Venezuela 1-0 Japan (AET)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Round of 16, 30 May 2017 (YouTube)

After negotiating their way through an additional thirty minutes of play, Rafael Dudamel’s men were finally able to make history by becoming the first ever Venezuelan side to reach the Quarter-finals of the Under-20 World Cup.

It was an often tense encounter, in which the burgundy boys were put under more pressure than in any of their preceding games. Indeed, despite having a respectable share of the ball in the opening exchanges, towards the end of the first half, it was Japan who started to edge proceedings. They nearly found the back of Wuilker Fariñez’s cobweb-filled net in the 29th minute when Ritsu Doan curled a fine free-kick over the wall, which crashed off the crossbar, rebounding for Yuto Iwasaki to screw a shot wide of the post.

Venezuela’s hitherto steely defence was rattled by moments such as this and their Asian opponents were to continue to look the likelier to score for at least the first quarter-hour of the second half. However, as the game wore on, despite the South Americans making no changes in regulation time – by contrast, Japan had made all three of theirs by the 76th minute – they appeared more intent on winning the game without resorting to penalties. Yeferson Soteldo and, in particular, Adalberto Peñaranda, began to cause more problems with their jinking runs yet when the 90 minutes were over, the game was still deadlocked at 0-0.

The first half of extra-time was a little cagey with Venezuela nevertheless maintaining the the upper hand, though when Peñaranda was withdrawn after 97 minutes one could be forgiven for thinking that spot-kicks were inevitable. However, from a Ronaldo Lucena corner in the 108th minute, captain Yangel Herrera was the man to strike a blow against fatalistic thoughts as he powerfully headed home to send his compatriots into raptures. Subsequently, Venezuela were able to see out this euphoric, record-breaking win and thus take another almighty leap in their increasingly plausible quest to transform from dark horses into genuine contenders for the tournament outright.

Talent Tracking

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Owing to Japan’s neat, quick-paced, passing moves, goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) had to be on much higher alert than he was in any of his previous outings. Admittedly, he was somewhat fortunate not to lose his 100 per cent clean sheet record from Ritsu Doan’s 29th-minute free-kick against the crossbar which had him beat. However, just before this he had done well to anticipate a through-ball and clear before the opponent reached it and, later on in the 57th minute, he pulled off his best save of the tournament when, following a lovely Doan pass to Akito Takagi, he solidly blocked the latter’s low effort. When a penalty shootout appeared to be looming, it looked as if there was a chance that Fariñez would grab the headlines as both converter and stopper. Instead, however, the highly-rated youngster will just have to settle for the recognition that this was undoubtedly the most impressive of his four World Cup performances so far.

Good as Fariñez was though, in both this competition as well as qualifying, he’s rarely, if ever, had his goal bombarded by opponents and for this, he owes a debt of gratitude to the outfield rearguard. Indeed, much credit for the incredible 390 minutes Venezuela have gone without conceding a goal should go to the most consistent members of the back four. Namely, these would be right-back Ronald Hernández (No. 20, Zamora FC), who cleared danger effectively, made a notable recovery challenge and also caused some discomfort going forward, as well as the centre-back pairing of Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas, soon-to-be Udinese, on loan from Watford) and Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira). Whilst they faced their most difficult test yet in the form of the roaming playmaker Doan, these two men did well in largely repelling what was thrown at them. Furthermore, having replaced Eduin Quero (No. 3, Deportivo Táchira) at left-back for the second consecutive game, José Hernández (No. 5, Caracas FC) can also feel pleased with himself. So too can coach Dudamel, whose admirable system appears to maintain its organisation despite at least two notable changes in its personnel being made since the qualifying stage.

On a related note, the two chaps in front of the defence once again earned plaudits for their support in halting opposition forays. From an attacking perspective, both were also to play crucial roles, with Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) again a regular threat from set-pieces. One of his more notable chipped efforts into the area within regulation time fell to Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas Atlético) in the 76th minute and, even if play was ultimately called back, the latter did force a solid goalkeeping block with his powerful strike. However, of course, Lucena’s most vital contribution occurred in the 108th minute, soon after one of his corners had been headed over from a very inviting position by a combination of Ferraresi and a defender. His subsequent inswinger reached the penalty spot and was brilliantly headed into the back of the net by his midfield partner-in-crime and all-round captain fantastic, Yangel Herrera (No. 8, New York City FC, on loan from Manchester City).

Before this goal, the likeliest outlet for a Venezuelan opener had seemed to be Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford). After just five minutes, he showed his brilliant capacity for dribbling as, from the left flank, he nutmegged one opponent and then bypassed another, before striking a low right-footed effort into the side-netting. A few more tricks were demonstrated throughout his 97 minutes on the field and he also caused some more discomfort amongst the Japanese defence in the 72nd minute when he hit a low cross-cum-shot across goal.

He had been played into this promising position by Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) who actually hit a similar ball into the goalmouth later on in the 98th minute. The dimunitive dribbler, who has thus far in the tournament been somewhat overshadowed by Peñaranda, nevertheless had a decent game, often maintaining good possession with his glue-smeared boots and looking to make things happen.

That said, clear efforts on target were few and far between in this contest, something which Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC) sought to rectify in the 68th minute when he hit a fine low strike from over 25 yards which the goalkeeper had to get down low to in order to parry out. Also, much earlier in the 19th minute, the tournament topscorer had another opportunity on goal, when he ran onto a through ball which he was able to nudge ahead of the goalkeeper, though this was nevertheless blocked.

Still, though the game wasn’t always pretty, the winning goal will certainly be a thing of beauty for bleary-eyed Venezuelans to marvel over during the upcoming days. Following these motivating and inspiring repeated viewings, expectations shall surely mount. Indeed, whilst a Quarter-final on Sunday 4 June 2017 against the winner of Thursday’s encounter between USA and New Zealand will certainly pose some challenges, it is currently hard for followers of La Vinotinto‘s youngsters to imagine who could conceivably stop them. After four wins and four clean sheets, who can blame them?

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the two remaining South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

El empate 2-2 de Venezuela con Japón en septiembre, determinado derrota 3-0 por la FIFA

japan

La página de resultados de Venezuela de FIFA.com

(Este artículo fue escrito originalmente en inglés britain1  usaflag después de que el asunto fuera anunciado en la cuenta de Twitter de esta web.)

Recientemente ha salido a la luz que el resultado 2-2 en el amistoso internacional jugado en el Estadio Yokohama el 9 de septiembre de 2014 entre Japón y Venezuela ha sido anulado por la FIFA, siendo en su lugar compensado el equipo local con una victoria de 3-0.

Mientras que ni la FIFA ni la Federación Venezolana de Fútbol (FVF) han hecho ninguna declaración pública oficial y no ha aparecido ninguna referencia a la revocación en los medios venezolanos, la sanción está indicada en la página oficial del organismo de gobierno global del fútbol.

Se supone que la justificación tras esta decisión es debida a la presencia en el terreno de juego de Salmón Rondón en este partido, a pesar de que el delantero tenía una tarjeta roja del partido previo contra Corea del Sur.  Efectivamente, el jugador del Zenit de San Petersburgo fue expulsado aparentemente por comentarios que hizo contra uno de los oficiales del partido mientras estaba sentado en el banquillo en los últimos cinco minutos del partido y aun así continuó jugando en el posterior partido contra Japón cuatro días después.

De acuerdo con el Código Disciplinario de la FIFA (página 32, artículo 55) un equipo que ponga en campo a un jugador descalificado no solo perderá el juego si no que también pagará una multa, que en un amistoso le costaría a la FVF 4000 Francos Suizos (CHF) – aproximadamente unos 26.000 Bolívares Fuertes Venezolanos (VEF). Debido a la falta de información aportada en este asunto, en estos momentos no se sabe si esta multa ha sido cobrada y si lo ha sido, si esto ha tenido un impacto en el equipo nacional teniendo que cancelar un total de cuatro amistosos propuestos en octubre, y situando en su lugar sesiones de entrenamiento en Madrid en gran parte con jugadores que viven en el extranjero.

De todas formas, aunque este asunto sólo ha llegado a la atención del público en las últimas horas, la FVF son sin duda conscientes de ello puesto que ya han cumplido con las normas en lo que se refiere a suspensiones, no convocando a Rondón para ninguna tarea internacional en este mes, descartándole por lo tanto de los amistosos contra Chile y Bolivia.

Para ver el incidente de la tarjeta roja de Rondón contra Corea del Sur, haga click aquí (desde el minuto 10:35 en adelante) y para ver los momentos destacados de este juego, haga click aquí.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Traducido por:

Susana Spherical

Venezuela’s 2-2 Draw with Japan in September Ruled a 3-0 Defeat by FIFA

japan

Venezuela’s Results Page from FIFA.com

(Este artículo fue escrito originalmente en inglés después de que el asunto fuera anunciado en la cuenta de Twitter de esta web. Para leer la traducción al español, haga click aquí. venezuelaflag Spain)

It has recently emerged that the 2-2 result in the international friendly played at Yokohama Stadium on 9 September 2014 between Japan and Venezuela has been overturned by FIFA, with the home side instead being awarded a 3-0 victory.

While no official public statement has been made by either FIFA or the Federación Venezolana de Fútbol (FVF) and no reference to the reversal appearing in the Venezuelan media, the forfeiture of the game is noted on the official website of football’s global governing body.

It is presumed that the justification behind the decision is due to the fielding of Salomón Rondón in this match, despite the striker having been red-carded in the previous game against South Korea. Indeed, the Zenit St. Petersburg player was sent off seemingly for comments made towards a match official while sitting on the substitutes bench in the last five minutes of the encounter and yet went on to play in the subsequent game against Japan four days later.

According to FIFA’s Disciplinary Code (Page 32, Article 55), a team fielding an ineligible player must not only forfeit the game but also pay a fine, which for a friendly would cost the FVF a minimum of 4000 Swiss Francs (CHF) – approximately 26,000 Venezuelan Bolívares Fuertes (VEF). Due to the lack of information provided on this matter, it is currently unknown whether this fine has been collected and if it has, whether this had any impact on the national side having to cancel a total of four proposed friendly games in October and instead hosting training sessions in Madrid with largely overseas-based players.

Nevertheless, though this matter has only come to public attention in the last few hours, the FVF are doubtless aware of it as they have now complied with the rules regarding suspensions by not calling up Rondón for international duty this month, thus ruling him out of the friendlies against Chile and Bolivia.

To see footage of Rondón’s red card incident against South Korea, click here (from 10:35 onwards) and to watch highlights of this game, click here.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical