Tag Archives: Qatar 2022

Brazil 1-0 Venezuela — Conmebol Qualification Stage for Fifa World Cup 2022 (13 November 2022)

Just because you knew it was going to happen doesn’t make it any less dispiriting.

Conmebol Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2022

Friday 13 November 2022 — Estádio do Morumbi, São Paulo

Brazil 1-0 Venezuela

Venezuela Sunk in São Paulo

A second-half Roberto Firmino strike undid José Peseiro’s otherwise resilient side, who are still pointless and goalless after their opening three qualifiers.

Until the Liverpool forward’s 67th-minute goal it did look like Venezuela might just frustrate Tite’s men as they did at last year’s Copa América. There were plenty of echoes of that 0-0 draw, particularly Brazil again having efforts chalked off by the officials.

This time they had two disallowed goals, with the first coming in the seventh minute: left-back Renan Lodi’s cross-shot was parried by goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez, with Richarlison then knocking in the rebound. However, Lodi was adjudged to have been offside when the diagonal ball was played his way.

Over half an hour later, the impressive Lodi whipped in a fine cross that Gabriel Jesus knocked into the centre for Richarlison. The Everton striker’s attempt was blocked at point-blank range by Faríñez, but Douglas Luiz was there to hit home the loose ball. This time, however, a foul in the danger zone let Venezuela off the hook.

The first half largely consisted of Brazil attempting to find ways through. Some further shots were saved low and the hosts were especially close to scoring when the goal was gaping for Richarlison following Jesus’s knock-back, but his agonising stretch could only direct the ball wide.

As for Venezuela, they were very much on the back foot throughout the opening period and did not make their attacking presence known until the 39th minute. Here, Yeferson Soteldo, justifying his selection, found space to jink past Danilo, before hitting in a low cross. This evidently took goalkeeper Ederson by surprise, who will have been grateful that Marquinhos was there in the six-yard-box to divert the ball away from Salomón Rondón.

The second half was barely six minutes old when Brazil were again denied by the officials — this time a VAR check on an alleged handball in the area by Venezuelan defender Wilker Ángel ultimately ruled in favour of the visitors.

Subsequently, the Seleção continued to enjoy the lion’s share of possession, albeit without really threatening. That is, until Firmino pounced. His match-winner came after Darwin Machís was pressured into directing Éverton Ribeiro’s cross towards his own goal and the Liverpool man was on hand to gratefully accept the gift.

The rest of the game will not live long in the memory, but there was one incident that could have some serious repercussions: captain Tomás Rincón picked up a booking and is now ruled out of La Vinotinto‘s home clash against Chile.

Although Peseiro will be able to replace him with the returning Yangel Herrera, it’s nevertheless a blow. Furthermore, with full-backs Roberto Rosales and Rolf Feltscher sustaining injuries and having to be withdrawn, Venezuela’s rearguard could really struggle in Caracas.

Post-game, Peseiro said that as he is pressed for time to implement anything more daring, he is likely to persist with the defensive 4-3-2-1 formation for the time being. It may not be easy on the eye, but it has yielded results for the players in the past under the previous regime.

On Tuesday, Venezuela will have their work cut out to keep their first clean sheet of the campaign against a nation they conceded seven goals against in their last two qualifying encounters. Even if they manage this, they’ll need something a little extra if they want to convince the country and the continent that they are viable contenders for a place at Qatar 2022.

Team Selections

Brazil (4-3-3): Ederson; Danilo, Marquinhos, T. Silva, R. Lodi (A. Telles, 90+6′); É. Ribeiro, Allan, D. Luiz (L. Paquetá, 46′); G. Jesus (Éverton, 76′), Richarlison (Pedro, 76′), R. Firmino.

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Faríñez; R. Rosales (A. González, 65′), Y. Osorio, W. Ángel, R. Feltscher (L. Mago, 18′); T. Rincón, J. Moreno, C. Cásseres Jr; D. Machís (J. Savarino, 79′), Y. Soteldo (R. Otero, 65′); S. Rondón.

Darren

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Conmebol Qualifying Campaign for Fifa World Cup 2022 — October 2020 Preview

We all know things are far from what they could be and how we’ve landed in this situation. No doubt you’ve all got far more important things to worry about and it’s certainly understandable if you’ve lost interest. Nevertheless, some ambitious folk have been summoned to dream on a global scale — let’s hope we can all be able to do the same sooner rather than later.

Conmebol Qualifiers for FIFA World Cup 2022

Friday 9 October 2020 — Estadio Metropolitano Roberto Meléndez, Barranquilla.

Colombia vs Venezuela

Tuesday 13 October 2020 — Estadio Metropolitano de Mérida, Mérida.

Venezuela vs Paraguay

Image

“This game is not between Peseiro and Queiroz; it is between Venezuela and Colombia” — tell that to this blogger, José.

Quote from AS; image from Marca.

Come On Then, If We Must

In common with all other Conmebol nations, Venezuela belatedly begin their Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign after nearly 11 months of inaction.

Such a lengthy gap between matches is certainly not without precedent for La Vinotinto; after all, it was only two years ago that they returned from a 10-month hiatus to face the same country that they will first encounter this time around: neighbours Colombia. They’re also definitely not strangers to shambolic preparations, which, given all the hurdles the c-word has thrown at them in the run-up, is just as well.

Still, pity the new manager.

New manager? Ah yes, a bit of background may be in order: Rafael Dudamel, the man who led the under-20 side to second place at the 2017 World Cup, finally had enough. No more federation politics and restrictions to navigate for him, as he was instead lured away at the turn of the year by Brazilian giants Atlético Mineiro. There, he lasted less than two months, getting the boot after prematurely exiting the Copa Sudamericana and the Copa do Brasil. He was then promptly replaced at Mineirão by former Argentina, Chile and Sevilla boss Jorge Sampaoli, which brings us back to Dudamel’s successor at international level.

Well, it’s not Sampaoli, is it? No, but in early February many fans thought it was going to be as talks were reported to have reached a very advanced stage. In a swift and hazy turn of events, however, José Peseiro was instead announced as the new man at the Venezuela helm. Despite the Portuguese 60-year-old having previously managed the likes of Sporting Clube de Portugal and Porto, it would be fair to say his reception was underwhelming, with many confessing to have never heard of him. Perhaps they could be forgiven, as not only has he struggled to pick up much silverware but also in recent years he has rarely stayed anywhere long enough to be remembered: his last six appointments have each lasted a mere matter of months. This does not bode well for the long-term project he has landed himself, even if the pandemic has already allowed him to boost his longevity credentials.

Despite these reservations, maybe he’ll be able to command a greater level of authority within the dressing room, owing in part to having trained players of the highest calibre. Indeed, in a curious — he may prefer the word “irrelevant” — subplot, not only has he led top teams within his homeland, but during the 2003/04 season he was also the assistant manager at Galácticos-era Real Madrid. Who was he second in command to? Oh, only his compatriot and current Colombia coach, Carlos Queiroz.

Although many of the Venezuelan players may have also scratched their heads upon his appointment, he’s certainly had plenty of time to familiarise himself with them: pre-lockdown he got Josef Martínez back on board, embarked on a tour to meet various talents and then named a 40-man preliminary squad in March for the qualifiers that we’re now catching up with. Since then, he’s been in touch with many of the chaps and has no doubt watched countless videos. Despite this, he hasn’t had much time with them on the training ground, so he’s not expected to implement any radically new tactical schemes just yet.

Of the 29 players he has in his squad, all of them play their club football outside of their homeland — this is probably for the best, not least because the domestic league has yet to restart (scheduled return date: 14 October). Even so, although it is a strong crop, Peseiro will have to contend without several key individuals: talismanic striker Salomón Rondón and midfielder Júnior Moreno have both been prevented from joining up by their clubs and the country’s most high-profile defender, Parma new-boy Yordan Osorio, is also missing.

Facilitated by this latter absence, a starting position at centre-back had been on the cards for Mikel Villanueva (who has been enjoying a new lease of life in the Portuguese top flight), but injury the day before the opener has ruled him out. It’s too early to say whether he’ll recover in time to face Paraguay. Yeferson Soteldo and Fernando Aristeguieta are also currently in Colombia and had reportedly been part of Peseiro’s plan A, but their respective difficulties entering the country mean they are unlikely to be kicking off in Barranquilla.

With Aristeguieta probably exhausted, Rondón virtually incarcerated in a Chinese hotel and Josef Martínez nursing a long-term injury, it is set to be a big moment for Germany-based Sergio Córdova, who has been used as the sole striker in training.

Since this time last year, over half of the players in this squad have moved clubs. Goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez is one, having joined newly promoted Ligue 1 side Lens. However, as he has yet to play, there have been some calls to instead give the No. 1 shirt to his fellow U20 World Cup teammate Joel Graterol, who has been chalking up league and Libertadores appearances at Colombian side América de Cali. That said, for now at least, it’s still Faríñez who will be between the sticks.

Another player who has embarked on a new club life in 2020 is Jefferson Savarino, having been snapped up by Atlético Mineiro during Dudamel’s brief tenure; the attacking midfielder’s since put in some good performances and has won the state championships.

He is predicted to start behind Córdova in the line of three alongside Jhon Murillo and Darwin Machís. Regarding the latter, he and his Granada teammate Yangel Herrera (who is set to be in a holding midfield duo with captain Tomás Rincón) are arguably their nation’s top-performing players at the moment, having finished seventh in La Liga last season and recently qualified for the group stage of the Europa League.

Elsewhere, there are also some fresh faces in the squad, such as three of the four-man MLS contingent who will be hoping for their first caps, but the likely line-up is, once all caveats have been taken into account, very familiar. According to a reliable source, Peseiro will set up his men in a 4-2-3-1:

W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, W. Ángel, J. Chancellor, R. Rosales; T. Rincón, Y. Herrera; J. Murillo, J. Savarino, D. Machís; S. Córdova.

Venezuela haven’t actually beaten Colombia for five years, but when they do play them, the result is usually close. As for Paraguay, the last time the two nations squared off was a memorable encounter three years ago on the final matchday of the last qualifying campaign: a goal by 19-year-old Yangel Herrera in Asunción simultaneously ended the hosts’ dreams, while allowing the youthful visitors to envisage a much more prosperous future.

The circumstances may not be ideal, but the time has come for them to start delivering on their promise.

Venezuela Squad

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Lens, France, on loan from Millonarios, Colombia), Alain Baroja (Delfín, Ecuador) & Joel Graterol (América de Cali, Colombia).

Defenders

Roberto Rosales (Leganés, Spain), Alexander González (Dinamo București, Romania), Mikel Villanueva (Santa Clara, Portugal), Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), Jhon Chancellor (Brescia, Italy), Ronald Hernández (Aberdeen, Scotland), Luis Mago (Universidad de Chile, Chile) & Miguel Navarro (Chicago Fire, USA).

Midfielders

Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Rómulo Otero (Corinthians, Brazil, on loan from Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Darwin Machís (Granada, Spain), Juan Pablo Añor (No club, recently released by Málaga, Spain), Yangel Herrera (Granada, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil), Jefferson Savarino (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Bernaldo Manzano (Atlético Bucaramanga, Colombia, on loan from Deportivo Lara, Venezuela), Eduard Bello (Antofagasta, Chile), Cristian Cásseres Jr. (New York Red Bulls, USA), Arquímedes Figuera (César Vallejo, Peru, on loan from Deportivo La Guaira, Venezuela) & José Andrés Martínez (Philadelphia Union, USA).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (Mazatlán, Mexico), Sergio Córdova (Arminia Bielefeld, Germany, on loan from Augsburg, Germany), Andrés Ponce (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) & Eric Ramírez (DAC Dunajská Streda, Slovakia).

Darren

@DarrenSpherical