Tag Archives: José Rodríguez

Panama 0-2 Venezuela – International Friendly (11 September 2018)

In their second friendly game of this international break, Venezuelans on the pitch and in the stands came together to generate a moving, memorable evening for the country. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides an account of the game as well as some thoughts…

International Friendly

Tuesday 11 September 2018 – Estadio Rommel Fernández, Panama City, Panama.

Panama 0-2 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Panama 0-2 Venezuela, International Friendly, 11 September 2018 (YouTube)

Salomón Spearheads Supersubs’ Show

Salomón Rondón came off the bench to combine twice with his fellow substitutes to give La Vinotinto a heartening, well-fought win in front of a sizeable number of their compatriots.

This victory was the first against Panama since 2000 and also the very first against any opposition in a senior friendly encounter for Rafael Dudamel in his 29 months in the job – and just his fifth overall.

Beforehand, the coach stated that he would like his side to be “not so vertical” and instead have “more time with the ball” than they had against Colombia. Although there were considerable spells where neither side could gain much command over the play, Venezuela did at least manage to assert themselves to a greater degree in what was a more inviting contest.

For the second consecutive game, Darwin Machís started with intent, driving into space and even troubling the goalkeeper with a deflected shot in the second minute. However, with six changes made to the line-up, it was to be two of his fellow attackers who garnered themselves more attention in the first half. Indeed, firstly Luis “Cariaco” González built on Friday’s promising sub appearance, outpacing opponents numerous times on the right, managing to knock in several crosses and even squeezing in an attempt or two at goal.

However, prominence-wise at least, both men were eclipsed by Rómulo Otero. Nominally fielded in the centre behind Christian Santos, he often seemed to be on a one-man mission to gain himself a regular starting place, frequently drifting into other areas, particularly the left side. His contributions were hit-and-miss, with plenty of long-range shots, crosses and set-pieces either ballooning over or cannoning off the first man, but his thrusting, do-or-die mobility did genuinely unsettle opponents and create spaces for team-mates. Two of his opening-half free-kick attempts did also hit the target: a 13th-minute right-footed curler from an impossible angle on the left caused an instinctive parry for goalkeeper Luis Mejía who was anticipating a cross and, more notably, a 43rd-minute strike from some 40 yards that bounced just before Mejía, causing him to awkwardly deflect it out with his lower ribcage.

Although there was more action around the hosts’ goal, the Central Americans led by English-Panamanian interim coach Gary Stempel were always very much in the game. Often thwarted at the moment of a key pass, they did nevertheless provide a few scares. In the 28th minute, Cristian Martínez whipped in a devilish cross which the diving goalkeeper Rafael Romo – playing his first international in seven years – got fingertips to, before Yordan Osorio’s shin awkwardly cleared for a corner. In the 36th minute, following one of many clever flicks by José Rodríguez, a shot from Martínez in a good position in the area was well-blocked by Osorio’s centre-back partner Wilker Ángel. From the subsequent Gabriel Torres corner, Venezuela perhaps received a huge let-off, as a Fidel Escobar header hit the arm of left-back Luis Mago; contrary to how it initially appeared to almost everyone, this was adjudged by the referee to be marginally outside, not inside the penalty area. A mere matter of yards from the incident, the man in black could not have had a better view. Regardless, from the resulting free-kick, Escobar gave Dudamel’s men a second fright, as his right-footed bullet arrowed barely a yard over the bar.

Thus, at half-time, both sides had good cause to feel that this open game was there for the taking and immediately after the restart, it was the 2018 World Cup qualifiers who were first out of the traps. With barely 40 seconds played, Martínez shaped up from some 30 yards, striking a fine right-footed effort which Romo’s outstretched palm had to deal with. Some seven minutes later, Venezuela trumped the home side in the long-range stakes as another Otero free-kick from 40 yards – for which a 15-yard run-up was required – dipped menacingly before Mejía, causing him to parry out wide.

Subsequently, scares were averted at both ends but when the next real attempt on goal arrived, it was made to count. This came in the 67th minute with two substitutes as the lead protagonists. First, following some neat Venezuelan play, fresh-and-fleet-footed Jefferson Savarino of Real Salt Lake played a one-two on the right with Otero, receiving back the ball inside the area to slide across the goalmouth past Román Torres where none other than Salomón Rondón knocked it into the back of the net. Celebrated by thousands of Venezuelans in attendance, it sounded as if the Premier League striker’s first international goal since March 2017 had been scored at home.

Additional changes were later made to both sides, which perhaps further diluted the attacking fluidity. Yet, despite the dearth of shots on target, the pulsing atmosphere and highly competitive pinball-esque action lended itself to an engrossing spectacle. Towards the end, however, another one of the reinforcements from the bench ensured that his spell on the pitch would be remembered.

Eduard Bello, an attacker enjoying an impressive first season with Chilean side Deportes Antofagasta, came on for his international debut in the 78th minute. Ten minutes later he earned a corner which he himself then took; Rondón connected but his header on the stretch at an angle to the goal went slightly wide of the post. Then, in the final minute of stoppage-time after a Panamanian cross and headed knock-back had been hastily cleared, a ball was hoisted upfield by captain Tomás Rincón. The defence were largely committed further upfield and so, following a fortuitous ricochet off the defender, Bello was able to swivel and slide the ball towards Rondón in space who pounced like a predator to seal the win.

The elation in the stands was palpable and afterwards at the press conference, Dudamel dedicated the win to these joy-deprived believers, many of whom would have moved to the Panamanian capital in recent years due to the well-documented domestic difficulties:

“For multiple reasons our compatriots have emigrated from our country. There is something that in life can not be lost, which is dignity. Today we wanted to give a boost to the dignity of the Venezuelan who has accompanied us and who makes life in this beautiful country. May La Vinotinto become an example for all our people – that is the invitation.”

Many observers of Russia 2018 may blithely dismiss the weight of this Venezuelan victory but nobody who experienced it can deny the importance of such a welcome morale-boost. Friday against Colombia now feels like quite some time ago. Regarding the performances, although the action was again largely disjointed and fragmented, Rondón, Otero, González, Machís, Savarino and Bello have all provided Dudamel with positive moments on which to build more sustained attacking play. As for the rearguard, while the coach may wish to try out other players for next month’s double-header in Spain, the prized clean sheet that they kept and their general solidity should give the likes of Osorio and Mago hope that a consecutive call-up will be forthcoming.

Lastly, post-match Dudamel also said that, after nearly ten months without senior matches, he hopes that his side will go on to have “no less than 15-18 games” (including however many they play at the 2019 Copa América) under their belts before the Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifiers commence. Such a number seems optimistic but if an array of seemingly insurmountable obstacles can be overcome to pull this off, it would go a considerable way towards narrowing the preparatory chasm with their major CONMEBOL rivals.

Precarious though the future most certainly is, in this international break some positive steps were undeniably taken.

Team Selections

Panama (4-3-3): L. Mejía; M. Murillo, R. Torres, F. Escobar, F. Palacios (K. Galván, 71′); C. Martínez, A. Godoy, M. Camargo (A. Carrasquilla, 65′); J. Rodríguez (J. González, 77′), R. Blackburn, G. Torres (Á. Orelien, 65′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): R. Romo; A. González, Y. Osorio, W. Ángel, L. Mago; T. Rincón, J. Moreno (A. Flores, 86′); L. González (J. Savarino, 56′), R. Otero (S. Córdova, 75′), D. Machís (E. Bello, 78′); C. Santos (S. Rondón, 56′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Uruguay 2-1 Brazil (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 2, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 2 February 2017)

The second game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 2 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw Uruguay face Brazil. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

groupstage020217

(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 2-1 Brazil

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 2 February 2017 (YouTube)

With a stoppage-time winner, Uruguay came from behind to beat Brazil to become the only side in the Hexagonal left with a 100 per cent record. Things had looked quite positive for their opponents in the 23rd minute when a David Neres pass found Guilherme Arana, who slid home past the goalkeeper for the lead. However, Uruguay got back into the match and were to have the majority of the chances; when they did find an equaliser, it came on the hour courtesy of a phenomenal long-range golazo from Rodrigo Amaral. Subsequently, Uruguay searched for the winner and were aided by two Brazil defenders getting sent off: Lucas Cunha in 67th minute and Lyanco in the 90th. Not too long after the second one, Facundo Waller hoisted a ball back upfield which Matías Viña managed to beat the goalkeeper to and dramatically win the game for Uruguay, who sit rather pretty atop the Hexagonal with six points.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

Once again, praise can be heaped upon Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay), who not only scored again but was more involved than he was against Argentina. In the 15th minute, he played through Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid) into the area, though the latter’s shot from a slight angle was blocked out. Another chance was to be created from the subsequent corner as this was played in by Amaral and headed by defender Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) against the top of the crossbar. However, if you want something done properly, then sometimes you’ve got to do it yourself, as Amaral spectacularly demonstrated in the 60th minute to get Uruguay level. After Schiappacasse headed on a pass centrally some 30 yards out, Amaral quickly put the ball onto his left and let rip with a sensational golazo that went in off the far post – he is again joint top-scorer on five goals with Argentina’s Marcelo Torres. This goal didn’t stop him trying to get his team-mates on the scoresheet, however, as in the 70th minute his free-kick found the head of Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors, Argentina), but alas, his effort went wide. Eight minutes later, perhaps a better chance was provided when he slid the ball to Schiappacasse on the left inside the area; the goalkeeper came out and the striker managed the squeeze the ball past him in to the middle, but unfortunately for the Uruguay striker, a defender’s block directed the ball back to the goalkeeper.

Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) was another man who wasn’t short of attempts to both score and gain an assist. His first effort came in the 11th minute when, from the left about 15 yards from the byline, he tried to curl an impossible right-footed shot; to his credit, he got a fair bit of power on it as it dipped awkwardly for the goalkeeper, who tipped over. In the 33rd minute, he controlled a ball on the edge of the area but his shot, always rising, went over. Ten minutes later, Schiappacasse nabbed the ball just outside the area and gave it to De La Cruz who, from the edge of the dee, curled a left-footed shot low that the goalkeeper saved. Much later in the 67th minute immediately after Brazil had suffered their first dismissal, De La Cruz took the subsequent free-kick from an inside-right position just outside the area; he managed to get a wicked bend on it with his right foot, causing the goalkeeper to tip over. Seven minutes later, José Rodríguez (No. 4, Danubio) on the right played a ball towards the area that deflected back to De La Cruz on the edge who whacked a left-footed effort that went not too far over. The last chance of note De La Cruz had was also the one with which he came closest; indeed, in the 86th minute, he won a free-kick about 22 yards out on the inside-right and managed to hit a right-footed effort that came back off the near post.

One other, lesser moment involving De La Cruz was the good work he did in the 75th minute shrugging off a challenge then passing on the edge of the area to a team-mate who had a low shot comfortably saved. This compatriot was Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) who, once again, made some less ostentatious but all-the-same vital contributions. In the 71st minute he struck an audacious effort from 35 yards that dipped tantalisingly, though ultimately down into the roof of the net. However, in stoppage-time he truly came up with some goods as, from the halfway line, he hoisted the ball back to the edge of the area, which found Matías Viña (No. 17, Nacional). Profiting from a dreadfully out-of-place goalkeeper, Viña was able to easily slide home for the win and cause pandemonium amongst his team-mates, both on the pitch and at the sidelines.

brazilflag Brazil

New Ajax-signing David Neres (No. 11, Ajax) had a couple of moments of note. The first one occurred after nine minutes when a team-mate outjumped the Uruguayan goalkeeper to a chipped ball and it fell to Neres who controlled with his upper body before volleying wildly over, when there was only really a defender in his way. However, he made up for this some 15 minutes later when, from a central position, he played a fine left-footed through-ball that Guilherme Arana (No. 6, Corinthians) latched onto and then stroked home to give Brazil the lead. This was the second consecutive game in which Arana scored with Neres playing a role in his goal.

Compared to Uruguay though, Brazil barely had any other chances worth mentioning, with perhaps one minor exception being a 79th minute pass from Lucas Paqueta (No. 10, Flamengo) to Léo Jabá (No. 19, Corinthians) in the area, though his shot from an angle on the right went into the side-netting.

Otherwise, Brazil will be concerned that they will be going into their next game without two of their regular defenders, following the red cards to Lucas Cunha (No. 3, Braga, Portugal) and Lyanco (No. 4, São Paulo). Another worry will be the goalkeeping position, as the usual first-choice Caíque was dropped, presumably for some shaky moments in the preceding game as well as during some others. However, his replacement Lucas Perri (No. 1, São Paulo) was surely to blame for the Uruguay equaliser, as he was hopelessly out of position when Waller’s ball was pumped up to the edge of his area. Thus, a decision has to be made.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 2 were Colombia vs Argentina and Ecuador vs Venezuela – talent-spotting articles have now been published for both of these matches.

Otherwise, Matchday 3 of the Hexagonal will be on 5 February 2017 and the games shall be Brazil vs Venezuela, Uruguay vs Colombia and Ecuador vs Argentina – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Day 8 – 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20 (Venezuela 0-0 Bolivia & Uruguay 2-0 Peru)

On the eighth day of the 2017 edition of the prestigious U-20 South American Youth Championship, attention turned back to Group B, with Venezuela taking on Bolivia and Uruguay facing Peru. Below are video highlights, brief summaries of each game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting…

groupb25117

(Source: Wikipedia)

Venezuela 0-0 Bolivia

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 25 January 2017 (YouTube)

Although this must-win game for Venezuela ended goalless, were it to be judged on Golden Opportunities Wasted, they would have roared to at least a 7-2 hammering. The main culprit of the first half was José Balza, who missed two gilt-edged chances; soon after the interval he was replaced by Yeferson Soteldo, whose presence seemed to spark life into both sides. Indeed, around the hour-mark, a previously insipid game became very much end-to-end, with Bolivia twice nearly making their opponents pay for their profligacy. Nevertheless, it was Venezuela who were the elite goalmouth villains here, with Ronaldo Peña, in particular, guilty of haplessly missing a hat-trick of chances; on two of these occasions, he was presented with near-open goals. Thus, Bolivia somehow survived and could well afford to lose their final match against Uruguay and yet still qualify for the Hexagonal. Venezuela, on the other hand, may rue their collective squandering for a long time as they will need a result against Argentina – and, if they can only manage a draw, require Bolivia to lose – in order to progress.

Talent Spotting

venezuelaflag Venezuela

With Benfica and Manchester City target Yangel Herrera suspended and Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) starting on the bench, it was difficult to see how Venezuela were going to undo the Bolivian back-line. Consequently, the first half was a little flat, though the burgundy boys did nevertheless manage to create at least two clear scoring opportunities; however, Soteldo’s introduction in the 52nd minute certainly increased the tempo and creativity. Doubts had been raised pre-game about the diminutive dribbler’s temperament and decision-making but he can’t be faulted for the stalemate here, as he played a part in three of his side’s five further chances in the second half. Elsewhere on the field, Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) took his chance with his first start by setting up some opportunities from crosses and, similarly, Heber García (No. 14. Deportivo La Guaira) also provided some invention. With more mixed results, Sergio Córdova (No. 23, Caracas FC) could at times be another effective threat.

However, departing from the usual structure somewhat, rather than detailing all of the most noteworthy players’ eye-catching contributions, what follows is a list of the seven key chances squandered. Supplemented by a perusal of the video highlights, acclaim and condemnation shouldn’t be hard to apportion.

1) 7th min: From the right, Lucena put in a fine cross that José Balza (No. 7, Carabobo) easily out-jumped the goalkeeper for, yet couldn’t direct his header beneath the crossbar, instead seeing it go over.

2) 13th min: On the inside-right, Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas, Spain) did well to play on a ball for Balza to latch onto in the area; however, the first-time starter amateurishly screwed a dreadful attempt well off-target, when a competent professional would have been expected to at least make the goalkeeper work for a save.

3) 54th min: Fresh to the pitch, Yeferson Soteldo received a nice touch by Peña on the left side of the area before giving a defender the runaround one way and then another. He made space for himself to be able to lay the ball to Córdova some 12 yards out yet, though the Caracas FC man had three Bolivians in his eye-line, he really should have done better than the pathetic attempt that scuffed wide.

4) 60th min: Córdova went some way towards atoning for this when he worked his way past two players on the right before sliding the ball across the goalmouth, gifting Peña what was easily the best opportunity. However, from barely four yards out, the Las Palmas youngster air-kicked what was meant to be a right-footed tap-in and the ball instead embarrassingly rebounded against his left heel and up into the air, leading to a fruitless scramble.

5) 78th min: From the right edge of the area with his left boot, García knocked in a low bouncing ball that found its way through to the back post towards Peña and Soteldo. However, despite the latter’s close proximity, Peña maintained his focus on the ball’s trajectory as it came over to him, yet somehow nevertheless missed what should have been a low header at the back post past the goalkeeper.

6) 84th min: Goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) rapidly began a move with a great throw up the right flank towards Soteldo, who did brilliantly to dash past an opponent and ultimately dink in a ball from the byline. Lucena cushion-headed this back to Peña, yet to nobody’s surprise, instead of bulging the net with a 15-yard half-volley, he saw his horrible miscue go high and wide. Faith in Peña, who had earned many plaudits for his harrying and hassling against Uruguay, was virtually non-existent at this point; perhaps he is more effective playing a support role, connecting attackers and pressuring opponents into errors, rather than being gift-wrapped chances to make some howlers of his own.

7) 93rd min: With one last throw of the dice, Soteldo slid through Antonio Romero (No. 19, Deportivo Lara) on the inside-right of the area. However, despite only having the goalkeeper to beat, instead of composing himself, he leant back and stretched somewhat when connecting with the ball; thus, his shot, with a fatalistic air of predictably, went wide of the near post.

These were the most exasperating opportunities, though some may wish to add to the list the 27th-minute header that Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas) awkwardly, back-to-goal, knocked over from another good Lucena free-kick.

Ultimately, though Venezuela will be grateful for the return of captain Herrera to bolster attacks whilst shoring things up defensively against Argentina on Friday, they face an uphill task before one even begins to worry about chances being finished off. Indeed, their opponents are comfortably the highest-scorers in the competition and may well expose Venezuela’s defensive record (one conceded – also the tournament’s best) as being a somewhat false reflection of the reality. Time shall tell, though it would be a disappointment to lose the likes of Soteldo, Herrera and Fariñez early, when a Final Phase spot had seemed so eminently attainable.

boliviaflag Bolivia

Somewhat remarkably, they now have four points and, if Argentina beat Venezuela, can afford a loss against Uruguay and still progress past Group B. They were second-best in this game and virtually all of their players who had impressed in their opening win against Peru did little of note here. Indeed, any lustre goalkeeper Rubén Cordano (No. 1, Blooming) may have gained following that match has by now well and truly worn off. He was not responsible for stopping any of Venezuela’s glaring misses and had Balza displayed more direction and anticipation, then he would have been culpable for at least the first of these. Furthermore, in the 64th minute following a cynical kick to halt Córdova’s charge just outside of his area, many Venezuelans were angered to see him only receive a yellow card.

The outfield stars from that opening win were little better, though Bruno Miranda (No. 11, Universidad de Chile, Chile) could well have scored twice. Firstly, in the 59th minute, 17-year-old Ramiro Vaca (No. 10, Quebracho) – who could be one-to-watch in the long run, having scored a free-kick against Argentina and having had another decent one parried here – dinked a short diagonal ball over to him on the left inside the area. From here, Miranda gained some space from a defender by getting the ball over to his right yet, though many were anticipating a goal, he instead struck a couple of yards wide of the near post. Things became rather end-to-end at this stage and just a few minutes later, a Bolivian ball was pumped clear and chased by Miranda; he did well to outpace a defender and then loop it over the outcoming Fariñez, though he couldn’t quite knock it in from the other side as a defender just about got the better of a ball that was bouncing perilously in the goalmouth.

Nevertheless, despite this rather poor display which perhaps should have ended with a scoreline similar to the one that Argentina inflicted upon them, Bolivia go into the final day as favourites to nab the third qualifying position.

Uruguay 2-0 Peru

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 25 January 2017 (YouTube)

Though it was by no means a vintage performance, Uruguay did what they needed to in order to spring up to 2nd in Group B, whilst simultaneously eliminating an uninspiring Peru side. With what was his nation’s fourth penalty in three games – and only the second to be successfully converted – Rodrigo Amaral gave them an early lead with his second goal of the tournament. Although Peru did threaten, Uruguay looked likelier to double their lead and did so in the 63rd minute when Nicolás Schiappacasse also notched his second competition goal with a fine left-footed strike from the inside-left of the area. Though shortly afterwards Peru’s Adrián Ugarriza hit the post and Uruguayan substitute Santiago Viera was quickly red-carded, La Celeste‘s youngsters held on for the three crucial points.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

As against Argentina, Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) put his side ahead within the first ten minutes, this time from a confidently-executed penalty. Again, he was to be found running at defenders with Rooney-esque (circa. 2004) fearlessness and put in at least a couple of decent balls that fell into good positions, even if there was no-one there to meet them. He also had a couple of chances to shoot from open play, such as in the 18th minute when he brilliantly turned a player and then struck well from 25 yards, though it went a couple of yards wide. Later, just before half-time, he received a pass on the left inside the area but, owing to his awkward position, could only strike into the side-netting. Similar to the Argentina game, he had a quieter second half and so, whether for fitness or performance reasons, he was substituted off in the 70th minute.

The man who slid in Amaral for his half-time opportunity and who also won the 9th-minute penalty was Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid). His second-half goal, for which he latched onto a left-sided pass from Matías Viña (No. 17, Nacional), was rather well-taken from inside of the area and was the sign of a natural marksman – even if the goalkeeper probably should have got closer to a strike at his near post.

Otherwise, there were a few other moments of note: in the 11th minute, José Rodríguez (No. 4, Danubio) strode forward and played it to the edge of the area to club team-mate Marcelo Saracchi (No. 6, Danubio); with his upper body, he guided it into his own path then flicked an effort with the outside of his left boot which the goalkeeper just about touched over his head and onto the top of the crossbar. Later in the 59th minute, Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) did well to drive into the area on the inside-left before striking low to force a parry for a corner. Lastly, in the 72nd minute shortly after Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) had taken the place as well as the captain’s armband from Amaral, he displayed some nice footwork on the right to beat a few players and have a one-two returned to him; alas, his shot from inside the area was on the stretch and well over.

The 77th-minute straight red card of another substitute, Santiago Viera (No. 21, Liverpool, Uruguay), seven minutes after he had come on, may have made the final quarter-hour a tad tighter but, as his game-time so far has been restricted to two very brief appearances from the bench, Uruguay should be fine without him. Indeed, though they are not yet through to the Hexagonal stage, sitting 2nd in the table and with Bolivia as their final opponents, they should be feeling rather confident.

 peruflag Peru

Alas, the time has come to say goodbye to Peru, who have amassed just two points from four games. Though they were rather unlucky to have succumbed to last-minute equalisers in their games against Argentina and Venezuela, they struggled to really sparkle at any point as an attacking force and have especially paid the price for surprisingly getting turned over by Bolivia.

Here against Uruguay, they did get forward from time to time but were already two goals behind and heading out before they had their best chance, which came in the 69th minute. Just inside the area on the inside-left, striker Adrián Ugarriza (No. 19, Universitario) did rather well to control with his left and make some space from a defender, before quickly firing with his right; unfortunately, his shot hit the near post and went out wide.

Otherwise, perhaps the next best chance Peru had was all the way back in the 4th minute when Miguel Castro (No. 14, Juan Aurich) struck a good, left-footed effort from 30 yards which had to be parried low and then quickly cleared. In the 44th minute, Castro also played in a decent free-kick from the inside-right which looked promising for Fernando Pacheco (No. 16, Sporting Cristal), but his header went comfortably over.

Ultimately, throughout Peru’s tournament, there were always players who showed glimpses of ability that suggested that they could take the bull by the horns in future games and become impossible to ignore. However, this never really materialised. There are undeniably some useful creative players in this Peru team who may well receive regular call-ups to the senior side at some point in their professional careers, but on the evidence of the past eight days, one could not confidently assert which individuals these are likely to be.

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter. The next games will be Colombia vs Chile & Ecuador vs Paraguay, the final games from Group A – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical