Tag Archives: Lionel Scaloni

Argentina 2-0 Venezuela – Copa América 2019 Quarter-Final (28 June 2019)

History repeats itself in Rio. Here, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto’Copa América 2019 exit to Argentina.

Copa América 2019 – Quarter-Final

Friday 28 June 2019 – Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro.

Argentina 2-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Argentina 2-0 Venezuela, Copa América Quarter-Final, 28 June 2019 (YouTube)

There’s Always Next Year

Venezuela’s unbeaten streak came abruptly to an end at the Maracanã, as for the second successive tournament, La Vinotinto were eliminated at the quarter-final stage by Argentina.

Coming into the game, Rafael Dudamel’s men were fancied by more than a few to cause an upset, yet on the day this never once came close to fruition. Indeed, Argentina were first out of the blocks and that is where they remained. In the third minute, Sergio Agüero’s shot from an angle was saved by the feet of goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez and then four minutes later, a knock-on from a corner found defender Germán Pezzella. However, it must have taken him by surprise as, despite being in a very advantageous position, his control let him down and Faríñez instead gratefully received the ball.

Nevertheless, it was only a matter of a time. Thus, a 10th-minute Lionel Messi corner founds its way to Agüero whose low effort back into the mixer was skilfully backheeled into the back of the net by Inter Milan’s Lautaro Martínez to make it 1-0.

Subsequently, Venezuela did occasionally make it forward – Darwin Machís, in particular, often driving at Juan Foyth – but in the first half they never managed to test the gloves of Franco Armani. Gradually, goalmouth action at either end died down, with instead the card count rising: five yellows by the break, with a red seeming inevitable.

Overall, Venezuela’s best first-half chance – a 40th-minute Jhon Chancellor header from a Júnior Moreno corner, which went comfortably over – was barely worthy of the description. Instead, Argentina, without being dominant or particularly eye-catching, were the more creative side and were close to doubling their lead in stoppage-time when Marcos Acuña’s low cross to the back post was only narrowly knocked away from the looming Martínez by Roberto Rosales.

Soon after the restart in the 48th minute, Martínez had a better chance to net for a second time when he was played through by Leandro Paredes yet, despite his promising his position, his strike hit the outside of the post and went out.

However, this did not lead to an Albiceleste avalanche, as instead things became a little more even. Finally, in the 71st minute, Venezuela were able to fashion a substantial opportunity when captain Tomás Rincón chipped the ball into the area where it was met by right-back Ronald Hernández whose shot from close range had to be parried by Armani.

Yet, just three minutes later, any hope of taking the game to penalties was virtually extinguished. Rather, Argentina doubled their lead after Giovani Lo Celso tapped in the ball after Faríñez badly spilled a relatively tame shot from Agüero. It has to be said that it has not been a successful showcase for the Millonarios goalkeeper who, despite making an important stop against Peru, was also fortunate to get away with two mistakes in that game as well as with another against Bolivia. Ultimately, his luck, along with that of his team, ran out in Rio de Janeiro, but at just 21, age is still most definitely on his side.

Before the 90 minutes were up, Venezuela had one more opportunity – a Salomón Rondón header from a Moreno corner which Armani had to instinctively parry – but alas, it was Argentina who progressed to the semi-final date with Brazil.

Taking everything into account, it is somewhat difficult to judge Venezuela’s Copa América campaign. On the one hand, they went unbeaten in their group and even drew with the hosts, yet on the other, they once again frequently looked bereft of ideas when going forward and fell at the same hurdle as in 2016, despite having recently beaten Argentina in a friendly. Inevitably, many fans have voiced their impatience with, and disapproval of, Dudamel’s caution-first approach and he will know as well as anyone the limitations of seeking to frustrate the more illustrious sides whilst hoping a goal can be snatched at the other end.

Still, although it may not feel this way now, by most people’s standards, Venezuela have, at the very least, equalled pre-tournament expectations, if not slightly surpassed them. Their team is relatively settled and they can take what they have gained into the end-of-year friendlies, ahead of next year’s qualifiers for Qatar 2022: the ultimate objective.

Team Selections

Argentina (4-3-3): F. Armani; J. Foyth, G. Pezzella, N. Otamendi, N. Tagliafico; R. De Paul, L. Paredes (G. Lo Celso, 68′), M. Acuña; L. Messi, L. Martínez (Á. Di María, 64′) & S. Agüero (P. Dybala, 85′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, L. Mago (Y. Soteldo, 55′), R. Rosales (L. Seijas, 84′); J. Moreno, Y. Herrera, T. Rincón; J. Murillo, D. Machís (J. Martínez, 71′); S. Rondón.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Argentina 1-3 Venezuela – International Friendly (22 March 2019)

On a refined stage in the Spanish capital, La Vinotinto superbly displayed the potential that all followers knew was lurking somewhere. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides a match report of this breakthrough result…

International Friendly

Friday 22 March 2019 – Estadio Wanda Metropolitano, Madrid, Spain

Argentina 1-3 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Argentina 1-3 Venezuela, International Friendly, 22 March 2019 (YouTube)

Dynamic Venezuela Dazzle and Destroy

A fired-up Venezuela put in an exhilarating performance to deservedly defeat their more illustrious opponents for only the second time in their history.

To most neutrals, the game held at the home of Atlético Madrid was perceived as “Lionel Messi’s somewhat-anticipated Albiceleste comeback”, but not long after kick-off, a different, more captivating, story began to emerge.

Barely five minutes into the game, mask-wearing Roberto Rosales – situated on the left of defence, with U20 World-Cup runner-up Ronald Hernández over on his more customary right side – took the Argentine back-line by surprise with a sublime diagonal ball from the half-way line. It was received by Salomón Rondón who, with an aesthetically-pleasing blend of panache and aplomb, evaded his marker Gabriel Mercado, athletically controlling the incoming pin-point pass and striking the ball home with the outside of his right boot to give Venezuela the lead.

Behind, Lionel Scaloni’s side were spurred into action, with their no. 10 often attempting to orchestrate attacks by spraying balls to the flanks and weaving inside. However, it was never one-way traffic and for the following twenty minutes, the Argentines struggled to direct any meaningful attempts on target, with the opposition rearguard instead compact and regularly on cue to thwart. Despite this absence of genuine goalmouth action, it was nevertheless a keenly contested encounter that often required the referee to intervene: by the end of the night Venezuela would also go on to win the yellow cards battle, 6-2.

When Argentina did finally make the opposition goalkeeper work, it was worth the wait. This occurred at the half-hour mark when Messi jinked his way past three opponents before crossing a left-sided ball into the area that Lautaro Martínez powerfully headed. Many assumed that it was a certain goal but the Inter striker’s erstwhile Under-20 foe Wuilker Faríñez spectacularly managed to get a hand to it and divert the ball over.

This electrified the crowd and ushered in a chance-laden final 15 minutes of the first half. In the 35th minute, Venezuela could easily have made it two after Jhon Murillo played a ball through the middle to Darwin Machís who, virtually one-on-one with a defender scrambling over towards him, had his low effort saved by the feet of goalkeeper Franco Armani.

It was a let-off for Argentina, who two minutes later had a somewhat speculative Messi effort tipped over, but soon afterwards, their own goal was once again under threat. This time, Machís tenaciously evaded some challenges to nudge the ball to Hernández, who crossed the ball to the back post where Rondón’s header went past his marker Juan Foyth, goalkeeper Armani and, agonisingly, the back post. In the centre, Murillo voiced his displeasure at the lack of a knock-back.

However, the Tondela winger was to soon forget about that. Indeed, on the left side of the pitch just before half time, the alert Rosales quickly passed a free-kick to Murillo who, on the edge of the area, cut past Foyth and onto his right to curl an absolute pearl into the far corner. A fantastic way to cap off an eye-grabbing 45 minutes from La Vinotinto.

Following the interval, Argentina understandably resumed the game with three different players on the pitch. However, for the first 13 minutes of the second half, although Scaloni’s men won the possession stats battle, they did not give Faríñez much to do. This changed suddenly in the 59th minute when a rapid counter-attack saw Messi spray the ball to Giovani Lo Celso who, in turn, split the Venezuelan defence with a pass to Martínez, who swept the ball home.

With the deficit reduced, there was much anticipation that Argentina would at least get back on level terms. Yet, although they caused a fright soon after the goal with a knock-back across an uncertain area and there was also audible expectation whenever Messi was on the ball, they did not seriously test the goalkeeper’s gloves in the remaining thirty minutes.

Not that much more could be said for Dudamel’s men, but then, they were not the ones chasing the game. They stayed strong and defiant, never looking too flustered; they also made a couple of substitutions. It was to be these two reinforcements who were to play the leading roles in striking the knockout blow. Indeed, in the 74th minute, Yeferson Soteldo slid a ball into the area for Josef Martínez who – some may feel the forward engineered the contact – was adjudged to have been obstructed by the hapless Foyth. Subsequently, in his patented, gravity-defying manner, as seen multiple times before in the MLS, the Atlanta United hotshot stepped up to confidently dispatch.

With the game very much heading their way, in the 80th minute the thousands of Vinotinto fans present began to “olé” every pass. It was that kind of a night. Aside from two Messi free-kicks over the crossbar, there was little else for them to be concerned by. Just before the 90 minutes elapsed on this unforgettable night for Venezuelan football, another historic moment took place as recent U20 starlet Jan Carlos Hurtado made his senior debut and even found time to squeeze in one of his bustling, rampaging runs.

When the final whistle blew, although Argentina had huffed and puffed, nobody could dispute that this was a well-deserved victory for their northerly counterparts. Perhaps it was not a triumph from completely out of the blue, but given Venezuela’s mixed run late last year after ten months without any games, it was certainly not wholly anticipated either.

Many  things can and will change before June, but may this wonderful night of composed, confident and deadly effective football serve as a launchpad and clarion call for a more prosperous future. The countdown to the Copa América begins here.

Aftermath

Unfortunately, it must be briefly noted that the result has been somewhat marred by politics. Prior to kick-off a photograph was published online of Dudamel and his side being officially received by Antonio Ecarri, the ambassador to Spain for the partially-recognised – that is, by millions of citizens as well as dozens of leading nations – President Juan Guaidó. The manager has since stated that, although it has been “politicised”, for him there was nothing partisan about this meeting, highlighting the fact that in the past he has also met with ambassadors of the current Miraflores Palace-occupant, President Nicolás Maduro. Evidently frustrated at the awkward tightrope he is currently navigating, he has thus offered his resignation to the country’s football federation (FVF). He is still set to take charge of Monday’s game with Catalonia – for which, Xavi will now sadly not be available – but what happens afterwards is currently anyone’s guess.

Team Selections

Argentina (3-4-2-1): F. Armani; J. Foyth, G. Mercado (W. Kannemann, 46′), L. Martínez (D. Blanco, 46′); G. Montiel, G. Lo Celso (R. Pereyra, 78′), L. Paredes, N. Tagliafico; L. Messi, G. Martínez (M. Suárez, 46′); L. Martínez (D. Benedetto, 70′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, Y. Osorio, M. Villanueva, R. Rosales; J. Moreno, T. Rincón, Y. Herrera (Y. Soteldo, 64′); D. Machís (J. Añor, 79′), J. Murillo (J. Hurtado, 89′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 72′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical