Tag Archives: La Verde

Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia & Peru – Top Talents at the 2017 Under-20 South American Youth Championship

The 2017 Under-20 South American Youth Championship took place in Ecuador from 18 January until 11 February. @DarrenSpherical watched all 35 games, writing reports for each encounter that detailed all the significant moments by the most talented players that were spotted. This article focuses on the most notable starlets found in the ranks of Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia & Peru, who were all knocked out in the opening group stage and thus will not be going to the Under-20 World Cup. Before browsing below, it may be advisable to have a look at the final standings, results and goalscorers here and/or read the main reference guide published on this website, which features details on dozens of players, with every one of the ten participating nations represented. 

(All photographs are credited to GettyImages)

Best of the Early Departees

Although their individual presences now feel like a lifetime ago, what follows are some details on the most talented players from the four sides who were knocked out in the opening group stage of the 2017 Under-20 South American Youth Championship. Whilst one firmly believes that the six best teams qualified for the Hexagonal, there are nevertheless a dozen or so players from nations that went home early who may still be worth keeping in mind.

Group A

paraguay Paraguay

Tournament Summary

Certainly the side featuring the best players who did not make it to the Hexagonal stage, they were ultimately one goal away from finishing exactly level with Ecuador and requiring lots to be drawn.

To view highlights as well as read more about how Paraguay got on and who stood out in each game, click here.

Talents

Having featured in 2015 as a 17-year-old, left-footed attacking midfielder Jesús Medina (No. 11, Libertad) was playing in his second Sudamericano Sub-20 tournament and he further bolstered his reputation in his four games in January. Indeed, a regular at a high domestic level, he was often seen taking set-pieces and looking to play in team-mates; most notably, he managed score twice late on against Brazil. He also received an assist against Chile for a forward pass to Pedro Báez (No. 9, Cerro Porteño), but it’s the striker who deserves most credit for fooling a cluster of defenders before firing home. Furthermore with regard to Báez, he would go on to score an audacious lob at the very beginning of the second half of the decisive final clash against Ecuador – as he only received two starts and a substitute appearance, two goals was a respectable haul.

Otherwise, the two full-backs are prospects whose names are worth remembering by fans of La Albirroja. Both played in all four games and were particularly notable for their attacking, with right-back Rodi Ferreira (No. 2, Olimpia) frequently seen pumping testing balls upfield as well as knocking in dangerous free-kicks. At just 18 years of age, he looks to be well on the right path, possessing an impressive youth career which includes featuring at 2015’s U-17 World Cup. He is also a regular starter at domestic giants Olimpia and can count a former team-mate of his in left-back Blás Riveros (No. 4, Basel, Switzerland), who has in the past several months already made four starts in the Swiss Super League. In this tournament, like Ferreira, he regularly played diagonal balls upfield and, with one against Colombia, was actually credited with an assist. At times, he also displayed an impressive capacity to beat opponents and get forward, most eye-catchingly so against Ecuador, when he nearly scored after blazing a trail through the centre of the pitch, finally striking narrowly wide.

chileflag Chile

Tournament Summary

Less can be said for La Rojita, particularly from an attacking perspective, as even though they were still fighting for a Hexagonal place on the final Group A matchday, they did only manage to pick up two points, scoring just two goals.

To view highlights as well as read more about how Chile got on and who stood out in each game, click here.

Talents

Coming into the tournament, Jeisson Vargas (No. 10, Estudiantes de La Plata, Argentina, on loan from Bologna, Italy) had some admirers, yet was recklessly sent off in the opening half of the first match against Brazil. He had looked like a potential threat and when he returned in the third game against Paraguay, he clearly wished to make it up to his team-mates; here, he struck numerous attempts from range and tested defenders and the goalkeeper alike with set-pieces, one of which rattled the crossbar. To a lesser extent, he was also one of the leading forward players in the crunch game with Colombia. In this match, Ignacio Jara (No. 15, Cobreloa) missed a glaring opportunity to equalise, though as he did also score against Paraguay and gained an assist in the preceding encounter with Ecuador, he perhaps shouldn’t be completely dismissed.

As their record of four goals conceded was the second best in the group, their defence – which kept a clean sheet against Brazil whilst playing with ten men for an hour – received some favourable comments. Arguably the cream of the crop was centre-back Francisco Sierralta (No. 13, Palestino, on loan from Granada, Spain), 6 feet 3 and captain of the side. He particularly showed his leadership qualities in the final match with Colombia when, somewhat curiously given his position, he regularly forced his way forward and even struck the crossbar with 15 minutes remaining. Like Paraguay’s Riveros in the last-day match with Ecuador, Sierralta picked up a second yellow card towards the end of the final encounter with Colombia, though both of these fouls can be put down to an overspill of passion and drive as these men played prominent roles in their respective countries’ struggles.

Group B

boliviaflag Bolivia

Tournament Summary

Coming into the tournament in organisational disarray, lower-than-usual expectations were defied when they beat Peru 2-0. However, a 5-1 thrashing by Argentina seemed to restore balance in the universe of footballing certainties, yet after fortunately gaining a point off Venezuela, they were in a promising position to progress, but alas it wasn’t to be.

To view highlights as well as read more about how Bolivia got on and who stood out in each game, click here

Talents

Following the 2-0 win over Peru, it looked as if they may have a handful of players worth keeping an eye on but none of these could be said to have made any valuable contributions afterwards. Indeed, man-of-the-match Limberg Gutiérrez (No. 20, Nacional, Uruguay) – who also played in the 2015 tournament and is the son of a highly-capped international – was virtually anonymous in subsequent games, despite having displayed some skill and drive, particularly when setting up the second goal against Peru. This was scored by Bruno Miranda (No. 11, Universidad de Chile, Chile), who had another shot of note in the game; subsequently, he had two more opportunities against Venezuela and perhaps should have done better with at least one of these.

Instead, however, quite possibly the one to look out for from this crop was the youngest member of the squad, the man who came on as a substitute in the Peru win and would later earn two starts from his three subsequent appearances. Indeed, 17-year-old Ramiro Vaca (No. 10, Quebracho) emerged off the bench for a second time against Argentina and scored a brilliant free-kick; this is clearly a specialty of his as he also struck a fine 35-yard set-piece against Uruguay that required a parry in Bolivia’s final match. Had Miranda buried the first of his chances against Venezuela, he would have also had an admirable assist to his name.

peruflag Peru

Tournament Summary

Finishing with just two points and embarrassed by Bolivia in their second game, an unremarkable Peru were nevertheless somewhat unlucky not to progress to the Hexagonal, having been denied wins against both Argentina and Venezuela due to last-minute equalisers.

To view highlights as well as read more about how Peru got on and who stood out in each game, click here

Talents

They did well defensively to largely frustrate Argentina though it can’t really be said that any defenders were able to build upon this in subsequent games. Instead, it’s perhaps towards the attackers that one must look to if anyone is to be highlighted, though even here there aren’t really any clear candidates. Perhaps midfielder Roberto Siucho (No. 11, Universitario) – who also played in 2015’s competition – deserves a mention, largely for scoring his side’s two tournament goals, despite only ever once finding the net at club level in over 50 games (in all competitions). The first against Argentina was a strike from outside the area that would never have gone in were it not for a wicked deflection and the second against Venezuela involved a defensive mix-up, though he nevertheless did well to barge in and slide home.

Otherwise, there is a striker and at least a few attacking midfielders who showed glimpses of ability, though to name all of them would be somewhat disproportionate to their contributions. Thus, just a quick mention for 17-year-old Gerald Távara (No. 7, Sporting Cristal), who, particularly against Venezuela, stood out with his crosses and shots, such as the 4th-minute attempt at a gol olímpico (from a direct corner), which had to be palmed back out. Having featured at the Under-17 Sudamericano tournament in 2015, he appears to be playing two years in advance of his age; perhaps he can get some good club experience under his belt before his potential return at Chile 2019.


If you would like to read about the best talents from the other nations, then click on the following links: UruguayEcuador, Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil & Colombia. All of this information is also contained in this mammoth Reference Guide.  

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s CONMEBOL Qualifying Campaign for FIFA World Cup 2018 – November 2015 Preview

With Venezuela having lost their opening two World Cup Qualifying fixtures, Hispanospherical.com looks at the situation facing manager Noel Sanvicente, his team’s preparations for their visit to high-altitude La Paz to face Bolivia as well as the notable call-ups for this game and the subsequent home encounter with Ecuador.

CONMEBOL Qualifiers for FIFA World Cup 2018

Thursday 12 November 2015 – Estadio Hernando Siles, La Paz, La Paz Department

Bolivia vs Venezuela

Tuesday 17 November 2015 – Estadio Cachamay, Puerto Ordaz, Ciudad Guayana, Bolívar State

Venezuela vs Ecuador
Sanvicente Urgently Needs to Give Fans Something to Cheer About

Estadio Hernando Siles, La Paz, La Paz Department, Bolivia, where Venezuela play on 12 November 2015. (Photo courtesy of David Freeman who travelled to 67 football matches across Latin America. Read more about his adventures here

‘I am not a coward, I won’t resign’. So proclaimed Venezuela boss Noel Sanvicente last month at a lengthy press conference shortly after his nation’s Russia 2018 qualifying campaign had been inaugurated with two straight defeats. The 3-1 loss away to Brazil may have been largely anticipated, but the embarrassing late defensive mix-up that caused a 1-0 reversal in the opener in Puerto Ordaz at home to Paraguay certainly irked fans, greatly lowering morale at the first hurdle. Coming off the back of poor friendly performances and the failure to reach the knock-out stages of Copa América 2015, many fans ran out of patience with Chita.

The ex-Caracas and Zamora director técnico has lost considerable goodwill in his 16 months in charge. Results have not met expectations, displays have been lacklustre and most players have struggled to replicate their club form. Regarding this last point, given the tactical incoherence repeatedly exhibited as well as the high number of attackers fielded with similarly incohesive results, many point the finger of blame at Sanvicente as his intentions continue to puzzle and bewilder.

In further comments to the media, while he acknowledged some of the criticism and accepted responsibility, he seemed unwilling to consider a fundamental shift in his approach. Instead, amongst other things, he lamented the ‘accident’ involving Oswaldo Vizcarrondo and Alain Baroja that gifted the win to La Albirroja and also remarked upon the superior club levels that many of his country’s opponents play at – an observation that ‘you don’t have to be Harry Potter to see’.

Before Sanvicente categorically stated that the thought of ‘resigning doesn’t go through my head’, he also reiterated that ‘my thing is work, work and more work’. Weary words for many Vinotinto fans as ‘all work and no play’ would certainly be a succinctly apt assessment of his goal-shy reign to date.

Under pressure, currently point-less and in charge of the lowest ranked nation in CONMEBOL (83rd), Sanvicente knows that all this much-vaunted labour must be converted into positive results as soon as possible. This month’s challenges from fellow strugglers Bolivia as well as injury-hit high-flyers Ecuador, while certainly substantial and seemingly with the potential to send Chita scurrying out of a job, do also offer opportunities to reinvigorate the cause. However, though he has claimed his methods will not be changing any time soon, the personnel definitely will be – more so than at any other point since he took up the post.

Venezuelan Preparations: Bumper-sized Squad to Help Cope With High Altitude  

Indeed, Thursday’s trip to La Paz’s Estadio Hernando Siles – over 3,600 metres (nearly 12,000 feet) above sea-level – serves up all kinds of logistical issues that South American nations have attempted to counteract in differing ways. Sanvicente has opted to call up an enlarged squad of 33 players, with 20 of them making the journey to Bolivia; these comprise of an equal mixture of ten home-based individuals and ten, largely more established, legionarios who ply their trade abroad. Several of the latter possess experience of playing at high altitude at club and/or international level but it is those currently featuring in the transitory Torneo Adecuación who have undergone the greatest preparation ahead of this game.

For the past three weeks or so, they have been training at La Vinotinto‘s National Centre of High Performance (CNAR) facility on the northerly Isla de Margarita. Ideally, physical trainer Rodolfo Paladini said he would have liked 17 consecutive days with the players but due to club commitments for some – though not all – this was somewhat problematic. Nevertheless, when available, this domestic crop have been spending time in hyperbaric chambers which are intended to help users experience and acclimatise to simulated high-altitude conditions.

In the few days preceding the game, the overseas-based contingent have gradually been joining up with them at CNAR and today, Wednesday 11th, the 20-strong group flew to Bolivia. However, rather than travel straight to La Paz, they are instead staying in the relatively low-altitude Santa Cruz de la Sierra (416 metres above sea-level). Tomorrow on matchday, they will embark on a get-in-and-get-out strategy as they shall enter the city of the fixture no more than two hours before kick-off; some Bolivia-based portable chambers have been hired to assist any breathing problems they may experience. Almost as soon as the game is concluded, the squad will then take an aeroplane back to the national training centre.

A calculated risk, no doubt, though far from the first time something like this has been deployed by a South American nation. The altitude issue has been a bone of contention for decades and FIFA resolutions have been passed more than once (notably in 1995 and 2007) to ban international games in La Paz, though these were subsequently repealed. It is undeniable that even if not all of Bolivia’s players are accustomed to high-altitude conditions, they have more than enough who are and this has been a partial factor in many victories over some of the continent’s heavyweights. Anyone resistant to this argument may wish to briefly peruse the nation’s woeful record away from home – their Copa América win against Ecuador in June was their first competitive victory on foreign soil since 1995.

Nevertheless, though their home advantage has attained near-mythical status over the years and casual observers may consider a visit from CONMEBOL’s lowest-ranking team as a banker win for La Verde, this is far from assured. Indeed, in the past two visits during World Cup Qualifying campaigns Venezuela have attained a 1-1 draw (in 2013, when Juan Arango’s last international goal was cancelled out with four minutes left) and a 1-0 win (in 2009 via an own goal; this was during the same qualification cycle in which Bolivia beat Argentina 6-1 and Brazil 2-1).

If, however, they are unable to get a result, the pressure will be on to get one against Ecuador – no mean feat as La Tricolor are riding high following two consecutive wins, the first of which being a sensational 2-0 away triumph against under-fire Tata Martino’s Argentina. Though they will be missing key-man Antonio Valencia, they have strength in depth and will fancy their chances as last month’s heroics came without Enner Valencia, Michael Arroyo or Renato Ibarra on the pitch (and who are all injured this time around). The likes of Jefferson Montero and Felipe Caicedo promise to offer the Venezuelan backline a consistent threat throughout the game.

Again though, La Vinotinto have a strong recent qualifying record in this particular fixture, drawing the last encounter 1-1 and winning the preceding two 3-1. Post-La Paz, after the full Venezuela squad reconvenes at CNAR, they will head over to Puerto Ordaz for this game looking to give the Estadio Cachamay public something to cheer about. Indeed, not only did the 1-0 debacle against Paraguay occur at this ground but in September it was also the site of two dreadful displays: a 3-0 reversal meted out by Honduras which was followed by a 1-1 draw with Panama on a bog of a pitch. An on-field apology of sorts is very much in order.

Predicting who will line-up for this second fixture is only marginally more problematic than that of the Bolivia game. Nevertheless, what follows is a brief overview of some players to look out for in the upcoming week, starting with the La Paz trip.

venezuelabolivia

20-man Venezuela squad for the trip to face Bolivia in La Paz (photo: @SeleVinotinto)

Players to Keep an Eye Out For

‘The following are the matches of our lives. We have to go out with impetus. [We] can not give away more points.’ Experienced Franklin Lucena understands the significance of these two games and will more than likely start in La Paz, either as a central defender or a holding midfielder. This is owing to his club outings this season at Colombia’s Once Caldas who play home matches at over 2,000 metres above sea-level and who are accustomed to similar levels of altitude in certain away matches. For similar reasons, Luis Manuel Seijas of Colombia’s Independiente Santa Fe has also been touted for a place in the line-up. If both men start, then Lucena will be more than likely at the back with Seijas partnering captain Tomás Rincón in defensive midfield – that is, if El General of Genoa has recovered from his injury.

First-team spots have also been rumoured for the versatile right-back/wide-man Alexander González (Young Boys) and centre-back Wilker Ángel (Deportivo Táchira), who both scored the last time Venezuela played in La Paz in a 3-2 defeat in November 2014. So long as he has shaken off his minor injury then first-choice goalkeeper Alain Baroja (AEK Athens) will be between the sticks. Once again, the attacking positions are the hardest to predict though, if utilised effectively, there is certainly talent in the 20-man squad: Josef Martínez (Torino), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, on loan from Benfica), Juan Falcón (Metz) and Mario Rondón (Shijiazhuang Ever Bright) may all be granted a chance to wangle their respective ways into the long-term thinking of Chita.

Regarding potential starters from the home-based crop, aside from Ángel, few strong rumours exist though Sanvicente has said he is keen on giving youth a chance. If he follows through on this, many fans will be keen to see international debuts granted to 20-year-olds Carlos Cermeño, a highly rated defence-minded player at Táchira, and Caracas’ attacking full-back, Jefre Vargas. However, one youngster who will not be featuring is the league’s top-scorer, 21-year-old Manuel Arteaga who, despite intiially being called up to the full squad, was the victim of some kind of communication failure between his club and country and so was unable to make the trip. On a more experienced note, midfielder Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira) can not be too far away from a starting berth, having featured as a substitute against Brazil.

Who from this group will be in a state to play against Ecuador is anyone’s guess though it can be said with the closest thing to certainty that the following cracks will start in Puerto Ordaz: right-back Roberto Rosales (Málaga), centre-back Oswaldo Vizcarrondo (Nantes) and striker Salomón Rondón (West Bromwich Albion).

The locals as well as most fans will also be keen to see Christian Santos and Jeffrén Suárez, two men born in the state but who were raised in other countries and who have only in the past year acquired the relevant citizenship documentation to represent La Vinotinto. The former in particular has been in eye-catching form, banging in 9 goals in 12 games for NEC Nijmegen in his debut season in the Dutch Eredivisie. The latter has also shown promising form as he seeks to revitalise his career with KAS Eupen, who currently reside at the top of the Belgian second tier. One other individual who, due to injury troubles, is featuring in his first international squad since he ran the show away to Honduras in February is 23-year-old Rómulo Otero (Huachipato). For some, a possible successor to Juan Arango, this Chile-based playmaker has long been tipped for a long-term spell in the first team.

Alas, this is all largely educated conjecture at this stage. On matchdays, Sanvicente’s line-ups tend to be revealed in advance to the press, so those interested in being in the know at least a couple of hours before kick-off should either return to this page for a short update or follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter. Otherwise, enjoy the games and feel free to return for some thoughts on them in the upcoming week.

UPDATE (12 November): This, courtesy of @SoccerDataVEN, is the Venezuela line-up that will face Bolivia:

venezuelavsbolivialineup

Full Venezuela Squad

Goalkeepers: Alain Baroja (AEK Athens), José Contreras (Deportivo Táchira) and Wuilker Faríñez (Caracas FC).

Defenders: Wilker Ángel (Deportivo Táchira), Francisco Carabalí (Mineros de Guayana), Carlos Cermeño (Deportivo Táchira), Jhon Chancellor (Mineros de Guayana), Gabriel Cichero (Sion), Alexander González (Young Boys), Roberto Rosales (Málaga), Jefre Vargas (Caracas FC), José Manuel Velásquez (Arouca) and Oswaldo Vizcarrondo (Nantes).

Midfielders: Rafael Acosta (Mineros de Guayana), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), César González (Deportivo Táchira), Jacobo Kouffati (Deportivo Lara), Franklin Lucena (Once Caldas, on loan from Deportivo La Guaira), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, on loan from Benfica), Rómulo Otero (Huachipato), Tomás Rincón (Genoa), Luis Manuel Seijas (Independiente Santa Fe) and Ronald Vargas (AEK Athens).

Forwards: Richard Blanco (Mineros de Guayana), Juan Falcón (Metz), Josef Martínez (Torino), Mario Rondón (Shijiazhuang Ever Bright), Salomón Rondón (West Bromwich Albion), Christian Santos (NEC Nijmegen) and Jeffren Suárez (KAS Eupen),

Notes: Fernando Amorebieta (Middlesbrough, on loan from Fulham) and Juan Pablo Añor (Málaga) were initially called up to the 33-man squad but have since been ruled out due to injury.

Also, Manuel Arteaga (Zulia) was also in the initial squad but has been unable to join up with the group following a communication problem between his club and the Venezuelan football association (FVF).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical