Tag Archives: Jefferson Lerma

Colombia 3-0 Venezuela — Conmebol Qualification Stage for Fifa World Cup 2022 (9 October 2022)

Oh football’s bloody back, all right...

Conmebol Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2022

Friday 9 October 2022 — Estadio Metropolitano Roberto Meléndez, Barranquilla

Colombia 3-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights (YouTube)

Atalanta Trio Provide Poor Premiere for Peseiro

José Peseiro’s first game in charge of Venezuela was one to forget as La Vinotinto were put out of sight by a clinical Colombia before the half-time whistle.

The well-travelled Portuguese coach would have been fearing the worst with barely even ten minutes played, as the in-form Darwin Machís was shown a red following a horrific ankle injury suffered by Colombian right-back Santiago Arias. This card, however, was rescinded, as VAR proved the Granada attacker’s role in the incident had been accidental.

It wasn’t much of a reprieve, though, as with 16 minutes on the clock the 11 men of Venezuela fell behind to a Duván Zapata tap-in. Carlos Queiroz’s charges took advantage of the visitors’ laissez-faire marking, with a well-worked move down the full length of the right channel resulting in a low Juan Cuadrado cross that was finished off by the sliding Atalanta forward.

Ten minutes later, the lead was doubled, and this time both Venezuelan full-backs were made to look silly. First, another Atalanta player, left-back Johan Mojica, dribbled into the area, leaving right-back Ronald Hernández flailing on the ground, before passing it to Luis Muriel; Vinotinto left-back Roberto Rosales was again all over the place as Mojica and Zapata’s Atalanta teammate Muriel was able to calmly place it in the back of the net.

On at least a few occasions in the game, Venezuela goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez looked shaky and lacking in focus. Perhaps this was owing to a lack of first-team game time at his new French club, but it’s not the first time he has raised question marks and so post-match calls for Joel Graterol to instead be given a chance will only increase.

In the 35th minute, the Lens acquisition noticeably spilled a shot from Bournemouth’s Jefferson Lerma and was luckily saved by the post. Then, in stoppage time, he probably should have done better for Colombia’s third goal. Here, his counterpart at the other end, Camilo Vargas, threw the ball out to Muriel who, once again, was given the freedom of Junior’s spacious stadium. This time he ran from inside his own half up the left and into the area, where a bit of footwork easily shifted him away from Jhon Chancellor and allowed a strike at the near post. Faríñez made contact with the ball, but could only divert it into the roof of his net for 3-0.

Subsequently, the second half was a bit of a write-off, with a combined total of nine substitutions being made, one of which saw New York Bulls’ Cristian Casseres Jr., son of another international, gain his first cap.

To their credit, the Venezuelans did at least continue to try to get forward, but their attempts throughout the game were mostly from long range and the best one actually occurred in the first half: a fine 36th-minute arrow released by Rosales outside of the area that actually hit the side of the post. Even so, it was the hosts’ substitute Falcao who came the closest in the second period, striking a low effort on the turn that Faríñez was able to block.

Given the soporific offerings of the second half, fans of both nations probably couldn’t wait for the final whistle. When it was blown, Peseiro would have already had plenty of time to contemplate possible future changes, and in the aftermath he conceded that his 4-2-3-1 formation had been a mistake.

One wonders what he’ll have in mind for the upcoming clash in Mérida with Paraguay. It may only be the second game, but a considerable number of home victories will be essential for Venezuela if they are to have any chance of reaching Qatar in two years’ time. Some fans will be able to recall that this very same fixture was actually the first one in the last campaign five years ago; it ended in embarrassment owing to a late defensive mix-up, leaving many deflated upon the first puncture.

Although qualification certainly won’t be secured or squandered at this early stage, to at least quiet down some early discontent, Peseiro really needs to inject a clearer purpose into his team on Tuesday and, hopefully, gain a result.

Team Selections

Colombia (4-1-2-2-1): C. Vargas; S. Arias (S. Medina, 13′), Y. Mina, D. Sánchez, J. Mojica; W. Barrios; J. Cuadrado (A. Morelos, 59′), J. Lerma; J. Rodríguez (S. Alzate, 74′), L. Muriel (F. Fabra, 59′); D. Zapata (R. Falcao, 74′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, W. Ángel, J. Chancellor, R. Rosales (R. Feltscher, 79′); T. Rincón, Y. Herrera; J. Murillo (Juanpi, 82′), J. Savarino (R. Otero, 67′), D. Machís (C. Cásseres Jr., 78′); S. Córdova (A. Ponce, 67′).

Darren

@DarrenSpherical

Colombia 0-0 Venezuela – International Friendly (10 September 2019)

Little to see or learn in Tampa. Nevertheless, @DarrenSpherical is here to dutifully recount La Vinotinto’s friendly encounter with Colombia.

International Friendly

Tuesday 10 September 2019 – Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Florida, USA

Colombia 0-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Colombia 0-0 Venezuela, International Friendly, 10 September 2019 (YouTube)

Uncompetitive Venezuela Struggle to Dreary Draw With Vecinos

On a patchy NFL-marked pitch, Rafael Dudamel’s somewhat experimental side was anything but buccaneering as they failed to thrill against Carlos Queiroz’s much-changed Colombia.

Viewed context-free on paper, the draw could be perceived as representing progress on the 2-1 defeat this time last year, though witnesses to this bore-chore will beg to differ. After all, not only were there nine changes to the line-up of Los Cafeteros but, as Dudamel insinuated post-match, the majority of the Venezuelans given opportunities – due to the absences of Rondón, Rincón, Rosales and others – failed to take them.

Indeed, aside from the closing stages when some more eager substitutes had entered the fray, the burgundy boys rarely threatened Álvaro Montero’s goal. Instead it was Colombia who had the lion’s share of the ball, particularly in the first half in which they regularly caused concerns in and around the Venezuelan area.

The first of these came in the ninth minute when a corner was knocked away by goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez, but only to Bournemouth’s Jefferson Lerma, whose first-time effort went a little too close to the crossbar for comfort. Five minutes later the net perhaps should have been bulging after Yairo Moreno dinked a ball to Rafael Santos Borré at the back post, but the River Plate striker mis-timed the bounce and skied his attempted placement well over the bar. Soon afterwards in the 16th minute, a corner led to a scramble which Óscar Murillo redirected goalwards, but his low effort was thwarted by the legs of Faríñez.

Venezuela’s defensive lines were regularly finding themselves bypassed and given the runaround. In the 27th minute, Juventus’ Juan Cuadrado gained space from Juanpi to come in from the left and strike a right-footed effort that went narrowly wide into the side-netting. Ten minutes later, it was Cristian Borja who was granted too much room on the left of the area as he struck a venomous effort that mercifully missed the target. Off the back of this on the other side, Luis Díaz was able to strike from an acute angle, though Faríñez comfortably diverted the ball wide. Rounding off this series of goal-threats, two minutes before half-time the Colombia-based goalkeeper of Millonarios was a little more concerned as a low free-kick from León midfielder Moreno whistled just wide of the post.

Shortly before the interval, Venezuela finally made their attacking presence known. On the left, Yeferson Soteldo’s free-kick that swung into the area was headed on by captain-for-the-night Wilker Ángel, forcing Montero to tip the ball over.

Understandably, Venezuela made a couple of changes at the break and though the second-half play was to prove to be less one-sided, Colombia were nevertheless quick to generate a great chance to open the scoring. This time, in the 51st minute, Cuadrado menaced the Venezuelan backline before sliding the ball to Santos Borré in space in the area. Yet, the 23-year-old striker, though he managed to dink an effort over the outrushing Faríñez, perhaps should have done better as the ball – which glanced off the goalkeeper’s glove – was probably going wayward before safety-first Ángel headed it out.

Colombia’s next chance of note came in the 62nd minute when Díaz raced into space on the inside-left. A goal seemed inevitable yet the Porto youngster appeared to overrun it as he strode too close to Faríñez before finally attempting to square it to a team-mate; instead, his pass was easily cleared and he himself ended up clattering into the goalkeeper.

These two opportunities were as good as the half got for Queiroz’s men, with the subsequent 20 minutes very low on opportunities. When, however, some threats did re-emerge, they instead came from Dudamel’s men as some substitutes helped the team show some belated impetus late on. First of all in the 82nd minute, Darwin Machís took it upon himself to impressively burst past two players on the left before knocking in a testing low cross from the byline which Montero had to parry out to be sure. Later on, Rómulo Otero, returning to the side having been left out of the Copa América squad, made himself hard to ignore from set-pieces. Indeed, although his much-anticipated attempt in the last minute of regulation time went into the wall, he nearly won the match with another effort in the fourth minute of stoppage time. This came from thirty yards out on the left, delivered with his right and with trademark deadly dip, forcing Montero into a desperate and eye-catching parry before it could creep in at the near post.

Alas, there was no late steal here, with the game ending goalless. Overall, not disastrous, just tedious; an unadventurous, uninmaginative draw. Perhaps only the returning Otero and Ángel will feel in any way emboldened by their performances.

Ultimately, fans looking for drama should have just skipped the game and waited for the post-match comments. Indeed, although Rafael Dudamel attended to his media duties, the players did not, provoking anger from several broadcasters on Twitter. Stirring the pot, the Venezuela’s football federation (FVF) responded to this by releasing a statement distancing themselves, claiming that such decisions were taken by those directly in charge of the team (the manager and his coaching staff). To this, the national team’s Twitter account got involved, instead proportioning blame to the match organisers. They stated – amongst other things – that La Vinotinto‘s changing room was just 20 metres from their team bus, whereas the media mixed zone was off-route, some 200 metres away on the other side of the ground, nearer to the Colombian changing room. Needless to say, the soundbite-chasers who had travelled thousands of miles were not moved by these protestations.

This is just the latest chapter of an ongoing internal saga. Things are clearly not healthy in the Vinotinto camp and this is unlikely to be the last time that divisions bubble up to the surface, causing fans to roll their erstwhile optimistic eyes.

Team Selections

Colombia (4-3-2-1): A. Montero; L. Orejuela, D. Sánchez (J. Lucumí, 56′), Ó. Murillo, C. Borja; J. Lerma, J. Cuadrado (J. Campuzano, 57′), Y. Moreno (M. Uribe, 74′); O. Berrío (L. Muriel, 71′), L. Díaz (R. Martínez, 71′); R. Santos Borré (D. Zapata, 71′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Feltscher (R. Hernández, 46′), W. Ángel, M. Villanueva, L. Mago (B. Añor, 56′); Y. Herrera, J. Añor (D. Machís, 46′), J. Moreno (B. Manzano, 85′); J. Murillo (J. Savarino, 73′), Y. Soteldo (R. Otero, 77′); J. Hurtado.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical