Tag Archives: Nahuel Ferraresi

Uruguay 1-1 Venezuela (AET – 3-4 on penalties) (Semi-final, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 8 June 2017)

The first and last all-South American encounter at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup went all the way to penalties, with Rafael Dudamel’s men sensationally pulling off a breathtaking victory. @DarrenSpherical is tempted to lose the plot right here and now but has been advised to save up some of this caffeine-charged exuberance for Sunday’s surreal, you-couldn’t-make-it-up Final with England – England! Bloody never mind Venezuela, ENGLAND! – where he may be afforded a grander opportunity to really let loose. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, a double-helping of armchair talent-tracking…

uruguayvenezuela

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Uruguay 1-1 Venezuela (AET – 3-4 on penalties)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Semi-final, 8 June 2017 (YouTube)

Thanks to a spectacular last-minute free-kick and some heart-stopping penalty saves, this remarkable Venezuelan generation inched their way past CONMEBOL rivals Uruguay to incredibly gain a place in the tournament Final.

They started off the game relatively well, enjoying a fair bit of possession and causing some frights. However, as the first half wore on,  Fabián Coito’s men came into their own and took the upper hand, with at least two shots of note forcing saves.

Rafael Dudamel’s charges began the second half in a similar manner to how they commenced the first, yet their momentum was to be suddenly halted when Uruguay were awarded a debatable penalty, for which the referee required the aid of video technology. Undeterred by the hullabaloo, captain Nicolás De La Cruz stepped up to convert to make it 1-0. Soon afterwards, Nicolás Schiappacasse was provided with a very presentable chance to double his nation’s lead, though was denied by Wuilker Fariñez. As the match wore on, Venezuela had to try to overcome their sense of injustice regarding the penalty decision, yet though they created a few half-chances, a defeat was looking increasingly unlikely. That is, until the first minute of stoppage-time when 17-year-old substitute Samuel Sosa curled a brilliantly struck left-footed free-kick into the top corner. Cue bedlam.

The 30 minutes of extra-time were understandably nervy, particularly the second half, with both sides coming close to finding a winner. Indeed, Uruguay’s Federico Valverde appeared to be trying his luck from a variety of positions, which included an inswinging corner that would have crept in at the near post were it not for Fariñez and then, later, striking when a cross had been anticipated from a free-kick, with the goalkeeper just about re-adjusting his footing to save. Up the other end, as the clock was about to run out, Sosa’s trickery resulted in a low ball to fellow substitute Jan Hurtado, who poked an effort that hit the outside of the post.

Alas, it was to be penalties. Here, after Uruguay’s second spot-kick taker José Luis Rodríguez saw his effort saved by Fariñez, Venezuela took a commanding lead. However, when Yeferson Soteldo hit the crossbar with his nation’s fourth attempt and Uruguay subsequently levelled things up, a sudden turnaround seemed possible. Thankfully for all fans of La Mini-Vinotinto, this did not materialise, as first captain Yangel Herrera stepped up to make it 4-3 and then his opposite armband-wearer, De La Cruz, had his effort – his second 12-yarder of the game – saved by Fariñez. The goalkeeper took a few moments to realise the significance of his actions before being mobbed by his team-mates as together they celebrated this penultimate chapter in their history-making campaign.

Talent Tracking

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Despite reaching the Semi-finals, with just seven goals in their six games, Uruguay can not really be said to have been eye-catchingly potent in attack, with consistency certainly lacking in this area. Nevertheless, though he plays a somewhat deep role in midfield, one man who has, on occasion, been a threat during various tournament games – including this one – is Federico Valverde (No. 16, Real Madrid Castilla). Here, his first moment of note came in the 25th minute when his 25-yard central free-kick was struck well and swerved down low, requiring a parry out wide.

However, it was really in the second half of extra-time that he became a frequent source of danger. Indeed, in the 108th minute, he whipped in a corner that nearly reached Carlos Benavídez (No. 8, Defensor Sporting) at the near post, though a defender just about headed it a little too uncomfortably wide. Then, from the subsequent corner, Valverde’s ball almost squeezed directly in though goalkeeper Fariñez did well to recover to block with his leg. Valverde also attempted a completely wayward effort from the halfway line but his last strike of note with a few minutes remaining was far more testing. Here, he again caught Fariñez off-guard as he hit a free-kick from a deep position on the inside-left with his right, shooting for goal instead of going for the anticipated cross, which the goalkeeper was just about able to get over to in order to stop.

One attacker who has certainly had a mixed tournament is attacking-midfielder and captain, Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay). This was encapsulated in this game as he both converted a penalty within regulation time which nearly led to him being heralded as the match-winner and also failed to score the final spot-kick in the shootout, which sent his nation out. This was surely especially hard for him to take as, having embarrassingly seen his opening day penalty in CONMEBOL qualifying saved by Fariñez, he must have felt his first goal here put that particular ghost to bed. Alas, it appears not. Or, at least, not for now.

Otherwise, he didn’t have the most influential of games, though managed to put in a few decent crosses, at least one of which deserved better contact from the recipient. Furthermore, in the 98th minute, from an inside-right position he did well to skip away from a few challenges into the area before passing to Agustín Canobbio (No. 19, Fénix) – who was also the man adjudged to have been fouled for the penalty – who, from a slight angle, struck hard but a bit too close to Fariñez, who gathered after initially parrying.

De La Cruz’s most notable set-up, however, came just after his goal when he picked up a cross from Marcelo Saracchi (No. 6, Danubio) then, from the inside-right of the area, put the ball on a plate for Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid Under-19s). However, despite being barely six yards out and with plenty of the goal to aim for, the striker instead side-footed the ball at Fariñez, who nevertheless did well to instinctively thwart. Schiappacasse was ultimately withdrawn in the 67th minute owing to an apparent knock, though his replacement Joaquín Ardaiz (No. 7, Danubio) was unable to create much more than minor scares amongst the opposition back-line.

Lastly, as the only goal they conceded – just their third in six games – was from a set-piece, some credit must again go to the defence as a whole, which is full of players who could well find themselves receiving bigger moves in the not-too-distant future. Ultimately, CONMEBOL champions Uruguay will be disappointed not to have made it to the Final – and to have been knocked out by another side from their region – but they have shown both here and in qualifying that they possess many players with the potential to remain on the radars of global football fans for some years yet.

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As was implied by the above section, Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) had a fair few shots to contend with, probably the most that he has faced so far in the competition. He will justly go down as one of the two leading heroes of the game, having also saved two of the five shootout spot-kicks and thus further bolstered his penalty-saving reputation.

The other headline-grabber, without whom there would have been no 12-yard duel, is 17-year-old substitute Samuel Sosa (No. 15, Deportivo Táchira). Few were anticipating him to strike the 91st-minute free-kick from the edge of the area but strike it he did, curling a beautiful left-footed shot past Mele and into the top corner for his second tournament goal. He also impressed with some confident touches that belied his age and later on in the 108th minute had a shot from range that was hit well but comfortably saved. Finally, right at the end, he displayed a great piece of skill at the right side of the area, before setting up Jan Hurtado (No. 13, Deportivo Táchira), who nudged an effort against the near post.

Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford) was the man who looked most poised to take the free-kick that Sosa buried though, overall, it was far from his most influential game. Perhaps his best moment came less than a minute into the second half, when he skipped past a player or two before passing the ball to Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC), who hit a snap-shot from inside the area that was deflected not too far wide (20 minutes later, Chacón was to have another shot, a left-footed effort on the turn that was hit well and which Mele had to save low). Later on, in the 58th minute, Peñaranda dribbled past some opponents before striking an effort wide into the side-netting – certainly not a great chance, but it was slim pickings at times for Venezuela.

Otherwise, after having a surprise effort with just 20 seconds on the clock from nearly 35 yards out that Mele had to double-fist over, Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) once again showed what a useful provider of opportunities he is. Indeed, after 13 minutes from an inside-left position, Franklin’s younger brother curled in a fine free-kick though, despite being in a good position, Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira) was unable to make proper contact. Later on the in the 75th minute, he swung in an even more presentable chance from a corner, yet Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC) perhaps stooped a little too much and his misdirected header subsequently bounced over the bar. Then, with three minutes of regulation time left, another Lucena corner was headed over by centre-back Josua Mejías (No. 17, Carabobo FC), who was unable to get his head above the ball.

Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) was once again on the bench but was introduced to the field in the second half. He will no doubt shudder at the memory of his shootout spot-kick rebounding back off the bar, yet though it wasn’t a particularly action-filled game for the diminutive dribbler, he nevertheless had one effort of note. This came in extra-time when he went on a run towards the inside-left edge of the area and received a pass back from Hurtado, before toe-poking a low strike that Mele parried low for a corner.

Lastly, though there were some shaky moments for Venezuela’s defence – committed most notably by both Ferraresi and Mejías – who was playing his first tournament game due to a suspension) – to only concede once in 120 minutes certainly can’t be sniffed at. They have now let in just two goals in the entire competition and, as all observers know, will provide a stern test in Sunday’s Final for England, who themselves have only conceded three goals in their six games. Who really knows how this monumental encounter will go? Venezuela will surely be experiencing some fatigue, having played 120 minutes in their three preceding games – England, by contrast, have concluded business each time within 90 minutes – but, as they have demonstrated in the past two-and-a-half weeks, anything really is possible.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on these two South American sides as they get set to play their final games of somewhat varying significance on the last day of South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Venezuela 2-1 USA (AET) (Quarter-final, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 4 June 2017)

Like Venezuela’s preceding encounter, their Quarter-final clash with the USA at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup took 120 minutes to decide, but ultimately Rafael Dudamel’s breathtaking men got what they deserved. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

venezuelausa

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Venezuela 2-1 USA (AET)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Quarter-final, 4 June 2017 (YouTube)

Though it took them in excess of 90 minutes, Venezuela’s dominance eventually paid off as they sensationally carried their history-making mission into the Semi-finals.

The chances La Mini-Vinotinto created are too innumerable to recall in full, yet as each minute passed with the scoresheet still blank it looked as if it could end up being one of those days. Indeed, within the first minute, they came close from a Nahuel Ferraresi header and also in this half both Adalberto Peñaranda and Sergio Córdova had chances, with the latter actually thinking he had scored in the 21st minute. Alas, his strike was belatedly ruled out for offside.

Just three minutes into the second half, Ronaldo Lucena’s corner was greeted by the head of Ronaldo Chacón though, unfortunately for him, his powerful effort rattled the crossbar. Lucena was to put in more than a few dangerous balls and another of these, in the 61st minute was headed by Córdova, yet again, this rebounded off the bar. Córdova, the tournament’s joint-top scorer with four goals, was to have more – some, rather gilt-edged – opportunities to score in both regulation- as well as extra-time, yet ultimately departed the field without having added to his tally.

Amongst others, Peñaranda also failed to convert a couple of opportunities – one, a particularly galling miss – yet, at the very end of the 90 minutes, both he and Córdova only narrowly avoided going home with guilty consciences. Indeed, at the death, USA had a clear chance to steal the victory yet, despite beating Wuilker Fariñez to a chipped ball from the left, Erik Palmer-Brown’s header went agonisingly wide.

Thus, for the second Venezuela game in a row, a further 30 minutes were required. Having looked destined to squander every chance that they could conjure, even they must have been a little surprised when Peñaranda opened the scoring just six minutes into the first additional half, sliding home substitute Samuel Sosa’s left-sided cross. Later, with just five minutes remaining, their lead was doubled when Ferraresi rose high to head home Lucena’s corner. Game over – or so it seemed. Indeed, barely two minutes later, partly capitalising on some Venezuelan joy-infused slackness, the USA pulled a goal back when Jeremy Ebobisse headed in a Brooks Lennon free-kick.

Nevertheless, though there was a nervy end to the game, Rafael Dudamel’s men could breathe a sigh of relief at the final whistle, which was swiftly followed by some elated celebrations of their astounding achievement of reaching the final four of the greatest competition for their age group.

Talent Tracking
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Thankfully, someone broke the deadlock and, perhaps fittingly, it was to be Venezuela’s best attacker of the tournament, Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford), who did the honours.

Previously, he had been involved in several notable attacks, such as in the 13th minute when his low right-footed shot was parried out wide. Then, in the 24th minute, he played a fine pass to Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas Atlético) whose left-footed shot went only just wide of the post. Later on in the 73rd minute, he had a golden opportunity to score when, from an acute angle within the area, he fired a ball into the goalmouth, where it took three pinball-esque ricochets before returning to him in a promising position with the goalkeeper floored. However, instead of allowing for some composure to lead him through the situation, he instinctively swung his left boot at the ball and was to somehow watch his shot evade the gaping net.

Two minutes from regulation time, he almost had another good chance when Yangel Herrera (No. 8, New York City FC, on loan from Manchester City) played one of several incisive through-balls from largely deep positions that he was to distribute throughout the game. The captain was again to have an impressive game, also helping to ensure that the back four had very little to do over the 120 minutes. Regarding this particular pass, however, almost as soon as it found Peñaranda, a defender was close enough to be able to quickly block the shot.

Nevertheless, the Málaga loanee was not to be denied and, six minutes into extra-time, he side-footed a good left-sided cross from Samuel Sosa (No. 15, Deportivo Táchira) into the back of the net, thus scoring his second goal of the tournament.

Had Peñaranda not scored, one wonders if Venezuela would have made the breakthrough as frustrations were mounting with every miss from their many opportunities – not least following those that fell to Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC). Indeed, he did manage to get the ball in the back of the net after 21 minutes with a low strike, though this was ruled out for offside and. subsequently, the four-goal striker’s composure was to repeatedly desert him as on another day he could have easily bagged a hat-trick.

It was in the second half, in particular, that his crimes in front of the opposition goal were committed. Firstly, in the 54th minute he had a virtually free header in the centre yet glanced it wide. Seven minutes later, he was slid through following a great pass by Herrera, yet despite being practically one-on-one with goalkeeper Jonathan Klinsmann, his low shot lacked placement and was comfortably blocked. A couple of minutes later, he was perhaps unfortunate when he rose well to head powerfully against the crossbar. Then, almost immediately afterwards in the 64th minute, Córdova fashioned a chance of his own from the inside-right edge of the area, curling a left-footed effort a couple of yards wide of the far post.

So many opportunities in what was barely ten minutes of action garnered him some unwanted attention and judgements. Much later on in the first minute of extra-time, he was to have another good chance when Herrera’s superb ball from deep was controlled by the forward yet, before he could pull the trigger, Klinsmann was there to nab the ball off him. Lastly, soon after Peñaranda gave Venezuela the lead, the scorer nearly turned provider when he dinked a fine central ball which put Córdova one-on-one yet, frustratingly, he nudged the ball far too gently at the goalkeeper, with his shot also lacking direction.

Had he put a couple of these opportunities away – the 54th-minute free header and the 61st-minute nod against the bar – Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC), in particular, would have been a satisfied man as he set them up. The ever-impressive midfielder with his lofted balls could well have had even more assists to his name. Indeed, it was he who also crossed into the area in the 48th minute for Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC) to batter the bar with a header. Lucena’s crosses were a threat from the off, with one that drew a fine save from Klinsmann coming after less than minute. The man who headed this was centre-back Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira) and, some 114 minutes later, he was to ensure that Lucena was not to be denied his assist when he towered high from his team-mate’s pinpoint corner to nod home Venezuela’s second goal.

Overall, though they somewhat sloppily conceded their first goal some 507 minutes into the tournament, this was an otherwise impressive performance from Venezuela, even if they could have been a considerable bit more clinical. Though the USA did not offer much going forward, the defence nevertheless did well not to allow the four-goal Josh Sargent a sniff. However, owing to an accumulation of yellow cards, two of their number will unfortunately be suspended for the Semi-final: the impressive centre-back Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas, soon-to-be Udinese, on loan from Watford) as well as left-back José Hernández (No. 5, Caracas FC). That said, Dudamel does possess two back-up players with more than enough experience – particularly in qualifying – to suggest that they possess the abilities to do effective jobs within this rather well-drilled system.

Uruguay, their opponents in the South American battle on Thursday 8 June 2017, will certainly provide a stern. However, given all that Venezuela have achieved as well as the knowledge that they were the only side to defeat the CONMEBOL champions in qualifying, they have every right to believe that they stand a strong chance of making the Final. Now, wouldn’t that really be something?

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the two remaining South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

Venezuela 1-0 Japan (AET) (Round of 16, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 30 May 2017)

Venezuela’s Round of 16 clash with Japan at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup took 120 minutes to decide but ultimately Rafael Dudamel’s heroic charges emerged victorious. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

venezuelahapanresult

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Venezuela 1-0 Japan (AET)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Round of 16, 30 May 2017 (YouTube)

After negotiating their way through an additional thirty minutes of play, Rafael Dudamel’s men were finally able to make history by becoming the first ever Venezuelan side to reach the Quarter-finals of the Under-20 World Cup.

It was an often tense encounter, in which the burgundy boys were put under more pressure than in any of their preceding games. Indeed, despite having a respectable share of the ball in the opening exchanges, towards the end of the first half, it was Japan who started to edge proceedings. They nearly found the back of Wuilker Fariñez’s cobweb-filled net in the 29th minute when Ritsu Doan curled a fine free-kick over the wall, which crashed off the crossbar, rebounding for Yuto Iwasaki to screw a shot wide of the post.

Venezuela’s hitherto steely defence was rattled by moments such as this and their Asian opponents were to continue to look the likelier to score for at least the first quarter-hour of the second half. However, as the game wore on, despite the South Americans making no changes in regulation time – by contrast, Japan had made all three of theirs by the 76th minute – they appeared more intent on winning the game without resorting to penalties. Yeferson Soteldo and, in particular, Adalberto Peñaranda, began to cause more problems with their jinking runs yet when the 90 minutes were over, the game was still deadlocked at 0-0.

The first half of extra-time was a little cagey with Venezuela nevertheless maintaining the the upper hand, though when Peñaranda was withdrawn after 97 minutes one could be forgiven for thinking that spot-kicks were inevitable. However, from a Ronaldo Lucena corner in the 108th minute, captain Yangel Herrera was the man to strike a blow against fatalistic thoughts as he powerfully headed home to send his compatriots into raptures. Subsequently, Venezuela were able to see out this euphoric, record-breaking win and thus take another almighty leap in their increasingly plausible quest to transform from dark horses into genuine contenders for the tournament outright.

Talent Tracking

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Owing to Japan’s neat, quick-paced, passing moves, goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) had to be on much higher alert than he was in any of his previous outings. Admittedly, he was somewhat fortunate not to lose his 100 per cent clean sheet record from Ritsu Doan’s 29th-minute free-kick against the crossbar which had him beat. However, just before this he had done well to anticipate a through-ball and clear before the opponent reached it and, later on in the 57th minute, he pulled off his best save of the tournament when, following a lovely Doan pass to Akito Takagi, he solidly blocked the latter’s low effort. When a penalty shootout appeared to be looming, it looked as if there was a chance that Fariñez would grab the headlines as both converter and stopper. Instead, however, the highly-rated youngster will just have to settle for the recognition that this was undoubtedly the most impressive of his four World Cup performances so far.

Good as Fariñez was though, in both this competition as well as qualifying, he’s rarely, if ever, had his goal bombarded by opponents and for this, he owes a debt of gratitude to the outfield rearguard. Indeed, much credit for the incredible 390 minutes Venezuela have gone without conceding a goal should go to the most consistent members of the back four. Namely, these would be right-back Ronald Hernández (No. 20, Zamora FC), who cleared danger effectively, made a notable recovery challenge and also caused some discomfort going forward, as well as the centre-back pairing of Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas, soon-to-be Udinese, on loan from Watford) and Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira). Whilst they faced their most difficult test yet in the form of the roaming playmaker Doan, these two men did well in largely repelling what was thrown at them. Furthermore, having replaced Eduin Quero (No. 3, Deportivo Táchira) at left-back for the second consecutive game, José Hernández (No. 5, Caracas FC) can also feel pleased with himself. So too can coach Dudamel, whose admirable system appears to maintain its organisation despite at least two notable changes in its personnel being made since the qualifying stage.

On a related note, the two chaps in front of the defence once again earned plaudits for their support in halting opposition forays. From an attacking perspective, both were also to play crucial roles, with Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) again a regular threat from set-pieces. One of his more notable chipped efforts into the area within regulation time fell to Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas Atlético) in the 76th minute and, even if play was ultimately called back, the latter did force a solid goalkeeping block with his powerful strike. However, of course, Lucena’s most vital contribution occurred in the 108th minute, soon after one of his corners had been headed over from a very inviting position by a combination of Ferraresi and a defender. His subsequent inswinger reached the penalty spot and was brilliantly headed into the back of the net by his midfield partner-in-crime and all-round captain fantastic, Yangel Herrera (No. 8, New York City FC, on loan from Manchester City).

Before this goal, the likeliest outlet for a Venezuelan opener had seemed to be Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford). After just five minutes, he showed his brilliant capacity for dribbling as, from the left flank, he nutmegged one opponent and then bypassed another, before striking a low right-footed effort into the side-netting. A few more tricks were demonstrated throughout his 97 minutes on the field and he also caused some more discomfort amongst the Japanese defence in the 72nd minute when he hit a low cross-cum-shot across goal.

He had been played into this promising position by Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) who actually hit a similar ball into the goalmouth later on in the 98th minute. The dimunitive dribbler, who has thus far in the tournament been somewhat overshadowed by Peñaranda, nevertheless had a decent game, often maintaining good possession with his glue-smeared boots and looking to make things happen.

That said, clear efforts on target were few and far between in this contest, something which Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC) sought to rectify in the 68th minute when he hit a fine low strike from over 25 yards which the goalkeeper had to get down low to in order to parry out. Also, much earlier in the 19th minute, the tournament topscorer had another opportunity on goal, when he ran onto a through ball which he was able to nudge ahead of the goalkeeper, though this was nevertheless blocked.

Still, though the game wasn’t always pretty, the winning goal will certainly be a thing of beauty for bleary-eyed Venezuelans to marvel over during the upcoming days. Following these motivating and inspiring repeated viewings, expectations shall surely mount. Indeed, whilst a Quarter-final on Sunday 4 June 2017 against the winner of Thursday’s encounter between USA and New Zealand will certainly pose some challenges, it is currently hard for followers of La Vinotinto‘s youngsters to imagine who could conceivably stop them. After four wins and four clean sheets, who can blame them?

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the two remaining South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela 2-0 Germany (Group B, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 20 May 2017)

Venezuela’s opening Group B game of the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup saw them sensationally see off European heavyweights Germany. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSphericals armchair talent-tracking… 

groupb1

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results, fixtures and standings)

Venezuela 2-0 Germany

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group B, 20 May 2017 (YouTube)

Rafael Dudamel’s much-admired generation of youngsters kick-started South Korea 2017 in memorable, expectation-defying fashion, defeating Germany with a relative degree of comfort. Indeed, though Guido Streichsbier’s men arguably had the upper hand during the first half, their superiority was ever so slight and consisted of little more than having the likes of Philipp Ochs aim a few extra shots from range that either missed the target or were easily stopped.

Things soon changed decisively after the break. Indeed, barely had the second period began when Venezuela had crafted the hitherto best chance of the game, which was soon followed by the opening goal in the 51st minute, scored by Ronaldo Peña. He capitalised on some defensive uncertainty on the flank before confidently waltzing with the ball past goalkeeper Dominik Reimann. Just three minutes later, the lead was emphatically doubled by Sergio Córdova, who was played into a little space on the right side within the area, before firing home low into the back of the net. Subsequently, the Europeans evidently had the wind knocked out of their sails and, as a contest, the game somewhat petered out in the final half-hour or so.

Perhaps the most remarkable thing about this extraordinary result for Venezuela is that both the players as well as the fans know that they can in fact play much better than this. Therefore, if to some they didn’t already, then now especially, the possibilities for this crop of cracks suddenly seem limitless.

Talent Tracking

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Though the hordes of fastidious tactics bloggers may wish to disagree, to these eyes, the best compliment that could be paid to the defence that kept this clean sheet is that, well, they weren’t very prominent. Indeed, with the exception of maybe one centre-back foot that needed to be instinctively put in to stop the ball rolling towards the wrong feet for a sudden close-range opportunity, La Vinotinto were never seriously tested. There were no last-ditch challenges, no heroic recoveries after having given away possession in the final third, no goalmouth clearances and no goalkeeping acrobatics. There didn’t need to be – and not just because the opposition were somewhat lacking as an attacking threat. Though in the initial stages, there was some midfield carelessness that allowed the Germans to roam towards the edge of the area, generally the team as a whole – and, of course, the back four, in particular – maintained their focus, kept their vigilance and tracked their rivals, rarely granting them an inch in meaningful positions.

Regarding the outfield rearguard, 18-year-old Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira) was the one notable surprise on the team-sheet, as during qualifying it was the bench-dwelling Josua Mejías (No. 17, Carabobo FC) who formed one half of a much-admired centre-back partnership with Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas). However, the defensive record – the best in that tournament – that was achieved back then also involved a few personnel alterations necessitated largely by suspensions. Thus, it would appear that, not only did Ferraresi acquit himself well, but also that Dudamel has an impressive pool of defence-minded individuals at his disposal who are receptive to the system that has been instilled.

Furthermore in this area, left-back Eduin Quero (No. 3, Deportivo Táchira), who received two red cards in his six qualifying matches, also got booked here early on but did well to keep his cool and quell any trouble on his side. His colleague over on the right-flank, Ronald Hernández (No. 20, Zamora FC) was again the more adventurous of the pair, having Venezuela’s only real attempt on target in the first half, shooting from 25-30 yards out on the inside-right in the 24th minute, though his, admittedly ambitious, effort was comfortably saved. He did, however, also combine very well on the overlap on the right on the half-hour mark, with his nifty bit of skill ultimately leading to a lay-off to a certain individual in a good position inside the area who – to the surprise of few – skied the ball over.

This would be attacker and target man, Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas), who earned the ire of many fans during qualifying for his profligacy in front of goal. However, shortly after the interval, he rose to prominence, first receiving a pass from defensive-midfielder and captain Yangel Herrera (No. 8, New York City FC, on loan from Manchester City) and nudging the ball past a defender to give Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) a clear, albeit brief, sight of goal. His strike was blocked by the goalkeeper but four minutes later, the diminutive dribbler – who was to later grow in confidence, enjoying short bursts with the ball – played a role in the opening goal, forcing a defender into a poor backwards header over on the right flank. This was seized upon by Peña, who gave his compatriots the gift they could scarcely have ever dreamed of as he exhibited some fine footwork, first taking the ball past another defender, then the goalkeeper, before sliding into the empty net. Cue elation.

The man who had combined well with Hernández for Peña’s first-half opportunity was right-sided attacker Sergio Córdova (No. 23, Caracas FC) and, just a few minutes after the Las Palmas youngster made it 1-0, it was he who doubled the lead. He had also struck a minor opportunity off-target in the first half and his 54th-minute goal came about following some fine work by the left-sided Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford). The dynamic forward who played in the 2015 CONMEBOL tournament but not the 2017 edition, showed that he can slot into this side rather neatly indeed as he dribbled from the inside-left into the dee, before sliding the ball inside the area for Córdova. The Caracas FC man thus took one touch before firing home at the near post. Cue euphoria. Overall, he showed considerable determination and ability from his right flank, impressing many back home who, in one notable online poll, overwhelmingly voted him the man of the match.

Otherwise, as is custom, midfielder Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) sprayed some good passes and put in a few notable deliveries, the best coming after 14 minutes from a set-piece which centre-back Velásquez stretched for, but couldn’t quite connect with.

Ultimately, this was a performance to serve notice to the global footballing fraternity not yet up-to-speed with the very promising developments in Venezuela. It’s especially exciting given that all Vinotinto fans know there is much more to come from their fresh-faced representatives, not least highly-rated goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC), who was never seriously troubled today. Given the organisers’ generosity of allowing 16 of the 24 group teams to qualify through to the second round, it is hard not to feel as if Venezuela already have one foot in the knock-out stage.

In the other Group B game played today, Mexico nabbed a 3-2 win at the death against Vanuatu, who will be Venezuela’s next opponents on Tuesday 23 May 2017.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical