Tag Archives: Liga Movistar

Trujillanos 0-0 Deportivo Táchira – 2014/15 Venezuelan Primera División Gran Final First Leg (10 May 2015) (Plus Serie Pre-Sudamericana Updates & the Aquiles Ocanto incident)

2014/15 Venezuelan Primera División Gran Final First Leg

Sunday 10 May 2015 – Estadio José Alberto Pérez, Valera, Trujillo State

Trujillanos 0-0 Deportivo Táchira

Video Highlights of Trujillanos 0-0 Deportivo Táchira, 2014/15 Venezuelan Primera División Gran Final First Leg, 10 May 2015 (courtesy of Youtube account Highlights Venezuela)

Bore Draw At Least Ensures a Competitive Venezuelan Finale 

Whether it was due to the 33 degrees heat, the attacking limitations of the hosts and/or the defensive approach of the visitors, Trujillanos and Táchira served up a forgettable encounter unbefitting of this showpiece occasion.

Pre-game, there were fears that the home side would expose themselves as being out of their depth, having endured a considerable fall from grace since winning the Torneo Apertura in December, losing some key players as they limped to a 11th-placed finish in the Clausura. However, though they failed to make a breakthrough in this game, they did dominate the majority of play, with the Clausura-winning visitors having largely been set up to contain and frustrate them. As Táchira possess the best attack in the league (64 goals in their 34 games this season), this was a somewhat unanticipated approach and one that could not be said to have been forced upon manager Daniel Farías. Indeed, his side may have had three first-team regulars out suspended following an accumulation of yellow cards – Gerzon Chacón, Wilker Ángel and Jorge Rojas – but only the latter of these plays in a forward position. Instead, the 33-year-old boss was very much the architect of his side’s reserved tactics, even benching 20-goal top-scorer Gelmin Rivas. Seemingly, this move was to help facilitate counter-attacks for the more mobile Yohandry Orozco and José Alí Meza to run onto and spearhead – something that never really occurred.

Thus, Trujillanos were to enjoy more of the ball in opposition territory though, to give Farías credit, the Táchira rearguard was largely successful in repeatedly blocking off key passes and not allowing their opponents many clear opportunities. Arguably the best chance Los Guerreros de la Montaña were to have was their first of note, which came after just seven minutes. Alfredo Padilla’s cross from the right was met by Sergio Álvarez, who flicked on a header at the near post that the visitors’ goalkeeper Alan Liebeskind did well to block at close range. This was a rare instance of one of Padilla’s many crosses in the game actually being connected with – had his side managed to keep ahold of strikers James Cabezas and Freddys Arrieta after the Apertura win, one wonders if Trujillanos would have had more joy from this mode of attack.

Up the other end, Táchira only really had two moments of note in this half yet as one was a low cross that evaded everyone and the other was a passing move that fell apart before a shot could even be struck, one would not wish to overstate the threat of these. Indeed, the only other chance of significance in the opening period came from Trujillanos in stoppage-time as Maurice Cova curled a fine free-kick from 25 yards that Liebeskind did well to tip over for a corner.

Regarding the second-half, while a lack of information provided on this period in a match report is often symptomatic of the writer having to make sacrifices in order to get an on-the-whistle article finished on time, readers can be assured that in this case it is simply because little of note occurred. Indeed, to succinctly summarise: Trujillanos dominated but continued to be thwarted in the final third, having even fewer opportunities than in the first half and Táchira barely mustered an attack worth mentioning, with Rivas’ introduction 20 minutes from time predictably changing nothing. Nevertheless, whether the away fans were pleased with their team’s tactical display, celebrating the Clausura title win or were simply amusing themselves, they were to see out the game by repeatedly jumping up and down while emitting something approaching euphoria

Hopefully, both sets of players will take some of this spirit with them into the decisive leg in San Cristóbal next weekend as, if there is anything positive to say about this match, it is that both teams will still feel that they have a strong chance of claiming the championship. Indeed, though Táchira will feel happier with this result and will go into the final game as strong favourites with a more attacking approach, the scoreline ensures that Trujillanos still retain some hope of causing what would be considered an upset.

To find out how the finale to the Venezuelan season pans out, keep checking back here and, if you are not already, please follow the Twitter account @DarrenSpherical.

Serie Pre-Sudamericana

Starting at the same time as the Gran Final, there is also a post-season tournament to determine the two remaining Venezuelan entrants into the 2015 Copa Sudamericana. Eight teams are participating and following the next round, all will have been decided. For more information on how the competition works, check out the bottom of this article, but in the meantime, here are the results of the first legs of the first round of games (also played on 10 May):

Tucanes de Amazonas 0-0 Mineros de Guayana

Estudiantes de Mérida 1-2 Zamora

Carabobo 1-0 Aragua

Atlético Venezuela 1-0 Deportivo Lara


On Wednesday 13 May, the second legs of these games were played. Here are the results:

Mineros de Guayana 3-0 Tucanes de Amazonas (Mineros de Guayana won 3-0 on aggregate)

Zamora 4-2 Estudiantes de Mérida (Zamora won 6-3 on aggregate)

Aragua 0-0 Carabobo (Carabobo won 1-0 on aggregate)

Deportivo Lara 2-0 Atlético Venezuela (Deportivo Lara won 2-1 on aggregate)

Consequently, the two Copa Sudamericana places will be decided in two separate games over two legs played on 17 and 20 May. Mineros de Guayana will face Zamora and Carabobo will play against Deportivo Lara.

Carabobo’s Aquiles Ocanto Savagely Attacked on Pitch By Rival Fan

Before signing off, one feels obliged to briefly mention a rather unsavoury incident that occurred after the game between Aragua and Carabobo – two rival teams from neighbouring states. Aquiles Ocanto, the visitors’ top scorer in the league and whose goal in the first leg ultimately decided this tie, was the victim of a vicious assault by a fan after the game. Indeed, Ocanto was being interviewed live by a TeleAragua presenter on the pitch when suddenly an intruder ran up behind him and jumped, knees first, into the player’s back, savagely knocking him to the ground.

Video of Pitch Invader’s Assault of Aquiles Ocanto after Aragua 0-0 Carabobo, Serie Pre-Sudamericana (Venezuela), 13 May 2015 (courtesy of TeleAragua).

The offender has since allegedly been identified online and Ocanto, who made his international debut against Honduras in February, is reportedly fine with no serious injuries. Unsurprisingly this incident has made the news far outside of Venezuela’s borders with, amongst others, the websites of The Guardian and The Metro – two British publications – picking up the story. While this was certainly newsworthy, it is a pity that leagues off the radar of the average European fan only tend to be of interest to editors and journalists when something disgraceful or bizarre that has little to do with football occurs. Such is the way of the world. Nevertheless, in a humble attempt to go some way towards rectifying this, it is politely recommended that any readers who came to this website off the back of this story check out how the final day of the Venezuelan Torneo Clausura ended – who knows, you may be pleasantly surprised.

Darren Spherical


Wilker is Táchira’s Ángel as the Clausura-deciding Clásico Ends In Sensational Fashion

2015 Venezuelan Torneo Clausura (Final Day)

Sunday 3 May 2015 – Estadio Olímpico de la UCV, Caracas

 Caracas FC 2-2 Deportivo Táchira 

Video Highlights of Caracas FC 2-2 Deportivo Táchira, 2015 Venezuelan Torneo Clausura, 3 May 2015 (Video courtesy of Highlights Venezuela)

Ángel is the Clásico Saviour at the Death for Clausura Champions Táchira 

What began as one of the most highly anticipated matches in Venezuelan football history ended as one of the most memorable as with virtually the last touch Wilker Ángel silenced the raucous Caracas hordes to snatch a sensational Torneo Clausura title win for the hosts’ bitter clásico rivals, Deportivo Táchira. 

Click Here to Watch a Fan’s Eye View of Wilker Ángel’s Last-Gasp Goal.

The 22-year-old centre-back was far from the most predictable hero yet, having reportedly attracted interest from teams elsewhere in South America as well as Europe, whatever his future holds, he can be assured of a place in the folklore of Los Aurinegros. Only seconds before his last-gasp deed, the majority of the full-capacity Estadio Olímpico de la UCV had been booming out rhythmic chants of ‘Dale Ro’ (a contraction which in full would translate as ‘Come on, Reds’), anticipating Los Rojos del Ávila to be soon parading the Clausura trophy around the pitch following this final-day encounter. They had, after all, come into the game with 38 points to Táchira’s 40 and thus needed a win in order to lift the silverware – something they appeared to have achieved following top-scorer Edder Farías’ 80th-minute strike that put them in front for the first time in the game.

However, all of the euphoria that greeted this goal and then continued for the following 13 minutes was to be abruptly quashed in the fourth and final minute of stoppage-time. After one of several late, desperate Táchira attacks broke down, the ball was immediately hoisted from their half all the way back downfield. Bouncing into the Caracas area kindly for Yuber Mosquera, the Colombian remarkably hooked it over to his fellow defensive team-mate Ángel, who benefited from some lax tracking to head the ball in what seemed like slow motion past the frozen Alain Baroja. The home fans’ sudden loss of voice – with the exception of some stray horrified screams – was in stark contrast to the uncontainable roars of joy that could be heard in the distance at the opposite end of the ground. Like a magnetic force comprising of Táchira’s collective spirit, they were to attract Ángel, who dashed all the way back to his own half before falling onto his knees in front of them, raising out his arms Christ-like to embrace the acclaim befitting such a saviour. To no avail, one member of the Táchira backroom staff – who just seconds before was celebrating with arguably even fewer inhibitions – soon rushed onto the pitch to urge him back up and to ensure he maintained focus. Indeed, Ángel, smiling from ear to ear, was physically and mentally in dreamland. With the final whistle blowing almost as soon as the restart, his giddy lack of composure mattered not a jot as he and his team-mates were suddenly free to savour their breathtaking accomplishment on enemy territory.


Wilker Ángel celebrating his Clausura-winning goal for Deportivo Táchira (Imagery courtesy of DirecTV)

Considered as a whole, it was a fair result but that made it no less crushing for Caracas and particularly their goalkeeper, Alain Baroja. Indeed, having recently solidified his place as the national team’s second choice, he has been making strong claims throughout the campaign to become the future number one. Here, though he had no chance with Yohandry Orozco’s close-range volley in the 70th minute that rattled off the bar, he did particularly well in the 83rd minute to keep his side’s title dream alive. Firstly, he made a spectacular save from Jorge Rojas’ curler from the edge of the area and then made a dramatic double-stop from the resulting corner, initially blocking a header and then smothering Javier López’s rebound. Alas, as soon as Ángel’s header agonisingly bypassed him into the vacant opposite corner he knew that the game was up and could do little more than cover his crestfallen face with his shirt. Though he missed out on being the designated hero of the day by the tightest of margins, Baroja can at least be assured that his reputation has been further bolstered following this outing.

With the propensity for top South American talent to be snapped up after the earliest signs of promise, quite what the future holds for the likes of Baroja and his talented team-mates remains to be seen. The capital’s finest, with 11 overall championships to their name and a strong record of producing quality exports, are the most successful side in Venezuelan history and, irrespective of the final outcome, had a season to be proud of. Indeed, while they finished 2nd in the Clausura and 3rd in the Apertura, they accumulated the highest amount of points overall (70, to Táchira’s 64).

Nevertheless, while some – particularly those accustomed to European league formats – may quibble with the domestic structures that mean Caracas will finish the season empty-handed (barring a Copa Libertadores Qualifying Round berth), there can be little doubt that Táchira earned this Clausura title. Indeed, unlike Caracas, they were fighting on two fronts throughout, having to first qualify for the Copa Libertadores over two legs against Paraguayans Cerro Porteño and then play six, often demoralising, group games. These eight additional matches caused significant disruptions to their schedule as up until the closing stages of the campaign, they were to regularly find themselves two to three games behind their domestic rivals. This made their run-in comparatively onerous as before the 18/19 April weekend of league fixtures, they were four points behind Caracas with two games in hand and yet the five remaining matches they were to play over the final 16 days of the Clausura could scarcely have been tougher. However, with considerable stamina and character, they won the first four of these, starting with a 2-1 away victory at Deportivo La Guaira (who finished 7th, but were narrow runners-up in the Apertura as well as Copa Venezuela winners), then 2-1 at home to Deportivo Anzoátegui (finished 4th), a narrow 1-0 at home to last year’s champions Zamora (finished 3rd) and then a relatively comfortable 3-0 home defeat of Deportivo Lara (finished 5th).

With this final win in this remarkable string of results, they finally overtook Caracas and led them by two points going into the final encounter. As has been relayed, despite the manner in which the draw was ultimately achieved, they were far from unworthy of the result and were to approach the game with few visible signs of exhaustion. Indeed, capitalising on a misdirected header from Jhonder Cádiz, César González blasted them into the lead with less than a quarter of an hour gone and was to have no qualms about celebrating against the club he represented from 2005-07. Following this, although Félix Cásseres was to strike the hosts level midway through the first half with a pearl of a shot and Edder Farías put them ahead late on, Táchira more than held their own in terms of chances created and, were it not for the crossbar and Baroja, could have wrapped up the title in far less dramatic circumstances. Thus, Ángel’s goal, as heartbreaking for Caracas and unexpected for everyone else as it may have been, ultimately topped off a thoroughly well-fought campaign.

When all was said and done, from a neutral’s standpoint, this clásico del fútbol venezolano certainly lived up to the billing and was a fine advertisement for domestic football in this often overlooked South American nation. Not just on the pitch, but also in the stands as, barring the empty section to help effectively segregate these rival fans, the ground was full of spectactors and noise from the first whistle to the last. Barring a bottle that connected with the head of José Miguel Reyes on his side’s victory lap, the behaviour was also significantly better than was feared (according to the latest reports, at least, although quite a few knives were allegedly seized by police). No doubt this was aided by the many individuals who were reportedly on hand to keep a vigilant look-out for trouble: 600 members of the Policía Nacional Bolivariana (and their canines), 270 private security personnel, 150 members of the Guardia Nacional, the fire brigade and countless more.

Given that this derby once infamously ended with the Caracas team bus being commandeered onto the pitch and then set alight in flames, many who want to see the nation’s domestic game flourish will be cautiously optimistic following how events transpired this time around. This was in marked contrast to how the finale of the Torneo Apertura ended in the same stadium, when fellow tenants Deportivo Petare had their game abandoned after 52 minutes against eventual title-winners Trujillanos due to a lack of security to deal with some youths who were throwing objects from outside the perimeter gates and issuing threats.

Whether Venezuelan domestic football has really moved on in this area may take years to determine but nevertheless, next on the agenda for Táchira will be the two-legged Gran Final against Trujillanos, the winner of which will be crowned the overall 2014/15 season champions. The first leg will be the away encounter for Táchira in Valera on Sunday 10 May with the return game being played on home soil in San Cristóbal on 17 May. As their more modest opposition have lost a few key players since their December triumph, Táchira will be hot favourites to add another estrella to their crest and claim their eighth league championship.

To find out how they get on as well as to read a more broad look back at the Torneo Clausura please keep checking back to this site in the near future and, if you are not already, consider following this site’s affiliated Twitter account, @DarrenSpherical.

Darren Spherical


Don’t Call It a Comeback

…but it has been a while, hasn’t it?

This Happened

Those who have followed this site since around the time of its mid-July inception will know that The Ball is Hispanospherical started out, like many a half-baked online project, with some rather nauseating, reality-denying enthusiasm. Over time, this was tempered by the struggle to write updates that adequately reflected, and did justice to, the sizeable scope of interest outlined in the inaugural proclamations. Possessing the requisite time to write these articles has been, unsurprisingly, the chief underlying obstacle and, despite having reluctantly sacrificed certain topics in order to provide at least some substantial, albeit reduced, coverage, personal dissatisfaction with this state of affairs lingered. Consequently, in mid-September a rather hastily written post was published that alluded to a ‘fleeting moment of joy’ being partially responsible for the time-constraints and forewarned readers that updates may be even less forthcoming in the foreseeable future, as proved to be the case.

However, that temporary spell on loan to society has expired and, having traipsed back to seclusion, an abundance of free time has now become available. Thus, having spent the last few weeks doing some essential catching-up, the moment has finally arrived for us all to become reacquainted and, hopefully, for some new readers to become ensnared, willingly or otherwise. Before any new articles are written however, allow me first to clarify, having acknowledged the aforementioned experiences and given consideration to potential problems, what the refined focus of The Ball is Hispanospherical will be.

This is Happening

Although this site and its aligned Twitter account were created at around the same time, it was not originally anticipated that the latter would be used as much as it has been, as it gradually assumed a superior role to the former. Addictive, isn’t it? This imbalance needs to be redressed somewhat, though Hispanospherical  will very much be proceeding with both the site and Twitter being used in cahoots with one another. Anyone who has followed on Twitter (@DarrenSpherical, since you asked), particularly when no updates to the site were being published, may have been unsure as to what exactly they had stumbled upon. Indeed, as time progressed with the noted problems becoming more apparent, the social networking page was exclusively covering a lot of areas that were originally designated for this site. Given the transient visibility of most tweets, the average follower may have been none-the-wiser about the account’s precise purpose, which would have been further understandable as the stated scope – football coverage of Spanish-speaking nations and wherever Spanish-speakers are playing – is evasively and generously broad.

Therefore, to clear things up to some extent, what follows is a list of topics and themes that, for the foreseeable future at least, I intend to cover on Twitter and, when possible, this website:

Venezuelans Abroad

Visitors to either the site or the Twitter account will know that this has been the most common subject. Venezuela currently have several dozen players scattered around the globe, with some of the most talented plying their trade in top Europeans leagues such as Spain, Italy, Portugal, France and Russia. Others can be found playing crucial roles for their sides in countries such as Colombia, USA, Mexico, Qatar, Thailand and elsewhere. It is hoped that tracking these players over the four continents in which they can be found will not only interest those who wish to know more about one of the least mythologised nations of CONMEBOL, but also appeal to like-minded individuals who share a global perspective on the game.

While the Twitter account will continue to track the club games which feature players either in or on the cusp of the national side, this site will no longer be devoted to providing match reports. No doubt some more will appear in the future, but most likely only for very big encounters, such as title-deciding matches and cup finals. Instead, to make this area more manageable, I will be dedicated to writing features that are not quite so time-contingent and either relate to an individual player or several of them collectively. Ideas for articles have long been threatening to come to fruition and will hopefully all be fleshed out and up on the site by the end of the year.

Venezuela’s National Side (La Vinotinto)

Inextricably linked to the above area of interest, though thus far not given as much prominence simply due to only two international games having been played since the start of the season (both in early September). However, with two friendlies lined up this month against Chile and Bolivia as well as next year’s alluring twin stand-up-and-be-counted attractions, the Copa América and the commencement of the long road to qualification for the 2018 World Cup, expect in future to see some extensive pieces concerning the Noel Sanvicente era. Match reports will continue to be posted for this area of interest and, wherever possible, match previews and catch-up summaries should also make an appearance.

While it may have not seemed the case thus far, the Venezuelan national side is the central, guiding topic of this website though as with most matters of the heart, I would struggle to give a rational explanation as to why.

Venezuelan Domestic Football

Much as the Liga Movistar offers quality, intrigue and much else besides, with so many other leagues competing for the attention of fans, coverage on both Twitter and this site has been intentionally limited. Indeed, though part of the motivation behind starting this site was to shine some light on areas hitherto off the radar of the average English-speaking football fan, it was never the intention to be writing primarily for the benefit of insomniacs, contrarians and/or online gamblers (though these groups are very much welcome!).

Thus, so far, while a couple of thinking-while-typing articles did appear on this site in early August, Twitter has been the main preserve of this area. The focus of the coverage has largely been on the following: leading players (national team members, emerging youngsters, experienced ex-Vinotinto players etc.), the top sides involved in the title-race as well as those who had a brief spell in the Copa Sudamericana (most notably, Caracas FC), as well as any stories of interest (such as the Copa Venezuela run of second-tier Arroceros de Calabozo, who are preparing for a semi-final tie, having defeated top-flight sides Tucanes, cup-holders Caracas and Metropolitanos).

I will continue in this vein on Twitter, though am hesitant to make any commitments regarding articles on this website. Gaining comprehensive access to the Venezuelan domestic game is seemingly impossible for even those who live in the country, so irrespective of the miniscule Anglophone audience for this league, providing substantial coverage is rather problematic. Nevertheless, if any articles do emerge on this site, they will more than likely be concerned with the battles for the Apertura, Clausura and the Gran Final in May, as well as the progress of the three teams (Zamora, Mineros de Guayana and Deportivo Táchira) who have qualified for the Copa Libertadores.

International Teams and Players from Latin America 

According to the broadest definition of Latin America, the region constitutes just over 25 nations. Understandably, one person can not cover all of these and I do not intend to. Instead, given the primary interest in Venezuela and the desire to provide substantial coverage of the Copa América as well as the South American World Cup Qualifying process, when the international breaks occur attention will turn (as it has already) largely to the nine other nations in the CONMEBOL region (Brazil may not be Spanish-speaking but it seems churlish to ignore the one exception). If time allows for it – as it did in October – then some of the other Spanish-speaking nations from CONCACAF, such as Mexico and Costa Rica, will also be featured to varying degrees, though I am very conscious of spreading myself too thin.

For the majority of the year when players are with their club paymasters, I will endeavour to draw attention to Latin (primarily South) American footballers wherever possible, whether that be in games I am watching or in news articles I have read.

How all of this transfers into articles on this site remains to be seen, as it is probable that the first time a substantial number of words are expended on a Latin American nation other than Venezuela will not be until at least the Copa América.

Spanish Domestic Football

Followers on Twitter may have noticed me taking advantage of the near-200 top-flight games that are being broadcast in the UK this season, often giving updates of matches whenever time permits. Attention has largely been focused on ‘Los Otros 18’ sides as there is no shortage of coverage of the other two. The two teams that have featured the most are the ones that have Venezuelans in their ranks: Málaga (Roberto Rosales and Juan Pablo Añor) and Granada (Darwin Machís). All the other teams are very much of interest to me – particularly the two less-fancied sides of the Comunidad de Madrid, Rayo Vallecano and Getafe – but again, time is a barrier.

Thus, while on Twitter I will continue to provide match updates and news as well as venturing some opinions of my own, if any articles appear on this website, they will more than likely be rather general in nature relating to the league as a whole or, possibly, lengthy research pieces on Málaga and/or Granada.


No doubt other topics will emerge as potential candidates for articles. As can be gleaned from this update, I do have a habit of writing at length so am rather keen on undertaking some considerable research and then constructing extensive, and hopefully insightful, longform pieces. Ideas are welcome though I do already have some of my own that may or may not see the light of day.

Nevertheless, regardless of what does and does not come to fruition, I hope you now have a better idea of what my intentions are and feel curious enough to return to this site from time to time or at least follow me on Twitter. While there will not be one person who is attracted to everything that will be covered (if there is, I’m not sure even I would like to meet them), I hope that I can provide at least something of interest to everyone who passes by. I look forward to continuing what is, effectively, as cringeworthy as it sounds, language-driven football coverage and hope to get into contact with as many varied people as possible.