Tag Archives: Juan Cuadrado

Colombia 2-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (7 September 2018)

In front of a passionate Miami crowd, well-populated by those with ties to either of the neighbouring countries, Venezuela fell short in their long-awaited return to international action. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides an account of the game as well as some thoughts…

International Friendly

Friday 7 September 2018 – Hard Rock Stadium, Miami Gardens, Florida, USA

Colombia 2-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Colombia 2-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 7 September 2018 (YouTube)

La Vinotinto Return Half-Awake

With only stoppage-time left to play, Yimmi Chará struck to give Colombia a deserved 2-1 comeback win over a Venezuela whose lack of game-time for 298 days became more evident as the encounter wore on.

However, it certainly did not feel that way in the opening exchanges. Straight away, with less than a minute on the clock, an Alexander González diagonal ball offered a surprise one-on-one for Salomón Rondón against David Ospina. Unfortunately for the Newcastle summer signing, his touch was heavy and he could only awkwardly bundle the ball a fraction past the Napoli-loanee before the defence was on hand to clear up. Undeterred, before the clock reached the fourth minute, a González cross from the right caught the Colombian back line by surprise and, with his first-ever goal for the senior side, the alert Darwin Machís headed low into the opposite corner to give La Vinotinto a 1-0 lead.

There was a healthy number of compatriots in the stands of the home of the Miami Dolphins to cheer this dream collective return to the international fold and these two men would prove to be two of Venezuela’s more noteworthy contributors. The Elche right-back occasionally being a threat knocking balls into the area and the Udinese attacker – playing here on the left of midfield – rarely afraid to cut inside, drive past opponents and strike at Ospina’s goal.

Also early on, Venezuela’s most-capped active player, captain Tomás Rincón, asserted himself in midfield and, when the opportunity presented itself, sought to find the second-most-experienced player, Rondón. Overall, the Torino man had the kind of night that has earned him his ball-winning, battling reputation, whereas the Magpie, as at club level, lacked sharpness, often finding himself burdened with the donkey work of chasing scraps and attempting to fashion something from almost nothing. The link-up play with man-of-the-moment Josef Martínez was virtually non-existent, as the Atlanta United goal-machine saw even less of the ball. It has since been claimed that he was carrying a knock and that it had been agreed in advance that he would subsequently stay in the USA and thus not make the trip to Panama on Tuesday.

Further back in the Vinotinto ranks, another eye-catching performance was put in by 20-year-old goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez; for some, his side’s man of the match. However, his increasing involvement from around the quarter-hour mark onwards was to be rarely overturned for any substantial period of time, as Colombia’s World Cup-level fluidity and ability became more prominent.

Indeed, Los Cafeteros – in their first game since the departure of José Pékerman – enjoyed more midfield possession and were quick to target the Venezuelan left-flank, where Rolf Feltscher often found himself exposed and received little support from Machís. Atlético Madrid right-back Santiago Arias regularly profited, first really making his presence felt in the 15th minute when he whipped in a cross that Mateus Uribe did well to volley; Faríñez parried this low, preventing it from creeping into the far corner.

Three minutes later, River Plate-loanee Juan Fernando Quintero, announced himself on the Hard Rock turf. He would go on to be Colombia’s standout player, giving Venezuela’s rearguard a torrid time with his dribbles, crafty through-balls and all-round inventiveness. His first moment of magic saw him drop the shoulder with great ease to both Machís and Feltscher, putting himself in a great position inside the area, before miscuing his shot.

Quintero and his colleagues ensured that Venezuela regularly ceded the midfield ball-play, finding themselves on the backfoot, deeply retreated with often two defensive lines crowding the area, anxiously repelling balls from all directions. Thus, the scares arrived with greater frequency: Carlos Bacca sped past centre-back Jhon Chancellor but González marginally out-paced an opponent to clear the goalmouth cut-back; Quintero dummied a pass, leaving Arias in acres of space on the right to play a first-time pass to Juan Cuadrado in the area, whose shot was well-blocked by Chancellor’s partner Wilker Ángel; a minute later from a deep position, Quintero and Radamel Falcao were one step ahead of their opponents, as the former’s incisive pass to the latter left Júnior Moreno playing catch-up, although the Monaco striker’s effort from an acute position went into the side-netting.

Venezuela did make some further first-half in-roads into the Colombian half but struggled to have any command over the ball; instead, Quintero continued running the show. In the 33rd minute, from a centre-right position, he curled a left-footed ball that Cuadrado was more alert to than González, but the Juventus attacker was ultimately denied by the ever-attentive Faríñez, who knocked it out for a corner. Almost ten minutes later, the Millonarios goalkeeper was again very much awake, this time to a deceptive, curling free-kick by Quintero from near the right touchline; it was curling towards the back of the net, before being punched over the bar.

However, before the half-time whistle went, Venezuela gave their opponents a reminder of the sudden, unanticipated threat that lurked. Some rather improvised passing inside the final third between Rincón, Rondón and Machís ended with the captain turning in his tracks to play a pass to the edge of the area to the goalscorer. He, in turn, struck first-time with his right, curling barely a yard wide of Ospina’s far post.

For a fleeting moment, the 1-0 lead of Rafael Dudamel’s men did not feel quite so precarious, though they were to struggle to build upon this in the second half.

The pattern of play of the opening five minutes after the restart was very familiar, with last-ditch blocks and interceptions required to quell the Colombian threat. That is, until the 51st minute when a goal seemed on the cards, as an exquisite touch by Quintero generated a one-on-one opportunity for Falcao. However, his shot from little more than ten yards lacked direction as Faríñez stayed strong to dramatically block. Not to be outdone, Colombia’s all-time top-scorer would soon make up for this lack of composure.

Indeed, shortly after Machís cut over from the left to feed Sergio Córdova for a long-range effort that was easy work for Ospina, Colombia returned to their hunting ground and found a 55th-minute equaliser. Here, the Colombian strike-force were able to demonstrate high-level intuitive, cut-throat abilities against a Russia-based centre-back pairing. Upon making a run to receive a pass from Quintero, Villarreal’s Bacca – who played club football in Venezuela a decade ago – only needed two touches to gain space from Ángel and then poke the ball to the central Falcao, who also took two touches: first to open up the opportunity away from Chancellor and the second, killer, one to strike the ball home into the bottom corner.

The goal was undoubtedly deserved and nine minutes later, they could have taken the lead were it not for Faríñez. This time, Quintero’s attempt to cut open the defence was only partially thwarted, with the ball falling very invitingly for the central Uribe, whose side-footed effort would have crept into the far corner were it not for the low glove of the ex-Caracas FC stopper.

Although after the goal Colombia continued to give the opposition defence the jitters, Dudamel’s men were able to offer some glimpses of offensive threat. On the hour-mark, Machís was on hand to intercept a pass and play through Martínez, who suddenly had a one-on-one which was struck at Ospina – albeit after the play had been called back for a debatable offside.

Just before this moment, the rather ineffective Córdova was replaced on the right side of midfield by the more dynamic Luis “Cariaco” González, who appeared to relish playing against the country in which he now earns his living. Indeed, in his half-hour cameo, the Tolima winger gained space for himself and played in several balls that caused concern for Ospina and his centre-backs. Rondón managed to meet one of these in the 68th-minute but, perhaps owing to the defender on his back, was unable to make a telling connection. With a bit of work in training, this could potentially become a useful creative outlet for Dudamel. Elsewhere in the Venezuelan ranks, Rincón showed once again that his particular understanding with the ex-West Brom striker still holds some currency. Indeed, six minutes later, his lofted ball into the area was chested by the centre-forward, before the strike was blocked by Davinson Sánchez for a corner.

All that being said, the most positive attacking performance for Venezuela undoubtedly came from Serie A new-boy Machís. Out of nothing from 25 yards out in the 79th minute, he further underlined this by taking a stepover and firing a feisty left-footed strike that demanded a spectacular one-handed tip-over from Ospina.

Nevertheless, ultimately it was to be Colombia’s day and in the final ten minutes, with both teams semi-transformed due to the number of substitutes, they re-asserted their superiority. In the 83rd minute, they should really have had the winner, but Glasgow Rangers’ international debutant Alfredo Morelos was unable to adjust his footing; with the vacant goal gaping following a goalmouth pass from impressive fellow substitute Sebastián Villa, he instead knocked the ball into the hands of the grateful Faríñez. Despite this gaffe, one way or another, Morelos had a very memorable quarter-of-an-hour. Just two minutes later he received a pass from Luis Muriel on the edge of area, swivelling rapidly to strike low and only marginally missing the near post. Then, in the final minute of regulation time, though he knew little about it, he was involved in the winning goal.

Here, Villa played a one-two with Muriel on the right inside the area and dinked a ball past the – possibly misjudged – onrushing Faríñez, which defenders attempted to knock away but could only clear as far as Atlético Mineiro’s Yimmi Chará. Comically, his first attempt was blocked by the horizontal Morelos – who had instinctively decided to duck-and-cover on the goal-line – but he made sure from the rebound, giving interim manager Arturo Reyes the result that his side’s play had merited.

Overall then, in so many ways, Venezuela’s rusty performance should have come as little surprise, playing as they did in a similar manner to how they ended the qualifers, albeit with somewhat less verve and success. A few players, most notably Machís, offered optimism for the long-term future but the team lacked match sharpness and were often unable to keep up with a more advanced footballing nation. They were unable to hold onto the ball in the centre of the pitch, with attacking avenues largely coming from crosses and – mostly thwarted – rapid transitions, rather than patient build-up play. This absence of possession and the concomitant cautious camping meant that they often packed the centre of their considerable rearguard with bodies, seemingly in an implicit acknowledgement that the flanks were going to leak problems that necessitated reinforcements. As Dudamel said pre-game, the left-side in particular is a “headache” and thus it proved, both with Feltscher on the pitch as well as with his 62nd-minute replacement, debutant Luis Mago. With the Carabobo FC man scheduled to start against Panama on Tuesday, many Vinotinto fans will be hoping that he can provide a surprising solution and develop a better relationship with those around him.

Dudamel has indicated that several other hitherto unused players will see action in Panama City, in what is likely to be a considerable challenge against a side that Venezuela have not managed to beat in their last seven attempts – even if the last two games were draws.

Although we are unlikely to witness any dramatic changes in playing style, this may turn out to be a more inviting test and with the new cycle having only just begun, for everyone involved, there really is everything to play for.

Team Selections

Colombia (4-3-1-2): D. Ospina; S. Arias (H. Palacios, 90+2′), D. Sánchez, W. Tesillo, C. Borja; J. Cuadrado (Y. Chará, 75′), W. Barrios (J. Campuzano, 81′), M. Uribe; J. Quintero (S. Villa, 75′); C. Bacca (L. Muriel, 68′) & R. Falcao (A. Morelos, 77′).

Venezuela (4-4-2): W. Fariñez; A. González, J. Chancellor (Y. Osorio, 87′), W. Ángel, R. Feltscher (L. Mago, 62′); S. Córdova (L. González, 59′), T. Rincón (J. Savarino, 81′), J. Moreno, D. Machís (R. Otero, 81′); S. Rondón & J. Martínez (R. Lucena, 68′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Colombia 0-1 Venezuela – 2015 Copa América Group C (14 June 2015)

2015 Copa América Group C

Sunday 14 June 2015 – Estadio El Teniente, Rancagua, Chile

Colombia 0-1 Venezuela 

Highlights of Colombia 0-1 Venezuela, 2015 Copa América Group C, 14 June 2015, (Video courtesy of YouTube user Lukas Buretzek).

Team Selections

Colombia (4-2-2-2): Ospina; Zúñiga, Zapata, Murillo, Armero (Martínez, 82′); Sánchez (Cardona, 63′), Valencia; Cuadrado, Rodríguez; Falcao, Bacca (Gutiérrez, 72′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): Baroja; Rosales, Vizcarrondo, Túñez, Amorebieta; Rincón, Seijas (Lucena, 74′); R. Vargas (C. González, 78′), Arango (Cichero, 85′), Guerra; S. Rondón.

Rondón Rocks Colombia to Give Resilient Venezuela Remarkable Opening Day Win 

Match Report

With his first goal for his country since September 2013, Salomón Rondón headed La Vinotinto to a euphoric opening day victory, immediately allowing Venezuelan hopes escalate from the modest to the stratospheric in the space of ninety minutes. 

Click Here to Listen to Venezuelan Commentary of Salomón Rondón’s Match-winning Goal

Given the noted difficulties manager Noel Sanvicente has had to contend with since taking over in July 2014 as well as Los Cafeteros’ recent form and much-acclaimed history-making performances at the last World Cup, Venezuela were justifiably made rank 7/1 outsiders for this game by most bookmakers. Indeed, irrespective of Venezuela’s remarkable run four years ago, as they have conceded 18 goals (19 officially) in Sanvicente’s eight preceding games in charge while only netting 12 (10 officially) – with none of the scorers starting this game – make no mistake, this was a turn-up.

Before their representatives kicked off Group C, both sets of fans overran the city of Rancagua, some 54 miles south of Santiago, adorning the streets outside Estadio El Teniente with the yellow, blue and red common to both nations’ flags. However, once the anthems had been proudly belted out, it was apparent that the majority of the 14,000-capacity ground were backing the favourites of this pair of northerly neighbours. Played amidst a picturesque backdrop of snow-capped peaks at the home of Chilean top-flight side O’Higgins – named after the independence leader of Irish-Spanish heritage – there was to be little let-up in the frenetic atmosphere, with the sunny clear blue sky somewhat belying the fact that it was reportedly 12-13 degrees celsius on this winter day.

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Colombian and Venezuelan fans in and outside Rancagua’s Estadio El Teniente (Three images courtesy of @munirancagua; the third one – of famous Colombian supporter El Cole – comes via  @)

Indeed, despite the actual temperature, within this first ten minutes of this encounter, sweat was seen dripping off the foreheads of many of the players, particularly those in the burgundy shirts. Venezuela, very much applying one of Sanvicente’s favourite words, ‘trabajo‘ (work), were labouring away, sitting deep while regularly doubling up on attackers, allowing them little space in the final third. The only moment of minor concern in the early stages came when James Rodríguez received a short pass centrally but he had little time or space to squeeze a shot through and his effort deflected harmlessly wide.

Instead, the first real opening was to fall to La Vinotinto as Cristián Zapata’s lazy pass was cut out, allowing Rondón to suddenly stride forward. He laid it to his left to the overlapping Alejandro Guerra who, inside the area, could not quite guide his dinked ball, but at least won a corner. Six minutes later, AEK’s new signing Ronald Vargas beat his man on the right, sliding in a low ball that Guerra lunged for but could not quite reach, with instead goalkeeper David Ospina collecting. Such moments offered optimism that Sanvicente was not looking solely to contain, with instead his side gradually asserting themselves, both on and off the ball. Indeed, interspersed with some rather robust challenges, two Venezuelans were to go in the book, firstly Luis Manuel Seijas on 18 minutes and then left-back Fernando Amorebieta seven minutes later. With the former playing a key role next to Tomás Rincón providing additional cover to the back four and the latter – who had been regularly exposed in this role at club level all season – having to contend with the fleet-footed Juan Cuadrado, there were genuine fears that Venezuela would not finish with as many that they started with.

It was soon after Amorebieta’s booking that ex-Mexican President Felipe Calderón (2006-12) piped up on Twitter to condemn Venezuela’s alleged rough play, attempting to score some political points by suggesting they must have been trained by the nation’s polarising President, Nicolás Maduro. His comments were widely shared on social media, as were those in response.

Back to the pitch, though politics are never far away when Venezuela play, just two minutes later they were to continue their occasional forward forays, generating what turned out to be the clearest chance of the half. Rincón, momentarily on the left, nudged the ball to Guerra on the flank who came inside to pass to Juan Arango on the edge of the area. With instinctive awareness, the iconic veteran held up the ball before releasing Vargas to the left of the goal with an exquisite reverse pass that the winger, under a bit of pressure, poked with his outside-right to draw a decent one-handed save from the Arsenal goalkeeper. To an extent, this move typified the attacking midfield three throughout the game, combining the industrious Guerra, with the casual elegance of Arango and the energy of Vargas, who often drifted infield from his right-sided starting spot.

For the rest of the half, while the Colombians saw more of the ball, they struggled to find a way through the opposition’s well-organised and close-knitted defensive lines. When, for example, Guerra carelessly got dispossessed in the middle third, while Sevilla hotshot Carlos Bacca temporarily had some space in which to charge, he was quick to get closed down by several players, thus deflating the majority of the crowd. Furthermore, the many free-kicks and corners that José Pékerman’s men won were routinely headed away by the likes of centre-backs Oswaldo Vizcarrondo and Andrés Túñez, as well as even Rondón on occasion. Conversely, Venezuela, though often on the back foot, comfortably had the best chances before the interval, adding another on 42 minutes. This time, from the right, Rincón passed a short diagonal ball that Vargas dummied just inside the area, leading Guerra to tee himself up for an acrobatic vollley. While it may have been lurching slightly wide, Ospina nevertheless made the parry for a corner.

When the Uruguayan official whistled for the break, much Venezuelan apprehension regarding their nation’s chances in this tournament had already dissipated. The team was displaying admirable commitment, defensive solidity and, dare one utter it, a slightly greater probability of opening the scoring. Given the fitness levels required to track their opponents so assiduously the main question on the mind of many was, could they keep it up?

The opening exchanges of the second half were not entirely encouraging in this regard. Indeed, while to call it dominance would be a stretch, the Colombians nevertheless largely had the ball in the opposition territory for the first ten minutes. However, again, confronted with a largely packed final third, the best they could muster from their crosses and corners was, from a loose ball, an instinctive shot from Aston Villa’s Carlos Sánchez on the edge of the area that pinged a few yards over.

After this pressure subsided, the tide gradually turned. Capitalising again on some hesitant Colombian defensive play, Rondón nabbed the ball and played it out on the left to Guerra. These two were to combine well several times in the game and here, the Zenit St. Petersburg striker ran into the area and met his colleague’s cross, looping a header onto the crossbar. However, before it made contact with the woodwork, the referee blew to penalise the striker for a foul of dubious justification. Nevertheless, not long after Vizcarrondo’s penalty area stretch denied Valencia (who was, in any case, offside) a chance from a dangerous Falcao knock-down following a Rodríguez cross, Rondón would not be denied a second time.

Just before the hour-mark on the right, the tenacious Málaga right-back Roberto Rosales quickly took a throw that Arango, with majestic nonchalance, hooked into the area where it bounced before the left-sided Guerra who, sensing an opportunity, sprung a diving header towards Rondón. Demonstrating admirable neck muscles, he instinctively contorted back to power the ball towards the far corner, where it bounced in what felt like slow motion, before crossing the line. Puncturing the atmosphere in the majority of the ground, some fans at home must have had a delayed response to this, with the distant Venezuelan cheers granting the green light for euphoria. Soon after reeling away, the achievement and the occasion suddenly overwhelmed the man they call Salo, as he stopped in his tracks and fell to the ground. Having netted his first international goal for 21 months and put himself back on course to one day be his country’s all-time top goalscorer, elated team-mates were quick to bundle him.

In the aftermath, while Colombia certainly already knew that they had a task on their hands, as with the preceding sixty minutes, they were to struggle to find any way to surmount it, continuing to put in crosses and attempt direct attacks that were blocked. The arrival of River Plate’s pacy livewire, Teófilo Gutiérrez, in place of the ineffectual Bacca on 72 minutes, appeared to be an acknowledgement by Pékerman that his side could do with some speed and it almost had an immediate impact. Indeed, Rodríguez picked up a loose ball in a central area and played a smart pass to Gutiérrez, yet while he appeared to have a sight on goal, by the time that he adjusted himself for the shot, centre-back Túñez came over to act as an effective shield.

A minute afterwards, the first of three defence-minded Venezuelan changes occurred, all of which involved experienced players who had been regulars at the history-making 2011 tournament. 34-year-old Franklin Lucena replaced Seijas to renew his erstwhile first-choice partnership with Rincón, though before he could do so he contrived to get himself booked before even crossing the touchline, having knocked the ball away from an opponent looking to take a throw. Four minutes later, Vargas was taken off for the more reserved, yet nevertheless creative, right-sided midfielder César González, 32. Lastly, with five minutes remaining, left-back Gabriel Cichero, 31, who had played in all but one of Sanvicente’s warm-up games, came on for Arango, with the back four becoming what appeared to be a back five.

Despite these moves, Venezuela were still managing to get forward during and after this period, with Arango gracefully turning and spraying balls out wide and Rondón chasing and hustling defenders, often giving his own rearguard some respite with his hold-up play.

Nevertheless, Colombia still needed a goal and their collective frustration appeared evident in an effort from Rodríguez with little more than ten minutes remaining. With his side having barely had a chance inside the area, the Real Madrid man opted to lash a left-footed strike from around 20 yards that goalkeeper Alain Baroja did well to parry out strongly before also quickly getting up to put a hand to substitute Edwin Cardona’s rebound. Following this, much praise was lavished upon the Caracas FC goalkeeper which, given he would have likely been criticised had he conceded, perhaps is testimony to both how little trouble he had hitherto faced as well as the significance of the occasion for him and his country. Indeed, playing in his first ever competitive international since making his debut against Honduras in February, he has had a remarkable domestic season and his prominence in this tournament is likely to facilitate a move abroad in the near future.

Subsequently, from a corner that came after the previous one was knocked back out, Colombia arguably had a better chance to score. This time, Rodríguez headed on the cross towards Zapata who was in space at the back post, but the AC Milan defender could not quite wrap his leg around it and the ball instead bobbled out.

From a Colombian perspective, the remainder of the game proceeded with no discernible difference. They continued to be thwarted by the little room they were afforded, winning the occasional, ultimately unsuccessful set-piece and having a half-chance, this time when Cardona’s nice work on the right led to a cross for fellow substitute Jackson Martínez to head down, albeit slightly behind Cuadrado, who directed his close-range effort well wide.

Such meagre sightings of Baroja’s goal were to subsequently decrease in number and, upon the goalkeeper’s clearance upfield after five-and-a-half minutes of stoppage-time, the final whistle blew. It was all over. Despite all the pre-tournament doubts about the team’s seeming lack of preparation and the international form of its leading players, Venezuela had accomplished something truly historic that will have sent confidence levels skyrocketing. Remarkably, this was the first ever win for the nation in their opening Copa América game and now they can genuinely dream of reaching the knock-out stages to once again defy some more expectations. It was to prove all too much for goal-hero Rondón to take in, with his response to the final whistle no doubt summing up most of his compatriots’ feelings.

Despite the well-documented problems that exist in the country – some of which were visibly displayed by fans in Rancagua – jubilation was allowed to temporarily reign in the homes, bars and public spaces across Venezuela. Although the country may be renowned for traditionally being more partial to baseball, huge numbers will tune in to watch La Vinotinto. So many in fact that President Maduro and some of his inner circle have utilised the team as a symbol of national unity by often being seen in public wearing the same striking yellow, blue and red tracksuit that is more commonly sighted on Sanvicente and his staff. This follows on from the late Hugo Chávez’s enthusiastic social media support of the team in 2011 which, endearingly or otherwise depending on your political persuasion, fans on Twitter mined during the Colombia game. Indeed, many of his four-year-old tweets were retweeted at choice moments on sunday, including this one that originally appeared towards the end of the epic 3-3 group stage draw with Paraguay:

Looking ahead, if the nation and the team manage to come back down to earth, they will need to be prepared for what could well be an altogether different challenge and set of tactics on Thursday in the form of Peru. In the meantime, keep an eye out on this site for an article that looks back at this game, expanding on some points raised above, as well as taking into consideration the different task that is anticipated to be posed by Los Incas.

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Left: Fans watching the game in a public area in Caracas (Source: @UNoticias).              Right: Jubilant Venezuelan fans outside the ground in Rancagua, celebrating inside a goal-cum-bus-stop (Source: @munirancagua). 

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical