Tag Archives: Paolo Guerrero

Peru 0-0 Venezuela – Copa América 2019 Group A (15 June 2019)

Creditable if not a classic. Here, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto’s first Copa América 2019 game against Peru.

Copa América 2019 – Group A

Saturday 15 June 2019 – Arena do Grêmio, Porto Alegre

Peru 0-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Peru 0-0 Venezuela, Copa América Group A, 15 June 2019 (YouTube)

Venezuela Ride Their Luck To Hang On For A Valuable Point

In their group stage bow, Venezuela were reduced to ten men but VAR and goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez aided them to battle to a potentially crucial point.

Manager Rafael Dudamel fielded the same team that swept aside an under-strength USA, but here, against World Cup-level opposition, they were unable to combine with anything like the same verve. Perhaps it was the fear of the likely ramifications of losing, possibly it owed something to the stadium being less than one-quarter full, but whatever the cause, overall it was a rather lacklustre game.

The frequent stoppages didn’t help matters. The first of these came after seven minutes when Peru thought that they had taken the lead. Talismanic striker Paolo Guerrero was fouled by left-back Luis Mago on the right edge of the area and the resulting free-kick was swung into the danger zone. The cross was contested by Renato Tapia and Faríñez and the goalkeeper was left red-faced as he failed to collect it, with the ball instead bobbling to Christofer Gonzáles, who composed himself well to bounce a strike that ended up in the top corner of the net. However, after a four-minute wait, the goal was ruled out owing to an offside picked up by VAR. Nobody can argue with this decision, but they certainly can with the time it took to reach it as well as how this was factored into the amount of stoppage-time allocated. Indeed, given that several players were to later find themselves down on the deck for prolonged periods, then other than to save the organisers’ blushes, one can only wonder why the referee added on a mere four minutes at the end of the first half.

Still, Peru seemed to be in the ascendancy early on and could well have scored in the 15th minute when they broke up Mago’s side with Jefferson Farfán squaring the ball to Christian Cueva on the left edge of the area. However, despite the defenders being at sixes and sevens, the Santos attacker could only screw his strike wide of the target.

Not for the first time, Venezuela struggled to link up effectively with one another and it wasn’t until the 22nd minute that a chance of note was generated. On the left, Jhon Murillo received a diagonal ball from Jefferson Savarino and crossed into the area, with Yangel Herrera’s touch knocking it on to Salomón Rondón. The Premier League striker poked a point-blank effort goalwards but goalkeeper Pedro Gallese instinctively stuck his leg in the way to prevent a goal.

Five minutes later, Venezuela had another chance when, from an acute angle on the left, Savarino swung in a free-kick that Gallese punched away. Nevertheless, Peru soon re-asserted themselves and fashioned some half-chances: Luis Advíncula’s 32nd-minute low drive from the edge of the area that Faríñez collected at the second attempt and then a 37th-minute chest-and-strike from Guerrero which was hit with intent, albeit over the bar. Perhaps the Internacional forward was just warming up as in the 42nd minute he swung a powerful free-kick around the wall, forcing Faríñez to touch it out behind. From the resulting corner, the goalkeeper’s shaky start to the tournament continued as he weakly punched out the cross and was fortunate that, whilst he was in no-man’s-land, Tomás Rincón was covering the net and able to block Luis Abram’s goal-bound attempt.

All square at the break, the second half started a little brighter for Venezuela as Rondón’s 47th-minute free-kick just outside of the area was struck a yard or so wide.

This was a false dawn and some 15 minutes later when Farfán was granted space to head home, Los Incas thought that they had gained the lead. Again, however, Señor VAR intervened, this time to correctly adjudge that the ball was played offside before the cross even came in to the area.

Thus, another let-off for Venezuela who, courtesy of a Rondón flick five minutes later, suddenly found a hole in the Peruvian backline, but Murillo’s shot from a slight angle was aimed straight at Gallese.

Any hopes that Venezuela may just pull a crafty one on their opponents were largely put to bed in the 74th minute when Mago received his second yellow card for a badly-timed challenge. At this point, many Vinotinto fans’ memories were cast back to the 2015 Copa when fellow left-back Fernando Amorebieta also received his marching orders and a late Peru goal condemned Venezuela to a 1-0 defeat in a similarly crucial encounter.

However, it appears that Venezuela’s No. 1 is less prone to such fatalistic thoughts. Indeed, less than two minutes later he redeemed himself with a fantastic save. This came as Farfán’s effort was deflected to the back post where it looked as if it would be knocked home, yet the Millonarios goalkeeper was somehow able to anticipate the direction of the strike and claw it out from the goal line. Subsequently, the ball was played back into the goalmouth, forcing Faríñez to pull off another close-range save and then watch as the rebound was sliced against the post. As an aside, not that anyone involved was aware at the time, but these latter two attempts were from offside players.

This bout of goalmouth pinball was the biggest scare that the ten men were to face in the final 15 minutes, but not the only one: in the 81st minute, Faríñez was forced to parry wide Edison Flores’ strike from the edge of the area and two minutes later the goalkeeper breathed a sigh of relief as Farfán’s close-range header narrowly evaded the target.

Thus, overall Peru had the better of this 0-0 draw and for the majority of the second half Dudamel’s men, although never completely out of the game, struggled to really test Gallese’s gloves. Substitutes Yeferson Soteldo and Darwin Machís perhaps displayed some late attacking intent and creativity which may well influence the manager’s thinking ahead of Tuesday’s clash with Brazil, but he’ll know that they will need to do a lot better to trouble the hosts.

That said, even though Venezuela’s progression hopes are likely to be determined by the final game against Bolivia, this point, albeit gained in underwhelming circumstances, could undoubtedly prove invaluable to prolonging their stay.

To keep up-to-date with Venezuela’s Copa América campaign, please return to this website as well as follow @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

Peru (4-3-3): P. Gallese; L. Advíncula, C. Zambrano, L. Abram, M. Trauco; R. Tapia, C. Gonzáles (A. Carrillo, 88′), Y. Yotún (A. Polo, 66′); J. Farfán, P. Guerrero, C. Cueva (E. Flores, 46′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Rosales, J. Chancellor, M. Villanueva, L. Mago; J. Moreno (R. Hernández, 78′), Y. Herrera, T. Rincón; J. Savarino (D. Machís, 69′), J. Murillo (Y. Soteldo, 84′); S. Rondón.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela 2-2 Peru – CONMEBOL Qualification Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (23 March 2017)

At half-time, the thirteenth matchday of La Vinotinto’s 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign appeared to herald a rebirth; by full-time, it was just another chapter in a weary story. Here, Hispanospherical.com provides a full match report and some thoughts…

CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018

Thursday 23 March 2017 – Estadio Monumental de Maturín, Maturín, Monagas State

Venezuela 2-2 Peru

Video Highlights of Venezuela 2-2 Peru, CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018, 23 March 2017 (YouTube)

First Half Fantastic, Second Half Familiar for Fresh-Faced Venezuela

For the third time during their Russia 2018 qualifying campaign, Venezuela were pegged back to a draw after leading 2-0, thus stalling Rafael Dudamel’s attempts to revitalise his new-look bottom-dwelling nation. 

On what was a dangerous, rain-soaked pitch in Maturín, Peru came closest in the first quarter when Aldo Corzo’s powerful header from a corner was well-parried out by 19-year-old goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez. However, soon afterwards in the 24th minute, Venezuela took the lead. Rómulo Otero’s free-kick from the left was whipped in and headed onto the bar by a Peruvian defender, with the ball then bouncing kindly to Mikel Villanueva, who nodded home for his second international goal – both of which have come against Peru.

The hosts, playing in a 4-4-2 formation, often showed much intent to get forward, with the two strikers in particular finding themselves in promising positions. In the 32nd-minute, Salomón Rondón drove towards the area but instead of squaring it to Josef Martínez, he continued his run and was hustled off the ball by a defender, yet despite the West Brom man’s protests, no penalty was awarded. Three minutes later, his partner Martínez managed to get away from an opponent inside the area, before sliding it back to Jhon Murillo. However, though this ball bypassed the goalkeeper, there were a few defenders crowding the goalmouth and one of them did well to chest wide the Tondela winger’s side-footed strike for a corner.

However, in the 40th minute, Venezuela sensationally doubled their lead. Adding to a couple of similarly spectacular strikes earlier this year for his Brazilian side, Atlético Mineiro, Rómulo Otero phenomenally struck a swerving 35-40-yard free-kick which fizzed off goalkeeper Pedro Gallese’s gloves and into the net; perhaps the Peru no. 1 should have done better but it was also a very impressive hit. Five minutes later when the teams went in for the break, it looked as if Dudamel’s tweaking of the personnel and the system had ushered in the belated start of a new, more competitive, phase.

Yet, within the first minute of the restart, things began to sour. Peru pulled a goal back after Rolf Feltscher was easily beaten by Édison Flores on the flank; he, in turn, fed Christian Cueva who had plenty of space to pass it between the centre-backs to Benfica’s André Carrillo, who slid the ball past Fariñez.

Despite this, Venezuela were to have two very good opportunities to regain their two-goal lead before the hour-mark. Firstly, in the 49th minute, Murillo crossed in a dangerous low ball from the right yet Rondón couldn’t quite reach it with his slide. Then, five minutes later, the Premier League striker played into space Martínez, who then roamed towards the edge of the area; however, despite only having the goalkeeper to beat, the MLS top-scorer badly sliced his golden opportunity wide. Shortly afterwards, some attacking impetus was lost as he was replaced by youngster and fellow America resident, Yangel Herrera; post-match, it was revealed that Martínez had picked up an injury and will be reportedly out of action for ten days, thus missing Tuesday’s Chile clash.

However, it was to be Peru who took advantage of this increasingly open game. Familiar foe Paolo Guerrero provided the goal in the 64th minute when he beat the out-of-sorts Wilker Ángel to climb highest and head home Yoshimar Yotún’s corner. Eight minutes later, Guerrero was not far off taking Los Incas in front when a low cross fell invitingly, but he couldn’t quite locate the trigger, with Fariñez instead gratefully gathering.

Not long afterwards, the impressive Otero was replaced by 24-year-old Leganés attacker Darwin Machís, who was making his first Vinotinto appearance in over five years. Within two minutes, he took the ball past a defender on the left edge of the area before striking a hard low shot at the goalkeeper who, given the conditions, did well to hold onto it. However, this was soon eclipsed by a greater chance that fell to Rondón, who benefited from a ricochet yet, despite having a clear sight of goal, he horribly miscued his left-footed effort comfortably wide. Gasps of disbelief reigned around the rainy Estadio Monumental de Maturín; this was to be Venezuela’s last chance of note.

With six minutes remaining, Murillo made way for diminutive dribbler Yeferson Soteldo. With Herrera and Fariñez already on the pitch, this meant Dudamel had managed to field all three of the stand-out performers from the Under-20 side’s impressive Sudamericano Sub-20 tournament earlier this year. The manager appears to have many promising youngsters at his disposal, either still in their teens or early twenties; however, today was not the day for them to collectively flourish and announce themselves to a wider public.

After all, they very nearly ended up on the losing side when, in the 91st minute, Miguel Trauco’s cross was headed low inside the area by Raúl Ruidiaz. Yet to the evident relief of Fariñez and the apparent disbelief of Peru boss Ricardo Gareca, this went narrowly wide.

Thus, after a 2-0 lead was squandered, it ended all-square, just as it had done a year ago. Even though Villanueva scored, Venezuela’s new-look defence looked out-of-sorts, with the players gifting space and struggling to keep up with their opponents. Further upfield, Murillo and, in particular, Otero, caught the eye and provided some creative moments. Regarding the two strikers Martínez and Rondón, however, though they did demonstrate some nice link-up play and creativity of their own, their finishing left something to be desired.

With no Martínez, Venezuela will really need Rondón to be on his game when leading their attack against Chile, holding up the ball and providing relief for the defence. Given La Roja beat La Vinotinto 4-1 on Venezuelan soil a year ago, the back four will also especially be required to improve, in their case by demonstrating more alertness and mutual understanding.

Waiting for them in Santiago will be a Chile side who, having just lost to Argentina, are now outside of the top five positions and so really need to win. Venezuela famously knocked Chile out of the 2011 Copa América quarter-final, yet since then have lost all four subsequent encounters, scoring just once and conceding 14. Thus, those anticipating a Dudamel Revolution may wish to keep these wishful thoughts private for the time being.

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-4-2): W. Fariñez; A. González, W. Ángel, M. Villanueva, R. Feltscher; J. Murillo (Y. Soteldo, 84′), A. Guerra, T. Rincón, R. Otero (D. Machís, 73′); J. Martínez (Y. Herrera, 59′) & S. Rondón.

Peru (4-2-3-1): P. Gallese; A. Corzo, C. Ramos, A. Rodríguez, M. Trauco; Y. Yotún (S. Peña, 78′), R. Tapia (P. Aquino, 85′); A. Carrillo (R. Ruidíaz, 78′), C. Cueva, É. Flores; P. Guerrero.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Peru 2-2 Venezuela – CONMEBOL Qualification Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (24 March 2016)

The fifth matchday of La Vinotinto’s 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign yielded the first point for Noel Sanvicente’s men, yet this will be of little comfort to fans who were seconds away from celebrating a morale-boosting win. Here, Hispanospherical.com provides a match report and offers some thoughts on the game.

CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018

Thursday 24 March 2016 – Estadio Nacional de Lima, Lima

Peru 2-2 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Peru 2-2 Venezuela, CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018, 24 March 2016 (YouTube)

Ruidíaz Denies Venezuela at the Death 

Match Report

With the last touch of the game, Raúl Ruidíaz rescued a Peruvian point and ruined what was so close to being a history-making night for Venezuela. 

La Vinotinto had never won a World Cup qualifier away in Peru (previously managing a solitary draw) and thus, having led 2-0 on the hour, were just half an hour away from an unanticipated morale boost. Alas, ultimately they failed to survive the onslaught by mere seconds.

Viewed as a whole with a detachment rarely found in the South American stands, Noel Sanvicente’s underperforming men were perhaps fortunate to even get a point from this game. However, upon the full-time whistle in Lima, this is not an opinion that many away fans would want to hear, let alone be in accord with.

Indeed, not only were they on the back-foot for the majority of the final third of the match but also for the first quarter, when the hosts – backed up by the urges and instruments of an expectant home crowd –  repeatedly exploited an inexperienced Venezuelan back-line. In the opening exchanges, Peru found a lot of space both in the middle and and on the flanks of a Venezuelan defence which, Oswaldo Vizcarrondo aside, had less than a dozen caps between them pre-game.

The first genuine scare of note came in the eighth minute when a ball was dinked over from the left into the area that Jefferson Farfán only narrowly failed to make strong contact with, instead scuffing wide. Not long afterwards, a cross from roaming right-back Luis Advíncula found Claudio Pizarro in space, but the veteran striker’s header was comfortable for goalkeeper Alain Baroja. Holes continued to be found that necessitated last-ditch tackles and blocks but it was in the 24th minute that Peru really should have taken the lead. Here, an appalling clearance from Ángel Faría – playing instead of the suspended right-back Roberto Rosales – went straight to Farfán who immediately fed Paolo Guerrero in the area. However, despite the time and space he was afforded, he was unable to divert the ball either side of Baroja, who instead made an instinctive block.

Yet, though a Peruvian opener seemed on the cards, the Venezuelans surprisingly began to get a foothold into the game, creating a string of chances. In the 26th minute, a counter-attack was spearheaded by Josef Martinez, who fed strike-partner Salomón Rondón on the left who, in turn, returned a point-perfect cross that Martinez volleyed, causing a fine save from Pedro Gallese. Three minutes later, Rondón himself had an opportunity, seizing upon a forward ball on the inside-right and hitting a low strike across goal that Gallese padded away. Then, a minute later, a free-kick from the returning Rómulo Otero – who had struggled with a couple of previous attempts – dipped just before Gallese, causing the Juan Aurich goalkeeper to awkwardly parry the ball out.

Soon after, however, the breakthrough that less than ten minutes prior seemed improbable occurred. Málaga midfielder Juanpi, who was making a rare international start and is poised to be a fixture in the line-up for the foreseeable future, burst into the area and was rashly upended for a penalty. Otero thus stepped up and confidently dispatched the spot-kick.

The previously boisterous home fans fell silent and several minutes later their representatives nearly fell another goal behind. This time, Juanpi swung in a free-kick that the head of centre-back Wilker Ángel powerfully connected with, yet Gallese pulled off a sensational save, preventing what seemed like a certain goal.

Subsequently, the hosts struggled to regain their earlier dominance, a situation that continued into the first quarter of the second half. Barely a minute after the restart, the visitors could have had a second when another Juanpi free-kick curled towards Vizcarrondo and Mikel Villanueva in considerable space, yet a lack of communication and/or anticipation led to the ball missing the target. Ten minutes later, however, the latter did manage to double the lead. After Juanpi won a corner, he swung in another pin-point cross that his Málaga team-mate Villanueva, unmarked at the back post, thundered home on the volley.

Elation spread amongst the Venezuelan ranks on the pitch, in the stands and at home. Not just the first point of the campaign, but three of the blighters seemed very much on the table begging to be collected, requiring only some professional shepherding over the finish line. Easier said than done, of course, and it did not take long for Los Incas to ground their briefly stratospheric opponents back on planet earth. Indeed, having come close just a minute after Villanueva’s goal, they halved the deficit a minute after the hour-mark. A long ball was knocked into the air and then headed on by recent substitute Raúl Ruidíaz into the path of Guerrero who did well to take the ball into his stride and then strike home – though goalkeeper Baroja really should not have allowed the ball past him. Though the Flamengo forward rushed to pick the ball out of the net in order to force a quick restart this was in fact a landmark moment for him, as he became Peru’s undisputed all-time top goalscorer.

This goal really swung the momentum pendulum back into the hosts’ favour and for the remainder of the game they were to increase the pressure on the visitors to what ultimately proved to be unbearable levels. Vinotinto nerves were certainly rattled in the 68th minute, though not as much as their own crossbar, which Guerrero nearly pulverised with a bullet header from a corner. Manager Sanvicente could sense as much as anyone that the winds had decisively changed and so made a double substitution a couple of minutes later. Not only did he grant Adalberto Peñaranda his debut (replacing Martínez) but he also took off creative catalyst Juanpi in order for his replacement Alejandro Guerra to add some defensive grit and experience to the ranks. 12 minutes later, following ever more narrow squeaks and uncertainty, Venezuela’s other main attacking threat Otero was withdrawn to be replaced by holding midfielder – and debutant – Carlos Cermeño.

Sanvicente was evidently trying to preserve his side’s slim advantage and bring some much-neeed order and organisation to what was a rather open game – albeit one with the ball largely in the Venezuelan half. When, in the last minute of regulation time, Edison Flores was fed a return-ball inside the area yet from close range could only hoist the ball over both Baroja and the bar, many a Vinotinto fan must have felt an historic win was all-but-assured.

Alas, concentration levels failed at the very last hurdle. After some attacks were momentarily thwarted, mental lapses afforded space on the left for Flores who compensated for his miss by providing a pinpoint cross for Ruidíaz, who slipped away from Ángel, to nod home.

The goal was literally the last touch of the match. The dejection in the Venezuelan camp did well to mask the fact that this was the first – and somewhat unanticipated – point that they had picked up. If they can overcome the late psychological blow, then the home humiliation against Chile on Tuesday that some have feared may not come to fruition after all.

Match Thoughts

Future Optimism: Three Stand-Ins Amongst the Best Performers 

Venezuela came into the game without several individuals who have started recent qualifying games. Some of these players were either suspended (Roberto Rosales, Luis Manuel Seijas and Sema Velázquez), left out the squad (Ronald Vargas, Christian Santos and Gabriel Cichero) or, in the case of at least one, started on the bench (Alejandro Guerra).

Some players who stepped in for rare starts impressed and should expect many more caps in the foreseeable future. Of these, Juanpi, who has emerged to become a La Liga regular this season, perhaps put in the strongest performance. Not only did he win the penalty for the first goal and set up Villanueva for the second but, were it not for the heroics of Gallese and a slight-mix-up between his team-mates, he could well have had a hat-trick of assists to his name. This was the first time he has started a competitive international and it certainly will not be the last.

Rómulo Otero, another versatile attacking midfielder and impressive set-piece taker, also made his mark. The 23-year-old has gained more caps than Juanpi but has struggled for international appearances over the past two years due to injury. Against Peru, he made a welcome return to the line-up, coolly slotting home a penalty kick, driving at defenders and causing problems from set-pieces. With regard to free-kicks at least, many fans have hoped that he would be the long-term successor to Juan Arango though, as this match demonstrates, while future opportunities are certainly on the cards, he will have some stiff competition in this department from his Málaga-based team-mate.

Mikel Villanueva, who like Juanpi is registered with Málaga but instead plays for their reserve side Atletico Malagaugeno, also had a game to remember. This was his second appearance following last month’s friendly debut and he not only scored a memorable thumping goal but came away with more credit than most of his defensive colleagues. With Fernando Amorebieta having retired, Andrés Túñez falling out of favour and Gabriel Cichero all but a nowhere man at club level, an opportunity has surely opened up at left-back.

Problems at the Back

Unfortunately, not all players who stepped in can be assured of future appearances after this international break. Right-back Ángel Faría and centre-back Wilker Ángel both played their parts in the concession of goals and were often caught out of position, struggling to keep up with the pace of play. Against Chile, they will more than likely be dropped in favour of Roberto Rosales and Sema Velázquez, both of whom will be returning from suspensions.

Furthermore, though a first-team regular and one less likely to lose his place on Tuesday (UPDATE (29/3/16): If reports are to believed, it looks like he has in fact lost his place), goalkeeper Alain Baroja nevertheless really needs to raise his game. Once again, he showed moments of uncertainty and was at fault for a goal – this time when he awkwardly allowed a fairly straightforward shot from Guerrero to creep under his ineffectual dive. Add this to his amateurish mix-up with Vizcarrondo for Paraguay’s late winner in October and his dreadful clearance against Ecuador in November that led to their second goal and this gives the average Venezuela fan quite the unwanted memory bank to hold against him.

Martínez Enhanced a Team That Now Has More Reasons to Feel Cheerful 

More positively, Josef Martínez went some way to providing the answer for the striking dilemma of the decade: Who, If Anyone, Should Partner Salomón Rondón?  The West Brom striker has often looked more involved and participated in more direct moves when the younger, pacier, Torino forward has been playing a supplementary role. There were glimpses of this against Peru, particularly when the pair began Venezuela’s first-half re-emergence into proceedings as a fast-paced counter-attack led to the pair combining with Martínez ultimately only being denied by an impressive save. Unfortunately, as Rondón picked up his second booking of the campaign, they will not be reprising their partnership against Chile. Nevertheless, as things stand, if in future games Sanvicente opts to give Rondón some close on-field support, Martínez is surely currently ahead of the likes of Christian Santos, Richard Blanco and Adalberto Peñaranda in the pecking order.

Lastly, though in the immediate aftermath of this result nobody really wishes to hear this, the Venezuelan side, much of which was lacking in familiarity with one another, showed great character through most of the game. After 25 minutes, a defeat by at least two or three goals seemed likely and the thought that they could ever be two clear goals in front away to Peru could only have come from the mind of the most optimistic futurologist predicting a distant age at least a generation from now. To withstand the early tide and then play effectively within their limitations in order to gain their first point of the campaign represents progress. To follow this up with a strong showing against Chile at the ground of Sanvicente’s former club Zamora would do much for fan and team morale.

Team Selections

Peru (4-4-2): Gallese; Advíncula, Zambrano, Ascues, Vargas; Ballón, Tapia (Lobatón. 51′), Cuevas, Farfán (Flores, 60′); Pizarro (Ruidíaz, 60′), Guerrero.

Venezuela (4-4-2): Baroja; Faría, Ángel, Vizcarrondo, Villanueva; Juanpi (Guerra, 70′), Rincón, Figuera, Otero (Cermeño, 81′); S. Rondón, Martínez (Peñaranda, 70′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Peru 0-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (31 March 2015)

International Friendly

Tuesday 31 March 2015 – Lockhart Stadium, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

Peru 0-1 Venezuela

Match Highlights of Peru 0-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 31 March 2015 (Courtesy of YouTube user Claudio Navarro Vargas)

La Vinotinto Bounce Back as Starlet Martínez Restores Optimism

Team Selections

Peru (4-2-3-1): Gallese; Advíncula, Zambrano, Ramos, Céspedes; Ballón, Tapia; Carrillo (Benavente, 71′), Deza (Cueva, 30′), Hurtado (Gonzáles, 84′); Ávila (Ruidíaz, 71′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): Baroja; Rosales, Vizcarrondo, Túñez, Amorebieta; Rincón, Seijas (Lucena, 68′); Guerra (A. González, 90+2′), Martínez (Arango, 64′), C. González (Vargas, 78′); S. Rondón (M. Rondón, 90+3′).

Match Report

In what was an open and often fiercely contested international, Torino forward Josef Martínez’s strike on the hour-mark was enough to give La Vinotinto a morale-boosting win against their Copa América Group C rivals. 

As Brazil and Colombia are also in this group, the encounter on 18 June between these two nations may prove decisive in determining whether either can qualify for the knock-out stage as one of the two best-peforming third-placed sides. Venezuela, having just four days prior been defeated by Jamaica – another side with marginal hopes of reaching the second phase of this competition – will be pleased, not to mention relieved, to have gone some way to getting back on track with this victory. Had they not, the pessimism that has occasionally been expressed in the national media in the first eight months of Noel Sanvicente’s reign possibly would have permeated throughout the squad before a Copa ball had even been kicked.

This Vinotinto performance, though far from flawless, was nevertheless an improvement, with the side linking up more effectively in attacking positions, creating far more chances and conceding less ground in defensive areas. The more frequent forward forays can partly be attributed to three changes, namely the use of Luis Manuel Seijas as a deep-lying playmaker and, more significantly further upfield, Alejandro Guerra and Josef Martínez – both of whom had provided rare offensive optimism after they came on at half-time against Jamaica.

Here at the Lockhart Stadium – home to NASL’s Fort Lauderdale Strikers, whose pitch is evidently also used for American Football games – this attacking prowess was to be mostly demonstrated in the second half, with the first being a more even, albeit spirited, affair.

Indeed, Venezuela – in their blindingly luminous new away kit – began promisingly, with Martínez gaining some space on the inside-right within the first minute, though perhaps twisted one too many times in the area, thus allowing the defender to recover and block out any potential shot. Ten minutes later, the Serie A striker was to link up with Atlético Nacional’s Guerra on the inside-right, gaining space and putting in a low cross that rolled into space but was nevertheless dealt with. It was to be the Colombia-based Guerra who created La Vinotinto‘s best chance of the half when, on 26 minutes, he dinked in a ball from the right byline that went over goalkeeper Pedro Gallese but just evaded the agonising stretch of Zenit forward Salomón Rondón at the back post.

However, it was not to be all one-way traffic, with the Peruvians – who were missing top exports such as Paolo Guerrero, Jefferson Farfán, Claudio Pizarro and Juan Manuel Vargas – also exploiting space on the right in what was a rather even half. With what proved to be the only real efforts on goal in this period, both of Peru’s best chances came around the midway point and each fell to Jean Deza, currently plying his trade with Alianza Lima on loan from Ligue 1 outfit Montpellier. First, on 21 minutes, Luis Advíncula nudged the ball though to Deza in a central position and he gained some space before hitting a deflected shot that was comfortable for Alain Baroja. Six minutes later, the Caracas FC goalkeeper was again not to have too much trouble saving another effort that went into his arms from the edge of the area from Deza. Unfortunately for the Peruvian, despite looking like his side’s most likely scorer, this was to be his last contribution to the game as he was hurt by an incoming challenge and had to be withdrawn.

Though the first half was rather open and contested with a spirit that was refreshing for a friendly – possibly influenced by the buoyant expatriates in the crowd – this was to be turned up an extra notch or two after the interval, with both sides having more chances to score. Adherents to certain psychological methods may feel Venezuela coach Sanvicente helped to precipitate this by sending his charges out a few minutes before Los Incas. If so, it was to pay nearly instant dividends when a free-kick from a deep position was lofted into the area, then headed across by Oswaldo Vizcarrondo to Salomón Rondón who, under some defensive pressure, leant back slightly to scoop an attempt just over. On another day, he may well have been able to wrestle himself into some space before getting a snap-shot away.

Ten minutes into the new half, it was looking as if the game may boil over with three players – André Carrillo, Roberto Rosales and Josef Martínez – receiving yellow cards in quick succession, bringing the total number of players on a yellow card up to five. However, while the scrapes and skirmishes did not halt at this point, the cards did, with instead the real action – and what proved to be the pivotal moment – occurring soon afterwards.

Indeed, just before the hour-mark, the Peruvians were to suddenly gain some space on right, with a subsequent cross put into the area where it was met by Sporting Cristal marksman Irven Ávila. However, despite being in acres of room and being granted an age to direct his header, he could only nod it against the ground for it to clip off the top of the bar and over. The fact that the offside flag had gone up did little to spare his blushes.

However, little time was available to dwell on his poor finishing as immediately from Baroja’s pumped upfield clearance, Salomón Rondón flicked on the ball with Martínez taking it into his stride before unleashing a clinical right-footed shot from inside the area past Gallese. The versatile Torino forward, still a mere 21 years old, had given Venezuela the breakthrough. Yet, in a move that may have been planned before the goal, this highly promising starlet was almost immediately replaced by the undisputed icon of the past decade, Juan Arango.

Several minutes later it looked as if Sanvicente was looking to preserve this lead rather than extend it, as he took off Seijas, the attack-minded deep-lying playmaker, and replaced him with the more reserved, holding midfielder, Franklin Lucena. Yet if this was this intention, it was certainly not how the remaining 22 minutes panned out.

Indeed, La Vinotinto were to have several strong opportunities to increase the score as the Peruvians increasingly conceded possession and space. In the 76th minute, Arango burst forward slightly to the right-of-centre 30 yards out but, with only one defender separating him and Rondón, his pass went slightly askew, forcing the Zenit man into a wide position from where he could only win a corner. A couple of minutes later, Rondón attempted to turn provider when a poor clearance was rapidly headed into his path on the right, which he quickly released into the area but his intended target, César González, was in a difficult position and was unable to direct it goalwards. Another two minutes passed and Rondón again nearly set up a goal as he flicked on a ball centrally for Arango who, just inside the area, momentarily had a clear sight of goal, but a defender was ultimately to catch up and put him off making a meaningful connection with the ball.

Three minutes after this Arango was to have another, arguably better, chance to score as a cross sprayed from the right by Guerra drifted over two players tangling in the centre all the way to the Xolos de Tijuana man on the left of the area. Blessed with considerable time to shape up and shoot with only a defender’s desperate lunge separating him and the goalkeeper, he nevertheless dragged his shot wide of the far post.

With just three minutes remaining, Arango nearly managed to go some way towards making up for these wasted opportunities when, from the left inside the area, he slid the ball through to Guerra. Yet, from a mere seven yards out, ‘El Lobo’ was to sidefoot a very presentable opportunity straight at the chest of Gallese who managed to parry it out.

From then on, in stoppage-time Venezuela were to have one final opportunity to extend the lead. Following some rapid – and, in contrast to the majority of previous games, effective – short passing play, substitute Ronald Vargas curled in a fine cross from the left that Rondón ran onto but, perhaps due to a slight mis-timing of his run, headed over from just outside the six-yard box.

Though Venezuela had all these chances to record a more impressive victory, they could have also conceded on more than one occasion. Indeed, while the Peruvians were ultimately second-best in this half, they did continue to threaten, having a couple of penalty shouts turned down as well as, in addition to Ávila’s header against the bar, two opportunities that on another day could well have gone in. The most notable of the two came on 82 minutes when Paços de Ferreira’s Paolo Hurtado played an exquisite return pass to Alianza Lima’s Christian Cueva who, from eight yards out, volleyed a strike that seemed destined to go in but which Baroja did very well to parry out wide. This was a close shave, as was, more literally, Christofer Gonzáles’s shot a few minutes later. The Universitario substitute played a quick one-two from a free-kick then, 35 yards out, hit a fine effort that dipped only marginally over the crossbar.

Ultimately, La Vinotinto were to hold on, attaining what many will feel was the country’s first real victory under manager Noel Sanvicente, due to the other two against Honduras being in games contested solely by home-based players. While nobody should be getting too carried away given that the opposition were not at full strength and were experimenting in Ricardo Gareca’s first game in charge, it was nevertheless a boost following the dispiriting performance against Jamaica.

Quite where this all leaves the hopes of some of the players not entirely sure of their ticket to Chile in June is another matter, but several things taken from these two friendly matches can nevertheless be asserted. For some reflections on the Jamaica and Peru games, click here.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical