Tag Archives: Jhon Chancellor

USA 0-3 Venezuela – International Friendly (9 June 2019)

The dress rehearsals finish with a flourish and the stage is ready for Saturday’s premiere! Below, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto‘s final pre-Copa América warm-up clash against the USA.

International Friendly

Sunday 9 June 2019 – Nippert Stadium, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

USA 0-3 Venezuela

Video Highlights of USA 0-3 Venezuela, International Friendly, 9 June 2019 (YouTube)

Rondón Breaks Record In First-Half Romp

Salomón Rondón struck twice and had a hand in another goal to blitz the USA as well as become Venezuela’s all-time leading goalscorer.

El Gladiador’s 24-goal haul now puts him one above the legendary Juan Arango and, coming off the back of two underwhelming results, the clinical performance of the team in the opening 45 minutes will come as a welcome boost to the entire set-up.

Against an admittedly under-strength USA side, coach Rafael Dudamel fielded eight of the starters from the 3-1 Mexico defeat, making some defensive adjustments as well as bringing in the eye-catching Jefferson Savarino, who netted the other goal.

After some initial USA pressure, it was the Real Salt Lake forward who had Venezuela’s first chance of note in the 12th minute when he struck a dipping diagonal effort that went not too far over Zack Steffen’s crossbar. Four minutes later, the goalkeeper was the prime culprit behind La Vinotinto taking the lead as his disastrous clearance was punished with a trio of deadly touches: Yangel Herrera immediately knocked the ball back into the area, where Jhon Murillo nudged it to Rondón, who swiftly made it 1-0.

15 minutes later, the Premier League marksman glanced on a throw-in that Savarino picked up, first curling a left-footed shot against the post, then anticipating the rebound on the other side of the goalkeeper to make it 2-0. A fine one-two, in every sense.

Throughout the half, the hosts did actually see a lot of the ball and were occasionally a threat from crosses – perhaps never more so than in the 34th minute. Here, a low ball from the right was cut out by Roberto Rosales, only to be struck first-time by Weston McKennie whose shot ended up sliding off agonisingly wide following an important stop from Wuilker Faríñez.

Such moments just made Venezuela’s finishing seem all the more devastating. Particularly so just two minutes later when a rare exhibition of connected, purposeful interplay ended with Tomás Rincón knocking the ball towards Rondón. Through characteristic muscle and assertion, the No. 23 on 23 shrugged off a defender, did a stepover and feinted to go one way before firing low to ascend to the historic plateau of 24 international goals for the Venezuelan national team.

After all this, the second half could only be a letdown. Not just for Venezuela – who, aside from a Rincón effort that curled just wide, were quiet – but also for the USA, who created several opportunities but had the killer instinct of a lifelong pacifist. Indeed, although they exposed the Venezuelan back-line – particularly on Luis Mago’s side as well as in the middle – nobody was able to finish off chances that often arrived from point-blank range. In the 53rd minute a cross from the right whistled across the box without much contact, then later a 68th-minute from the same side should have been converted by either of the two players who had opportunities to cut the deficit but neither made meaningful connections. When, in the 78th minute, a flicked-on corner destined for a player to knock in at the back post instead ended up with a team-mate colliding into him, this seemed to sum up the hosts’ day.

Things could have been quite different had they taken these and some other chances. In particular, a fine curled effort from Jordan Morris that went just wide, a close-range Paul Arriola strike that Faríñez dramatically blocked and a late poked effort also from Arriola that somehow evaded the target. Instead, it was Venezuela, spearheaded by record-holding Rondón, who walked away from Cincinnati with their heads held high.

With one win to add to their preceding defeat and draw, it was a heartening way to end their rather mixed tour of the USA before embarking upon the flight to Porto Alegre.

There, awaits the 2019 edition of the Copa América and it has been announced that well-travelled Colombian manager Francisco “Pacho” Maturana (ex-Atlético Nacional, Colombia, Atlético Madrid, Peru, Ecuador – amongst many others) will also be in the camp as part of the coaching staff.

He will surely know as much as any observer not to get too carried away by the victory against what was a USA absent of some of its biggest names. Rather, surely amongst the main coaching concerns will be selecting and organising the personnel of the defence; to a lesser extent, there likely will also be some debate as to whether or not Savarino has done enough to earn himself a start against Peru on Saturday.

Whether or not the MLS starlet ultimately gets the nod, he has certainly got more chance of making the line-up than Yeferson Soteldo (late replacement of injured Adalberto Peñaranda), who is scheduled to join up with the squad just two days before their opening group game.

With such a momentous challenge on the horizon, there may not be much time for the players to celebrate, but many fans will certainly spare a moment to toast not only the historic feat of Rondón but also that of the team: this 3-0 victory was La Vinotinto‘s first-ever senior victory over the United States of America.

To find out more about Venezuela’s Copa América preparations, please return to this website for an in-depth preview as well as follow @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

USA (4-3-3): Z. Steffen; N. Lima, A. Long (W. Zimmerman, 46′), M. Miazga, T. Ream (D. Lovitz, 78′); W. Trapp, W. McKennie (D. Holmes, 62′), C. Roldan; P. Arriola, G. Zardes (J. Altidore, 46′), T. Boyd (J. Morris, 62′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Rosales (R. Hernández, 46′), J. Chancellor, M. Villanueva, L. Mago; J. Moreno, Y. Herrera (A. Figuera), T. Rincón (J. Martínez, 60′); J. Murillo (D. Machís, 65′), J. Savarino (J. Añor, 65′); S. Rondón (L. Seijas, 78′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Ecuador 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (1 June 2019)

Not everyone has yet arrived, but Venezuela’s Copa América preparations certainly have. Below, @DarrenSpherical recounts their opening USA-based friendly.

International Friendly

Saturday 1 June 2019 – Hard Rock Stadium, Miami Gardens, Florida, USA

Ecuador 1-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Ecuador 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 1 June 2019 (YouTube)

Rosales’ Rapture Ennered at the Death

A stoppage-time goal by Enner Valencia denied a makeshift La Vinotinto victory in Miami in their first of three Copa América warm-up encounters.

Manager Rafael Dudamel, deprived of eight of his final 23-man squad owing to the game being held on a non-FIFA date, fielded a side which included some individuals who have been omitted from the final cut. Two of these, youngsters Nahuel Ferraresi and Jan Hurtado, were given starting berths, with substitute appearances being granted to Renzo Zambrano, Jhonder Cádiz, Bernaldo Manzano, Erickson Gallardo and Samuel Sosa – the latter three, incidentally, making their senior international debuts.

Of the surprisingly physical early exchanges, captain-for-the-night Roberto Rosales had the best Venezuelan chance, when in the ninth minute he pounced on a loose ball outside the area to dip a well-struck right-footed effort over the bar. Three minutes later, the Ecuadorians made their attacking presence known, as defensive uncertainty led to a header suddenly being presented for Romario Ibarra, whose instinctive nodded effort went just wide of the target. Shortly afterwards, La Vinotinto found themselves in another similar pickle as Jhon Chancellor’s poor header fell into the path of Manchester United’s Antonio Valencia, whose shot from an acute angle went just wide of Rafael Romo’s far post.

For the rest of the opening third of the game, Venezuela’s response consisted of little more than a couple of bustling runs from Hurtado. However, come the 38th minute, following a handball from a Ronald Hernández cross, Dudamel’s men had a penalty, which the shaven-headed Rosales stepped up to take. Although goalkeeper Alexander Domínguez got a touch, the experienced full-back scored his first international goal – barely two months after also finding the net in March’s unofficial friendly with Catalonia.

However, if Venezuela slightly edged the first half then the second half was Ecuador’s. They were not far off scoring just two minutes after the restart, as a ball into the area found Carlos Garcés, but the forward was unable to divert it goalwards and the chance was lost.

For the rest of the half, without threatening a great deal, Hernán Darío Gómez’s men looked the more organised of the two units, a fact perhaps partly due to the greater number of substitutions carried out by his Venezuelan counterpart.

It would be very generous to describe the majority of attempts that followed as even half-chances, but this state of affairs changed just as Venezuela thought they were slogging to victory. Indeed, in the first minute of stoppage-time, sudden dispossession in midfield led to eagle-eyed Ayrton Preciado playing in ex-West Ham striker Valencia who clinically pounced to level the score.

Overall, it was a fair outcome to a largely unmemorable game. Venezuela never really clicked and their central defence provided a few jittery moments, but – they will surely tell themselves – they did not lose and they have two more preparation games to settle into a more effective rhythm.

For the first of these, on Wednesday against Mexico, with the exception of the injured Rolf Feltscher – whose place is being temporarily filled by Pablo Bonilla – La Vinotinto will have all of their final 23-man squad available. With the game being played at the stadium of Atlanta United, the current home of incoming hotshot Josef Martínez as well as the former residence of new El Tri manager, Tata Martino, this promises to be a more captivating encounter.

To keep up-to-date with how things transpire in the remainder of Venezuela’s Copa América warm-up as well as the tournament itself, please keep checking back here as well as pay a visit to @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

Ecuador (4-2-3-1-1): A. Domínguez; J. Quintero, G. Achilier, B. Caicedo, P. Velasco; J, Intriago, J. Orejuela; A. Valencia (A. Preciado, 69′), R. Ibarra (E. Valencia, 69′); L. Chicaiza; C. Garcés (R. Ibarra, 69′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): R. Romo; R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, N. Ferraresi, R. Rosales; A. Figuera (B. Manzano, 90′), Y. Herrera (R. Zambrano, 67′), L. Seijas (J. Añor, 79′); J. Murillo (E. Gallardo, 83′), A. Peñaranda (S. Sosa, 46′); J. Hurtado (J. Cádiz, 46′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – June 2019 Preview

With Copa América 2019 on the horizon, the official 23-man squad has been announced, although not everyone is currently in the USA for the three-match warm-up tour. To become more familiar with the Venezuelan orbit, @DarrenSpherical provides an update on the current state-of-play.

International Friendlies

Saturday 1 June 2019 – Hard Rock Stadium, Miami Gardens, Florida, USA

Ecuador vs Venezuela

Wednesday 5 June 2019 – Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Mexico vs Venezuela

Sunday 9 June 2019 – Nippert Stadium, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

USA vs Venezuela

Peñaranda

Adalberto Peñaranda has some doubters to win over. (FVF)

Mixed Response to Squad Announcement Ahead of Testing Friendlies

Rómulo Otero, Yeferson Soteldo, Jan Hurtado and Alexander González head a list of considerable Venezuelan talents who will not be present in Brazil at the upcoming 46th edition of Copa América.

Ahead of a three-game warm-up tour of the USA, these names and more were omitted from Rafael Dudamel’s final 23-man squad. They were culled from an initial 40-man convocatoria that had been announced on 10 May – despite many players on that list never having been afforded the opportunity to physically be part of the set-up.

It thus appears that Dudamel – whose position was in doubt two months ago but who has since been ratified to continue – had largely made up his mind a while ago and, as is to be expected, not all of his choices have been greeted with unanimous approval. In particular, some were not convinced by the coach’s comments ostensibly justifying the exclusion of Santos No. 10 Soteldo on the inability to secure for him a US visa in time, thus rendering him absent for the build-up. Flimsy pretext or not, those following La Vinotinto over the past year should have not been too surprised, as the diminutive dribbler has, for a variety of reasons, missed call-ups and only played for less than half an hour. That said, one of his positional rivals who avoided the chop, Adalberto Peñaranda, has played even less and, more disconcertingly, only chalked up two FA Cup appearances last season for his club side, Watford. However, it appears that Dudamel is a big believer in the peroxide-blonde attacker. This is, after all, not the first time that he has held out an olive branch to the player who outshone Soteldo – as well as most of his team-mates – as part of 2017’s history-making Under-20 Silver Generation.

No explanations have yet been articulated regarding the other omissions. However, in the case of the eye-grabbing Otero, rightly or wrongly, it is possible that Dudamel was not convinced that his individualistic tendencies could be effectively harnessed within his system. Yet, with his swirling long-range strikes and occasional set-piece brilliance, to some it feels that a potential game-changer has been left behind.

As for Hurtado, since his return to club football eight months ago following an acrimonious hiatus, the striker has rose in stature. However, as well as strong competition from the in-form Fernando Aristeguieta (América de Cali, Colombia), his non-inclusion may be owing to his inexperience (he is still only 19), questionable discipline (two red cards with the Under-20s earlier this year) and relatively low goals tally.

Yet sespite this momentary setback, one feels that Hurtado’s time shall come – quite possibly as early as next year at 2020’s Argentina/Colombia co-hosted extravaganza. For now, however, he does have at least one more chance to show his boss what he is going be missing. Indeed, he is one of eight young/fringe players currently based in Miami who won’t be going to Brazil but who are nevertheless part of the 23-man squad set to play Ecuador on the first day of June. According to the FVF’s press releases, the other seven are: Pablo Bonilla (Portuguesa), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Erickson Gallardo (Zamora FC), Bernaldo Manzano (Deportivo Lara), Samuel Sosa (Talleres de Córdoba, Argentina), Renzo Zambrano (Portland Timbers, USA) and Jhonder Cádiz (Vitória Setúbal, Portugal).

This curious situation is due to this game being played on a non-FIFA date. Afterwards, however, despite some of their club seasons still being contested, the likes of Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia), Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA), Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA), Darwin Machís (Cádiz, Spain, on loan from Udinese, Italy) and Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA) should gradually show their faces.

With two subsequent warm-up games lined up against Gold Cup-eyeing Mexico and USA, Venezuela have quite the competitive friendly guantlet to navigate their way through. As things stand, the consensus is that only one or two of the starting places are up for grabs. Indeed, based on the friendlies played since last September, with everyone available Dudamel would ideally opt to field his charges in a flexible 4-3-2-1 formation. In this system, Faríñez undoubtedly wears the gloves and the left-back is odds-on to be right-footed Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain), with one of the two central defenders being Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal). As Wilker Ángel is injured, Osorio is likely to be partnered by either Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar) or Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain), although surprise inclusion Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA) has an outside shot, given that Dudamel has praised the experienced Swiss-born player’s “versatility“. That said, with no González to vye with, he perhaps has a greater chance of dislodging 21-year-old Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), seemingly the current front-runner to start at right-back.

Further up the park, things appear more concrete: a tight midfield three is predicted to consist of captain Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), along with Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England) and Moreno. Ahead of them are likely to be the defence-terrorisers Machís and Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal) who, in turn, should be just behind Newcastle United’s 2018/19 Player of the Season, Salomón Rondón.

Yet, three games can be a long time in football and with the potential for injuries as well as high-calibre talents such as Martínez and Savarino lurking in the wings, more than a few purported certainties could well appear misplaced come mid-June.

To keep track of how things develop, please keep checking back to this website as well as @DarrenSpherical for updates.

Venezuela Squad for Copa América 2019

Ven2019CopaAmerica

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia), Joel Graterol (Zamora FC) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar), Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Palestino, Chile), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain) & Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Huesca, on loan from Málaga, Spain), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Cádiz, Spain, on loan from Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Adalberto Peñaranda (Watford, England), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA) & Luis Manuel Seijas (Santa Fe, Colombia).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (América de Cali, Colombia), Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA), Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England).

 

Venezuela Squad for Friendly against Ecuador

Ven2019Ecuador

Goalkeepers

Joel Graterol (Zamora FC) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Pablo Bonilla (Portuguesa), Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Palestino, Chile), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain) & Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Huesca, on loan from Málaga, Spain), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), Erickson Gallardo (Zamora FC), Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Bernaldo Manzano (Deportivo Lara), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Adalberto Peñaranda (Watford, England), Luis Manuel Seijas (Santa Fe, Colombia), Samuel Sosa (Talleres de Córdoba, Argentina) & Renzo Zambrano (Portland Timbers, USA).

Forwards

Jhonder Cádiz (Vitória Setúbal, Portugal), Jan Carlos Hurtado (Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata, Argentina), Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Catalonia 2-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (25 March 2019)

La Vinotinto departed the Spanish capital to head north to a very proud and rebellious autonomous region. Here, @DarrenSpherical recalls the events of an atmospheric night in Girona…

International Friendly

Monday 25 March 2019 – Estadi Montilivi, Girona, Catalonia, Spain

Catalonia 2-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Catalonia 2-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 25 March 2019 (YouTube)

Vinotinto Denied at the Death

In what could well turn out to be Rafael Dudamel’s last game in charge, a Venezuelan national team that featured several changes from the glorious 3-1 victory over Argentina was ultimately undone by a late Catalonian winner.

Salomón Rondón was one of four players replaced in the line-up, though particularly in the first half, La Vinotinto performed very much on a similar level to their well-experienced opponents.

In front of a boisterous crowd, the game started at a healthy pace, with the first moments of note coming in the ninth minute when Sevilla’s Aleix Vidal put in a couple of testing crosses that were both narrowly thwarted in the area.

Five minutes later, Venezuela came alive in the final third when Yeferson Soteldo – here, given the nod ahead of Darwin Machís – cut inside and fired a rapid right-footed strike that goalkeeper Edgar Badía parried low. Immediately afterwards, Roberto Rosales picked up the rebound, knocking it across the goalmouth where it only just evaded Rondón’s replacement Josef Martínez in the middle. However, it instead fell on the right in the area to Jhon Murillo, who lashed a fearsome effort that crashed back off the crossbar.

Murillo often sought to make things happen and later in the 24th minute he did also fashion himself another, albeit considerably softer, chance, as his effort from the edge of the area floated into the goalkeeper’s arms.

A few minutes later back up the other end, the hosts were not far from taking the lead when a cross fell to Joan Jordán, whose low drive fortuitously ricocheted off a ground-bound Jhon Chancellor and trickled out for a corner.

Barely a minute later, it was again Venezuela’s turn to go close. This time, Murillo bustled past an opponent on the right to play a fine cross into the centre where Rosales, five yards out and odds-on to score, saw his strike hit the inside of the post and go back in Murillo’s direction.

In the 36th minute, the hosts themselves got involved with the woodwork action as captain Gerard Piqué curled a fine free-kick that clipped the crossbar. Not to be outdone, five minutes later fellow La Liga defender Rosales again beat the goalkeeper but not his apparatus by also connecting with the top beam from a long-range set-piece effort.

Thus, when the two sides withdrew for the break, although the scoreboard read 0-0, with regard to the goal framework, Venezuela were 3-1 up on hits.

The restart heralded the beginning of many personnel changes, with Catalonia ultimately going on to replace their entire team and Venezuela making a total of seven changes.

A few minutes into the second half, Soteldo dinked a ball to Alexander González who, in turn, crossed the ball low for Josef Martínez. Yet, the Atlanta forward could not quite pull the trigger in time as Oriol Romeu intervened for a corner.

However, in the 53rd minute, the South Americans found themselves chasing the game. Here, hot Barcelona prospect Riqui Puig played an incisive ball into the area and no Venezuelan picked up the run of Brighton’s Martín Montoya. Thus, he rounded substitute goalkeeper Rafael Romo, with fellow Camp Nou-graduate-turned-British-resident Bojan Krkić finishing the move off.

It was not the first time the Catalans had displayed some impressive fast-paced passing and movement abilities, but it was the first time that it had paid off. However, barely five minutes later they were prevented from pushing on as a defensive mix-up gifted Venezuela an equaliser. Indeed, an innocuous ball forward was weakly headed by Montoya back towards his area, but before second-half goalkeeper Isaac Becerra could receive it, Rosales was there to pounce and nutmeg him to make it 1-1.

For the remaining half-hour or so, the game suffered somewhat due to the number of substitutions. Two of these conjured up Venezuela’s best chance of a winner in this period as Juanpi’s 62nd-minute pass into the middle was almost diverted goalwards by Fernando Aristeguieta, but the Colombia-based striker struggled to make the right connection.

In turn, Venezuelan shot-stopper Romo was on cue to parry a couple of home efforts, such as that of Javi Puado in the 68th minute and then Marc Cardona’s in the 77th.

However, there was little that the APOEL goalkeeper could do in the 88th minute. With the clock close to expiring a ball was played over from the right byline and defender Ronald Hernández stretched but could not deal with it as it fell to Puado, who maintained his composure within the area and struck home.

For the majority of elated fans, it seemed an apt end to proceedings. For Venezuela, however, while they should not be too downheartened by the result and certainly not by their overall on-field experiences in Spain, their future currently seems surprisingly precarious.

Indeed, post-game it was assistant coach Marcos Mathías who attended to the press, with Rafael Dudamel reportedly being due to meet with the football association (FVF) in order to discuss whether or not he shall continue in the role. This follows in the wake of Friday’s publicised meeting with representatives of one of the two political factions currently locked in a dispute over the running of the country, which led to the coach offering his resignation. Currently, it is unclear as to what the outcome is likely to be and, although his second-in-command instead speaking to the media feels somewhat ominous, it is possible that Dudamel merely wished to avoid the inevitable interrogation. Wishful thinking, perhaps, but right now it feels as if, on-field at least, Venezuela are onto something and, with no obvious candidate to take over, nobody wants to see any momentum squandered.

Team Selections

Catalonia (4-4-2): E. Badía (I. Becerra, 46′); A. Vidal (J. Puado, 62′), G. Piqué (R. Puig, 52′), M. Bartra (M. Montoya, 46′), D. Vilá (O. Romeu, 46′); J. Jordán (A. García, 46′), P. Pons (M. Cucurella, 46′), Á. Granell (V. Sánchez, 46′), Ó. Melendo (M. Muniesa, 46′); B. Krkic (M. Cardona, 62′) & S. García (P. Milla, 37′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Faríñez (R. Romo, 46′); A. González (R. Hernández, 78′), Y. Osorio, J. Chancellor, R. Rosales; J. Moreno, T. Rincón (L. Seijas, 46′), Y. Herrera; J. Murillo (D. Machís, 61′), Y. Soteldo (Juanpi, 61′) (J. Cádiz, 81′); J. Martínez (F. Aristeguieta, 61′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – March 2019 Preview

Four months after a pair of Asian draws, Rafael Dudamel has convened his latest squad who once again find themselves in Spain to confront a challenging friendly double-header. Here, with the Copa América already less than three months away, @DarrenSpherical has a look at the current batch hoping to stay within the manager’s plans.

International Friendly

Friday 22 March 2019 – Estadio Wanda Metropolitano, Madrid, Spain

Argentina vs Venezuela

Unofficial International Friendly

Monday 25 March 2019 – Estadi Montilivi, Girona, Catalonia, Spain

Catalonia vs Venezuela

wandametropolitano

View of the Wanda Metropolitano, Madrid. (Wikipedia)

Considerable Clashes Await Copa-eyeing Vinotinto

Perhaps not the most exciting, but certainly the most eye-catching name on manager Rafael Dudamel’s 25-man squad list is that of 32-year-old veteran Luis Manuel Seijas.

With an emphasis on youthful potential being nurtured and developed very much the order of the day, the international career of the Colombia-based Santa Fe midfielder had long seemed over. Indeed, even before the Under-20s reached the final of the 2017 World Cup, Seijas appeared to have parted ways with the national set-up, following talks with Dudamel. These statements came hot on the heels of his last and most infamous appearance in a Vinotinto shirt: 18 June 2016, Quarter-final of the Copa América Centenario. On this day against Argentina in Foxborough, Massachusetts, he made himself the object of global ridicule when his weak, sub-Panenka chipped penalty was easily caught by goalkeeper Sergio Romero.

Given this unforgettable embarrassment, many people – if they gave him any further thought at all – came to assume that he had been excommunicated indefinitely. Evidently not. Nearly three years on, where will he fit in? Although he can play on the left of midfield, a role in front of the defensive line seems more likely; alternatively, owing to the ongoing uncertainties at left-back, an experiment there does not seem entirely out of question either. All this being said, it is hard to envisage him being much more than a back-up in any of these positions but, at the very least, his 67 caps of experience could provide a mental boost in the changing room.

Elsewhere in the squad, creative midfielder Juanpi – currently loaned out by Spanish second division side Málaga to top-flight strugglers Huesca, where he plays alongside Yangel Herrera – is also set to put on the burgundy shirt for the first time in a while. November 2017 against Iran was the 25-year-old’s last outing and he will be seeking to re-establish himself as part of the long-term plans, thus delivering on the potential that some of his early club and country outings indicated.

Although cultivating the abilities of youngsters is going to be key with regard to the underlying aim of qualifying for the 2022 World Cup, only one player from the most recent crop of Under-20 talents makes it into this squad. Perhaps this is due to their ultimately unsuccessful qualifying campaign earlier this year or maybe it is simply not yet their moment. Either way, Jan Carlos Hurtado (Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata, Argentina) could well soon become a useful squad member. Indeed, the striker – who was actually also a part of the 2017 Under-20 World Cup squad – gained many plaudits at Chile 2019, due to his bustling runs, forward play and, especially, his two goals in the 2-0 win over Brazil. Although Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England) is the undisputed leading man – with Atlanta United hotshot Josef Martínez sometimes, but not always, joining him in attack – Hurtado could well develop into a more-than-capable deputy. Another man vying for this status within the current squad is the more experienced Fernando Aristeguieta, who is having a superb season in Colombia with América de Cali, so far netting 9 goals in 10 league games.

Regarding the other six, more involved, members of the 2017 silver generation squad who are present here, diminutive dribbler Yeferson Soteldo is the most noteworthy inclusion, having not played internationally for 16 months. This has not been due to any dip in form – even if he did divide opinion at Universidad de Chile, he now wears the hallowed No. 10 shirt at Santos in Brazil – but instead a combination of visa and family issues which prevented him from joining up with the most recent squads. With Adalberto Peñaranda, Romúlo Otero and Jefferson Savarino all having been omitted, he, along with Sergio Cordóva (Augsburg, Germany), will be looking to regain one of the ever-competitive attacking-midfield positions.

Their erstwhile youth-level team-mates who have also received call-ups are: versatile midfielder Yangel Herrera, right-back Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), centre-back Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay) and undisputed first-choice goalkeeper, Wuilker Fariñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia).

The coaching staff will be hoping that these young players as well as the many others who are in their early-to-mid twenties will gel effectively with the more experienced internationals, such as Rondón, captain Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) and right-back Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain). Perhaps it bodes well for the team that all three of these individuals are currently enjoying above-average goalscoring seasons with their respective clubs.

In press comments made on the eve of the first game, Dudamel curiously stated that “We are not experimenting at all. [That] stage has already passed”. Possibly he was referring to tactical systems (with a three-man midfield having been his most notable trial last year), although it is also true that the vast majority of players in this current squad also received call-ups in 2018. Thus it seems that the coach has an ever-crystallising conviction as to who will make the cut in June, albeit one that does not preclude a few latecomers from staking a claim.

Whoever gets picked and whoever ultimately shines, Venezuela have two significant confrontations on the horizon, the first of which comes on Friday when they face Lionel Messi and co. at the majestic home of Atlético Madrid. Argentina are never an inconsiderable proposition, although perhaps their dubious World Cup displays as well as the pair of draws that Venezuela achieved against them in the Russia 2018 qualification phase will offer La Vinotinto some encouragement. Then, on Monday, they will be at the home of Girona to face the non-FIFA-affiliated Catalan national side, who can count Xavi, Gerard Piqué and a host of primarily La Liga players in their ranks. With a 4-2 defeat against another autonomous region of Spain – the Basque Country, in October 2018 – still fresh in the memory, Dudamel’s men will be striving to use their superior collective preparation to their advantage. That’s certainly not something that can be said often.

Venezuela Squad

venezuelamarch2019squad

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Alexander González (Elche, Spain), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Palestino, Chile), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain) & Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Huesca, on loan from Málaga, Spain), Sergio Córdova (Augsburg FC, Germany), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Cádiz, Spain, on loan from Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Luis Manuel Seijas (Santa Fe, Colombia) & Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (América de Cali, Colombia), Jhonder Cádiz (Vitória Setúbal, Portugal), Jan Carlos Hurtado (Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata, Argentina), Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA),  Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Iran 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (20 November 2018)

Venezuela concluded their rare foray into the Asian continent on the neutral territory of Qatar. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides a match report of their latest friendly outing…

International Friendly

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran 1-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Iran 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 20 November 2018 (YouTube)

La Vinotinto Leave Asian Tour Undefeated

Rafael Dudamel’s much-changed side ended 2018’s late run of six away games with their second consecutive draw.

Contested by two sides seeking to try out new players and approaches, it was not a flair-filled end-to-end thriller, but it did nevertheless contain several significant moments.

The first of these came after nine minutes when an Irani cross found Sardar Azmoun inside of the six-yard box. Unmarked, a goal seemed certain, yet his effort from point-blank-range was miraculously diverted over the bar by the renowned prospect Wuilker Faríñez.

In the following exchanges, goalmouth action was to be in short supply, with Venezuela’s sole effort coming from an untroubling shot on the spin from Josef Martínez. That is, until the 35th minute when captain Tomás Rincón slid a ball forward that was latched onto by the left-sided Darwin Machís; in turn, the Udinese attacker cut onto his right and struck a low effort that creept under the dive of the goalkeeper.

La Vinotinto were now ahead, but they had to be on their toes. Just two minutes later following a defensive giveaway, Faríñez was again called upon, this time to parry a well-hit, though relatively comfortable, strike from Ali Gholizadeh. However, three minutes before the break the Charleroi man had more success, after the ball was robbed off Rincón and knocked into his path. From here, the forward gained space away from centre-back Jhon Chancellor and, from the edge of the area, fired clinically with his left boot past Faríñez.

Going into the break level boosted the morale of Carlos Queiroz’s men and, upon the restart, surely aided them in being much quicker out of the blocks. They were certainly more alert than right-back Ronald Hernández, who in the 49th minute was mugged of the ball by Medhi Taremi, who marched on the Venezuelan goal, but this one-on-one was once again blocked by Faríñez. Then two minutes later, a major setback appeared on the cards as Taremi was brought down in the area by Chancellor and the referee pointed to the spot. However, after consulting the pitch-side VAR monitors, the decision was reversed and Venezuela could breathe a little easier.

Subsequently, the South Americans managed to quell opposition danger with greater success and in the 64th minute, they momentarily thought that they had retaken the lead. Here, a ball suddenly found its way to the feet of Josef Martínez, who made room for  himself away from the goalkeeper and fired home, but alas, the linesman’s flag was up.

As also occurred against Japan last Friday, the game was to then suffer under the bloated weight of a high number of substitutions. However, after this lull, two more chances were created, with each being struck by Venezuelan replacements. First, in the 84th minute, Salomón Rondón took a ball in his stride and fired it across goal, causing the goalkeeper Amir Abedzadeh to pull off a decent parry. Then, two minutes from time on the inside-left within the area, Real Salt Lake’s Jefferson Savarino received a threaded ball from Luis González. Although at a slight angle, he was alone with the goalkeeper, rapidly controlling before firing, but to the frustration of a team-mate in the middle his shot went wide of the mark.

Even though he was offside, it seemed like an eminently scoreable scenario, but ultimately Dudamel’s men had to settle for another draw. On the balance of play, this was probably the fairest result and with an overall record for 2018 of two wins, two draws and two defeats, the manager can’t be too displeased. Still, he will know better than anyone that the present cycle has really only just begun and even just consolidating the team’s current level will be a task that will require negotiating with care. Indeed, at the time of writing, he will most likely have to wait until March to have another look at his full squad. In the meantime, it remains to be seen how the players will progress at their clubs and what, if any, bearing the performances of the latest Under-20 crop in the upcoming Sudamericano tournament will have on his thinking.

Team Selections

Iran (4-3-3): A. Abedzadeh; R. Rezaeian (S. Moharrami, 74′), M. Khanzadeh, S. Hosseini, M. Mohammadi; S. Ghoddos (M. Soleimani, 74′), O. Ebrahimi, V. Amiri (M. Torabi, 65′); A. Gholizadeh (S. Dejagah, 74′), S. Azmoun, M. Taremi (K. Rezaei, 81′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, W. Ángel, B. Añor; J. Moreno; S. Córdova (J. Murillo, 74′), Y. Herrera (J. Savarino, 61′), T. Rincón,  D. Machís (L. González, 81′); J. Martínez (S. Rondón, 74′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Japan 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (16 November 2018)

Venezuela’s Asian tour has got underway, with Japan the first stop. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides an account of the events in Ōita…

International Friendly

Friday 16 November 2018 – Ōita Bank Dome Stadium, Ōita, Kyushu Island, Japan

Japan 1-1 Venezuela

Goal Highlights of Japan 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 16 November 2018 (YouTube)

El General Rallies the Troops Late On

Having soaked up a considerable amount of Japanese pressure, Venezuela eventually managed to gain a draw on the first leg of their Asian tour courtesy of the first-ever international goal by captain Tomás Rincón.

The opening exchanges had a rather different complexion, however, as Rafael Dudamel’s reinforced line-up – Rincón, Júnior Moreno and the returning Yangel Herrera were all fielded in the middle – enjoyed a few notable chances. First of all, after 11 minutes, a ball ricocheted into Salomón Rondón’s path, who nudged it past debuting US-born goalkeeper Daniel Schmidt; the effort of the Newcastle striker was inches from crossing the line until defender Takehiro Tomisayu stretched to clear at the last moment.

Rondón again came close just four minutes later, following a free-kick on the right edge of the area won by the dynamic Darwin Machís. Although the Magpie’s initial attempt was blocked, he responded by lashing a fearsome left-footed strike which almost grazed Schmidt’s far post. Later in the 25th minute, Rondón played a ball on for roaming right-back Roberto Rosales who, somewhat similarly to the previous effort, also hit an effort with his less-favoured left boot that went across goal and not too far wide of the mark.

Throughout all of this, the hosts were also a threat, occasionally finding gaps, storming forward before a cross would typically be thwarted by a defender. Their first clear chance came in the 26th minute when some quick passes left the ball at the feet of Ritsu Doan, who spun and shot past goalkeeper Rafael Romo. Vinotinto hearts were in mouths, but mercifully for them, the Groningen man’s effort went narrowly wide of the post. Soon after at the half-hour mark Japan were again not far off when Takumi Minamino crossed low for Yuya Osako, though the visitors were to have 20-on-Monday Nahuel Ferraresi to thank, as he put in a sliding boot to divert out. Four minutes later, Romo was to be the momentary hero, as a defence-splitting pass forward found Shoya Nakajima whose one-on-one shot the goalkeeper manfully stood up to, diverting wide.

However, La Vinotinto could not completely stem the tide and so in the 39th minute, the hosts found the opener. Here, Nakajima’s free-kick was swung in from deep on the right and Marseille defender Hiroki Sakai met it in the air to volley home with aplomb. 1-0 and, just under two minutes before the break, Nakajima almost doubled the lead when, on the inside-left, he cut onto his right before firing low into the side-netting.

As the second half began, La Vinotinto knew they needed to get a foothold back into the match, but unfortunately for them, the hosts were in no mood to be accommodating. Subsequently, the majority of the best chances were to fall to Japan, one of which was a shot by Getafe midfielder Gaku Shibasaki that Romo parried at his near post. A few minutes later, the Samurai Blue had another opportunity when Osako slid the ball to Doan, but the latter’s effort from the left was blocked low by the goalkeeper.

Shortly afterwards the pace of the game was to be gradually diluted by the raft of substitutions, one of which was the 74th-minute introduction of international debutant, Bernardo Añor. Yet, just a minute later, the hosts were to regain some of their attacking momentum as Genki Haraguchi earned himself some space from his marker and, with some close control, danced his way into an acute spot to the left of the goal, but his attempt was greeted by the wall of Romo. The 28-year-old Cyprus-based shot-stopper has only been a part of Dudamel’s thinking since the dawn of this new cycle in September, but on the basis of his two appearances within that time, he has shown enough to be confidently described as Wuilker Faríñez’s understudy.

Despite the Japanese having the better of the game, five minutes later goalscorer Sakai was to squander his side’s on-field superiority as he clumsily brought down substitute Luis González in the area. After a delay, captain Tomás Rincón stepped up and confidently converted the penalty, bringing his side level when a defeat was beginning to seem inevitable. In the 91st minute, El General managed to rescue his side again when, following some ball-waltzing from Koya Gitagawa, he put in a perfectly-timed last-ditch challenge to slide the ball wide.

Following a header in the final throes of stoppage-time the hosts did actually have the ball in the back of the net, but a linesman’s flag quickly halted the elation in the stands. Thus, the game ended in a creditable 1-1 draw for Dudamel’s men. Although – some early first-half pressure and attempts aside – the performance left something to be desired, this result against a World Cup-level opponent in front of over 33,000 of their fans certainly feels like a respectable outcome. Fans will be hoping they can go one step further in Qatar on Tuesday, when the side face a similarly tough encounter against Carlos Queiroz’s Iran.

Team Selections

Japan (4-2-3-1): D. Schmidt; H. Sakai, M. Yoshida, T. Tomiyasu, S. Sasaki; W. Endo, G. Shibasaki; R. Doan (K. Sugimoto, 77′), T. Minamino (J. Ito, 77′), S. Nakajima (G. Haraguchi, 68′); Y. Osako (K. Kitagawa, 68′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): R. Romo; R. Rosales, N. Ferraresi, J. Chancellor, L. Mago (B. Añor, 74′); J. Moreno (J. Savarino, 90+5′); J. Murillo (L. González, 65′), Y. Herrera (A. Romero, 65′), T. Rincón, D. Machís (S. Córdova, 84′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 65′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical