Tag Archives: Rubén Cordano

Day 10 – 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20 (Uruguay 3-0 Bolivia & Argentina 0-0 Venezuela)

On the tenth day of the 2017 edition of the prestigious U-20 South American Youth Championship, attention turned to the final matches from Group B, which concluded the entire group stage: Uruguay took on Bolivia, then holders Argentina faced Venezuela. Below are video highlights, brief summaries of each game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting…

groupb270117

(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 3-0 Bolivia

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 27 January 2017 (YouTube)

Uruguay secured their place in the Hexagonal with this comfortable win over Bolivia, who had to await the outcome of the subsequent game to see if they would still be joining them. After 18 minutes, defender Agustín Rogel opened the scoring by knocking in Nicolás De La Cruz’s free-kick from the left. Later, just before half time, Rodrigo Bentancur doubled the lead with a golazo, as he teed himself up for a fantastic strike from just outside the area which swiftly bypassed the goalkeeper’s gloves. Bolivia did make some forward forays but it was mainly Uruguay who created the best chances; they wrapped things up with the third goal in the 83rd minute when Rodrigo Amaral was slid into a one-on-one position in the area – he thus controlled and placed his shot just inside the near post.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

Though the resting of a few notable players as well as the relative ease with which La Celeste‘s youths undertook their task perhaps meant superheroic feats were not required, some players nevertheless had their moments.

Captain Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) was responsible for the 18th-minute free-kick crossed into the area with his right boot from the left which found Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) in a crowd; from this, the centre-back instinctively converted for the opening goal. Aside from this assist, though De La Cruz took some more set-pieces and got into some decent positions, the closest he came to having any role in another goal was his 77th-minute shot; here, from approximately 25 yards, he picked up the ball and quickly struck a good cross-goal effort that the goalkeeper did well to parry wide.

Perhaps more so than during his previous two tournament games, Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors, Argentina) – here, returning from suspension – was more of an attacking threat. From the halfway-line in the 12th minute, the highly-rated holding midfielder came roaming fotward to the edge of area, where he struck low and wide. Ten minutes later, he again gained much space for himself, this time with a nice first touch on the right, though his low ball into the area caused no harm. However, he certainly did some damage in the 44th minute when a corner was eventually knocked towards him just outside the area, somewhat right-of-centre. From here, he took a couple of touches with his right to tee himself up in a standing position that was virtually parallel to the goal-line; subsequently, he unleashed a brilliant left-footed strike that flew past the goalkeeper at the near post to double the lead.

Given the scoreline, 65th-minute substitute Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) did not really need to be a driving force, terrorising opposition players. Nevertheless, though he otherwise managed a minor charge or two as well as a late unremarkable shot, he did also get himself a goal. This came in the 83rd minute when Diego Rossi (No. 16, Peñarol) neatly made his way past a player before playing Amaral into space on the left inside the area; the latter took just one touch before squeezing the ball in at the near post for the third.

One man who made a nuisance of himself throughout the game without, ultimately, making it count was Joaquín Ardaiz (No. 7, Danubio), starting here his first game after two brief substitute appearances. He actually almost scored, not once, but twice: firstly, in the 24th minute when he beat a defender to a through-ball on the inside left; from the edge of the area, he poked a low bobbling shot past the goalkeeper but it came back off the far post. Later on in the 75th minute, he arguably had a better opportunity when he was found in much space, one-on-one; however, despite waiting for the ample moment to lift the ball over the goalkeeper, his effort was too low and easily blocked for a corner. Otherwise, though there’s a fair chance he will hit the back of the net at some point over the next fortnight, the several additional shots and crosses he attempted either missed their targets or were of little serious threat.

boliviaflag Bolivia

Though, as it turned out, a draw would have kept Bolivia in, they were unable to match their opponents and, barring a couple of minor moments, put in a fairly forgettable performance. Indeed, the likes of Limberg Gutiérrez (No. 20, Nacional, Uruguay), Moisés Villarroel (No. 8, Bolívar), Bruno Miranda (No. 11, Universidad de Chile, Chile), Ronaldo Monteiro (No. 9, Bolívar) and Rubén Cordano (No. 1, Blooming) may have suggested potential in their opening day win against Peru. However, there was little from them to get excited about in their subsequent three games; goalkeeper Cordano, for one, has largely discredited himself in the last two matches with some poor fumbles, though he was nevertheless notable here against Uruguay for taking a 53rd-minute free-kick from 25 yards, which went through to his opposite number. The free-kick taking goalkeeper – a fine South American tradition.

However, one man who it may be worth keeping an eye out for in future is 17-year-old Ramiro Vaca (No. 10, Quebracho). He scored a great free-kick against Argentina and also got another one on target as well as nearly setting up a goal against Venezuela; here against Uruguay just before half time, he curled a great right-footed free-kick from around 35 yards, requiring the goalkeeper to parry out wide.

Argentina 0-0 Venezuela

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 27 January 2017 (YouTube)

Not a game to dwell on for too long. Given the result of the preceding encounter, Argentina knew they were already through and did not seem too fussed about nabbing first place off Uruguay; Venezuela, on the other hand, merely required a draw. Thus, neither goalkeeper was seriously tested with instead the closest thing to a goal being one or two blasted efforts off-target and some through balls that just needed a touch of two. Owing to their precarious position, Venezuela could never really relax, though when Argentina had Cristian Romero sent off in the 85th minute, seeing out the draw did become somewhat easier. When the full-time whistle blew, their players understandably rejoiced.

Talent Spotting

argentinaflag Argentina

There are many talented players in the Argentine ranks, though this did not really prove to be the occasion to showcase their abilities.

Although he had less success than in previous games, Tomás Conechny (No. 20, San Lorenzo) was perhaps his side’s liveliest attacking player. The closest he came to scoring occurred in the 63rd minute when he did well to chest a cross from the left, before blasting a left-footed effort from 15 yards that went just over, giving the goalkeeper an almightly fright along the way.

Otherwise, he sometimes won space on the flanks, put in some half-decent balls and generally tried to tee up team-mates. All Argentine moments of semi-interest seemed to involve him and these included: a 10th-minute cross from the left that Tomás Belmonte (No. 17, Lanús) headed straight over; a 12th-minute short ball to Lautaro Martínez (No. 9, Racing Club) who, in turn, passed to Belmonte centrally 25 yards out and whose shot, though well-hit, went wide; a 42nd-minute Conechy left-sided corner that was headed over to the right to be put back into the area by Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club), from whom somehow the ball fell to top-scorer Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors) at an acute angle, though his cross-shot was parried out and cleared; lastly, a 49th-minute Conechny free-kick from 30 yards that dipped low and caused the goalkeeper to awkwardly spill out.

Nevertheless, despite these slim pickings, expect to see much more of these players and some of their team-mates in the Hexagonal stage; as ever, Argentina look to be one of the favourites to claim the trophy.

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Similarly, Rafael Dudamel’s men did not come out all guns blazing seeking a goal, though they did nevertheless cause some trouble in the final third:

In the 23rd minute, goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) – who would later cause concern when Conechny’s free-kick bounced off him – pumped a ball upfield that the returning Yangel Herrera (No. 8, Atlético Venezuela) jumped to knock on; subsequently, the ball whistled just past Antonio Romero (No. 19, Deportivo Lara) in the area and wide. Four minutes later, Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) – who may well be his side’s most useful set-piece taker – curled in a dangerous free-kick from the left which begged for a knock goalwards, but was instead deflected off for a corner. Eight minutes later, right-back Ronald Hernández (No. 20, Zamora FC) surprised many by taking on a couple of players on his flank before working his way into the area; ultimately, he attempted to get a shot away but was blocked off.

In the second half, Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) continued being a sporadic nuisance and the closest he came to having a hand in a goal was his 77th-minute free-kick from the left; this was knocked low through the wall and caused the goalkeeper to block it out, with the ball then being hesitantly cleared for a corner. However, probably the closest Venezuela came to a goal occurred from the free-kick on the left that followed Cristian Romero’s dismissal. Indeed, Ronaldo Lucena dipped this in towards the back post where Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas) was standing, but alas, the ball was just a little too high for the defender.

Nevertheless, for the first time since the Salomón Rondón-led generation of 2009, Venezuela have made it to the final stage of the tournament. Curiously and somewhat impressively, they currently have the best defensive record of the final six teams (one goal conceded in four games) as well as the worst attacking stats (one goal scored in four games). Many eyes will be interested to see whether the likes of Fariñez and Herrera can maintain the former and, on the other hand, whether Soteldo, in particular, can make his dribbles and playmaking count more by playing a role in at least a few additional goals.

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter. The next games will be on 30 January 2017 when the Hexagonal phase, featuring the six qualified teams, gets under way. The matches will be Colombia vs Venezuela, Uruguay vs Argentina and Ecuador vs Brazil – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Day 6 – 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20 (Peru 1-1 Venezuela & Argentina 5-1 Bolivia)

On the sixth day of the 2017 edition of the prestigious U-20 South American Youth Championship, attention turned back to Group B, with Peru taking on Venezuela and holders Argentina facing Bolivia. Below are video highlights, brief summaries of each game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting…

groupb23117

(Source: Wikipedia)

Peru 1-1 Venezuela

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 23 January 2017 (YouTube)

Venezuela struggled to create clear chances for the majority of this game, but a last-minute equaliser has greatly enhanced their chances of qualifying for the Final ‘Hexagonal’ Phase. Despite Peru coming closer to hitting the back of the net in the first half, it was the boys in burgundy who had the best opportunity to do so. Indeed, after being fouled in the 38th minute, Yangel Herrera dusted himself down to take a penalty but his strike was saved onto the bar, with his headed rebound also clipping the top of the framework. After the interval in the 56th minute, Venezuela were made to pay as Peru’s Roberto Siucho took advantage of some defensive indecision to rob the ball and nudge home for the lead. Subsequently, as the clock ticked away, Venezuela saw more of the ball but struggled to create clear chances; thankfully for them, there are always set-pieces. Indeed, in the 89th minute, Ronaldo Lucena’s free-kick was greeted ahead of the goalkeeper by the atoning Herrera, who nodded Venezuela level. However, barely a minute later the bacon-saver received his marching orders after a second yellow card. Nevertheless, thanks also in part to a fine late Wuilker Faríñez stop, Venezuela held on and now look to be in a better position than their opponents to nab one of the three final phase berths.

Talent Spotting

peruflag Peru

Off the back of their blip against Bolivia, Peru generally put in an admirable defensive performance that had more in common with their 1-1 draw against Argentina, rarely letting their opponents gain a clear sight of goal. Therefore, the concession of a late equaliser has really scuppered their chances of qualification, as they now have just the two points with only one game left – as opposed to the two of Venezuela, Uruguay and Bolivia.

If they are able to salvage their campaign on Friday against Uruguay, they will certainly require the creativity of 17-year-old Gerald Távara (No. 7, Sporting Cristal). Indeed, he was away early on, looking to set up and score. After four minutes he wasn’t far off bagging a gol olímpico (from a direct corner) and, three minute later, curled wide a free-kick from 30 yards. He came much closer in the 33rd minute, when a ball fell to him just outside the area on the centre-left; with his left peg, he struck a threatening diagonal shot that went barely a yard wide of the far post. Just after the interval in the 48th minute, he nearly turned provider when he curled in a fine free-kick from the right to the edge of the six-yard-box that found Adrián Ugarriza (No. 19, Universitario), but the latter’s powerful header lacked direction. He later hit another free-kick which went a yard or so wide, but ultimately, though he is quietly suggesting he may be one for the future, he was unable to find the net on this occasion.

However, the player who did get on the scoresheet – and who has netted both of his country’s two goals at this tournament – was Roberto Siucho (No. 11, Universitario). Earlier on in the 31st minute he had threatened the Venezuelan goal when he cut in from the right and sneaked in a left-footed effort; this picked up an opposition touch along the way which caused some additional uncertainty, with the goalkeeper ultimately glad to see it bobble wide. The goal itself came in the 56th minute out of nothing: a headed ball bounced uncomfortably in between two Venezuelan defenders; lacking in communication and decision-making, they allowed Siucho to march in to dispossess and embarrass them, before nudging the ball home to give his country the lead. Just over five minutes later, he actually had another chance; playing a one-two on the edge of the area, he charged forward and shaped for a shot, but was perhaps a bit too close as he struggled to bend the ball around the goalkeeper, who ultimately managed to divert it wide.

Instead, the closest Peru came to a second goal occurred at the death. Indeed, this chance came via a right-sided cross from Bryan Reyna (No. 8, Real Mallorca, Spain), who earlier actually had Peru’s first chance of the match, when he was played by Ugarriza into a half-decent position and subsequently saw his effort palmed over. In the 93rd minute, however, Reyna was looking to supply and his low ball bounced through to Ugarriza’s replacement Fernando Pacheco (No. 16, Sporting Cristal); he immediately snapped to strike a low drive towards the near corner but the goalkeeper was supremely alert to his intentions and denied him his glory with a fine save.

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Captain Yangel Herrera (No. 8, Atlético Venezuela) had quite the game: he could well have ended up being scapegoated for failing to convert a penalty but instead will be hailed by many as a goalscoring saviour – albeit one whose elation was quickly soured by a red card. He played a useful role in his central midfield position, regularly halting central attacks as well as getting forward; senior captain Tomás Rincón may well have a useful partner-in-crime developing here. Indeed, following a left-sided low ball from wing-back José Hernández (No. 5, Caracas FC), it was actually Herrera himself who was fouled to win the 38th-minute penalty. However, though he drove his penalty with exemplary force, the semi-committed Peru goalkeeper did well to leave out a trailing arm which helped parry the ball onto the crossbar; for the rebound, Herrera had to wait for the bouncing ball to fall kindly for his header which, agonisingly, was directed a little too high, clipping the framework before going over. To his credit, he did not let this failure devour his drive and instead ploughed on in the second half admirably. In the 52nd minute, he slid the ball up to the edge of the area to provide a half-chance for the otherwise quiet Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas, Spain), but the latter did not get enough power or direction behind his saved effort. 12 minutes later from an awkward position, Herrera stabbed a knock-down a yard or so wide but, more substantial was a 71st-minute opportunity; here, he received back a one-two in the area, though found himself in a narrow, albeit close, position from which he nudged a low shot a couple of yards wide. Not to be denied though, in the 89th minute, substitute Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) displayed his abilities from set-pieces by curling in a fine free-kick from the left which Herrera rose to emphatically beat the goalkeeper to for the equaliser. His joy was short-lived, however, as barely a minute had passed before a late tackle led to him receiving his second yellow card; thus, with their skipper now out of Wednesday’s must-win game against Bolivia, manager Rafael Dudamel will need to find ways to plug the hole in the middle as well as find alternative ways to create chances.

One man who shall be crucial in unlocking the Bolivian defence will be Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile). However, though his fellow attackers may be equally culpable for the options they sometimes fail to provide him with, he will really need to improve his decision-making in the final third. Indeed, against Peru, he was frequently driving forward, dribbling the ball affectionately with perhaps the lowest centre of gravity that can be witnessed in the entire tournament, yet he struggled to create any clear chances. Perhaps the closest he came to being of effective assistance was the one-two that put Herrera in a somewhat tight shooting position; there were other moments involving the likes of Sergio Córdova (No. 23, Caracas FC), but nothing worth recording for posterity. At times he came across as a frustrating, tunnel-visioned ball-hogger, but these were often during the moments, particularly in the second half, when he also appeared to be running the show for his side. Ultimately, it is imperative for Venezuela that this raw natural talent is harnessed and guided towards more productive ends.

Lastly, the third of Venezuela’s trio of prime talents deserves a mention. Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) can not be blamed for the defensive calamity that was responsible for the goal, but he can certainly be credited with preserving his country’s point. Indeed, although his goal-frame was targeted a fair bit, aside perhaps from an early unexpected attempt direct from a corner and a 62nd-minute close-range Siucho effort, it wasn’t until the last minute of stoppage-time that heroics were demanded of him. He can not have had more than a split-second to anticipate Pacheco’s 93rd-minute strike from Reyna’s cross, but he was more than equal to it as he got down and maintained his side’s promising prospects with a strong save with his gloves.

Argentina 5-1 Bolivia

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 23 January 2017 (YouTube)

The first real hammering of the tournament occurred as Argentina all but assured their place in the Final Phase. Marcelo Torres opened the scoring in the 23rd minute, nodding in from Nahuel Molina’s cross. 13 minutes later, Bryan Mansilla made it 2-0 after a defensive gift allowed him to strike home low from outside the area into the far corner. Just before half time, Torres doubled his tally as he pounced to make it three, after Mansilla’s shot was spilt by goalkeeper Ruben Cordano. The second half began in similar fashion with Tomás Conechny repaying the faith shown in providing him with his first start by cutting inside from the right to strike home a 25-yard golazo with his left boot in the 55th minute. 14 minutes later, Lautaro Martínez crossed in for substitute Lucas Rodríguez’s powerful header to make it five. By this point, Los Pibes had taken things down a notch or two and, consequently, Bolivia made most of their forward forays in this period, even managing a consolation goal. It wasn’t a bad one either: in the 71st minute, substitute Ramiro Vaca curled a fine right-footed free-kick from 25 yards around the wall and into the back of the net.

Talent Spotting

argentinaflag Argentina

He wasn’t prominently featured in many of the tournament previews but, with four goals, Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors) is currently the leading goalscorer – and deservedly so. He notched his first here when the cross of Nahuel Molina (No. 4, Boca Juniors) from deep on the right bounced for him to nod home to give his side the lead; his second came later in the first half when the Bolivian goalkeeper spilled a team-mate’s effort and he was on cue to tap in for 3-0. Otherwise, he was often to be found on the prowl in the final third; for example, in the 30th minute in the interim between his two goals, he had another noteworthy attempt, when he whacked a good, low, hard shot from the right, which was parried wide. Presumably to preserve his powers for future battles, he was denied a further half-hour of hat-trick hunting as he was substituted just before the clock struck 60′.

Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club) was withdrawn not long afterwards, most likely for similar reasons as he and Torres had been the best players of the first half. Indeed, it was he who scored the second goal of the rout after 36 minutes, capitalising on a defender’s dreadful pass that fell to his feet some 25 yards out in a central area; with the goalkeeper out of position, he then placed a textbook left-footed strike into the far corner. He also played a part in the third goal, as it was his strike from 20-odd yards out that was clumsily dealt with, enabling Torres to net his second.

The fourth goal was scored by Tomás Conechny (No. 20, San Lorenzo), who was rewarded here with his first start following his two assists from the bench against Uruguay. His 55th-minute effort was a stunning strike that came after he cut in on the right edge of the area and unloaded with his left, beating the goalkeeper at his near post. A fine golazo indeed and he could well have had another earlier in the 29th minute when he slalomed inside from the left past two players; alas, his strike inside the area with his less-fancied right was somewhat wild and wide of the mark. Otherwise, though he did not play as much of a critical role as he did on Saturday, he did certainly look to set up his team-mates. Perhaps his most notable supplementary effort came in the 42nd minute when he went past a player on the left, then played a low cross which Torres nabbed from surrounding defenders before, from an awkward position, forcing an attempt that went not too far wide.

Lastly, Lautaro Martínez (No. 9 Racing Club) also supplied at least a couple of reasons as to why he is one of Los Pibes’ stand-out performers thus far. Firstly, in the 11th minute from the inside-left, he forced a fine parry from the Bolivian goalkeeper when he rapidly struck a fierce effort with his right boot from 20 yards out. Then, later on in the 69th minute, he whipped in a cross from the left with his right that substitute Lucas Rodríguez (No. 7, Estudiantes de La Plata) did well to powerfully head home at the near post to make it 5-0.

Although they are not yet through, Argentina look to be on their way and, perhaps to nobody’s surprise, have demonstrated that they have some strength in depth in the forward ranks.

boliviaflag Bolivia

Aside from the consolation goal, a fine curled free-kick from substitute Ramiro Vaca (No. 10, Quebracho) some 25 yards out, it would be a tad superfluous to highlight potential cracks based on this performance. Indeed, although Juan Mercado (No. 2, Guabirá) should have also scored soon afterwards but instead missed a tap-in from a knock-on from a corner, both these and the other lesser Bolivian attempts on goal occurred when they were already well on their way to a hiding and Argentina had begun substituting some key players. Thus, while in the last 20-25 minutes the likes of Moisés Villarroel (No. 8, Bolívar) and Bruno Miranda (No. 11, Universidad de Chile, Chile) – though less so erstwhile star Limberg Gutiérrez (No. 20, Nacional, Uruguay), who had a quiet game – exhibited some signs of attacking life, one can almost strike this evidence from the record.

Off the back of a respectable debut tournament performance, goalkeeper Rubén Cordano (No. 1, Blooming) also had a poor game, despite a good early save from Martínez. Nevertheless, if he and his colleagues can regroup, then despite having suffered the first tonking of Ecuador 2017, they are actually still in with a good chance of qualifying second in Group B. Indeed, with three points and two games left against Venezuela and then Uruguay, all may not be so bad in the camp after all.

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter. The next games will be Paraguay vs Chile & Colombia vs Brazil from Group A – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Day 4 – 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20 (Peru 0-2 Bolivia & Argentina 3-3 Uruguay)

On the fourth day of the 2017 edition of the prestigious U-20 South American Youth Championship, attention turned back to Group B, with Peru taking on Bolivia and holders Argentina facing Uruguay. Below are video highlights, brief summaries of each game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting…

groupb21117

(Source: Wikipedia)

Peru 0-2 Bolivia

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 21 January 2017 (YouTube)

Peru were unfortunate not to beat Argentina in their opening game but, to the surprise of some, they came unstuck here against a well-organised Bolivia. In what was a game not short of open spaces, Peru enjoyed the better of the early exchanges, though Bolivia gradually grew in confidence. Despite this, it was nevertheless somewhat unanticipated when Ronaldo Monteiro chased a ball hoisted upfield and slid home the opener after 55 minutes. Further confounding expectations, Bolivia didn’t merely sit back and cling onto their rare lead. Instead, towards the end of their admirable debut performance, they doubled the scoreline, with Limberg Gutiérrez playing in Bruno Miranda to seal the win.

Talent Spotting

peruflag Peru

They only made four changes from the side that nearly beat Argentina, so one can not help but feel that, though having to play twice in three days may have taken its toll, Peru may be better off playing counter-attack football rather than conceding so much open space. Indeed, both Bolivian goals, as well as some other opposition attacks, made Peru look potentially porous, with some of their defenders being either too slow to keep apace of forwards or simply rather sluggish in foreseeing danger.

That said, they did appear to be edging things for at least the first half-hour or so. Although no individual could really be said to have stood out, there were at least a couple of attacks of note. Firstly, in the 21st minute, 17-year-old left-footed corner-taker Gerald Távara (No. 7, Sporting Cristal) swung in a cross that was greeted in a prime central position by fellow 17-year-old club team-mate Fernando Pacheco (No. 17, Sporting Cristal); alas, though his connection certainly possessed power, it was a bit too close to the goalkeeper, who nevertheless deserves credit for getting two strong gloves behind the ball for the parry. Secondly, five minutes later, the perhaps unfortunately-named Mark Estrella (No. 18, Universidad San Martín de Porres), chipped a fine ball forward up the inside-right channel to Rely Fernández (No. 22, Carlos A. Mannucci); with a deft chest, he took it in his stride into the area, though again, despite having the goalkeeper in his sights, his shot from a slight angle went straight at the shot-stopper.

If such chances had been taken, things may indeed have been different. Alas, as this performance left much to be desired, one has to hope that they put in better showings in their other two group games.

boliviaflag Bolivia

In a game in which the perceived quality was condemned by some before a ball had even been kicked, one man stood out above all others: Limberg Gutiérrez (No. 20, Nacional, Uruguay), son of a much-capped former international who he shares his name with. He was often to be found attacking up the inside-left, looking to create chances as well as get away the odd shot himself. He also vied for set-piece duties with another dead-ball threat, Moisés Villarroel (No. 8, Bolívar), and displayed a moment of slight ingenuity in the 33rd minute. Here, as if to highlight that those around him may be on a different wavelength, his diagonal pass to play in Henry Vaca (No. 22, O’Higgins, Chile) in the area ended in embarrassment for the latter; he could not take the ball in his stride, let alone shape to take a shot. Nevertheless, Gutiérrez also had a couple of chances to score himself, with the first of these coming in the 35th minute. At this moment, from the inside-left, he capitalised on a poor clearance, audaciously outpacing a defender into the left side of the area before firing a cross-goal strike, which had to be parried out.

Later on in the 80th minute, following a one-two with Ronaldo Monteiro (No. 9, Bolívar) – target-man and scorer of the 55th-minute opener – Gutiérrez found himself in the area on the left with the goalkeeper in his sights. However, perhaps not believing he hadn’t been flagged offside, he hesitated and hit a somewhat tame shot into the side-netting. Nevertheless, he compensated for this in the 89th minute when he brilliantly turned to leave his marker for dead and then paced up his trusty inside-left channel towards the area. Here, he slid in Bruno Miranda (No. 11, Universidad de Chile, Chile), who finished the job to make it 2-0. Furthermore, a few minutes later, the scorer was not far off bagging another goal with a well-struck shot from the edge of the area, though this was parried out wide.

Finally, though one suspects he will be picking the ball out of his net a fair bit over the next week or so, goalkeeper Rubén Cordano (No. 1, Blooming) often appeared assured and pulled off two or three decent saves, the most notable being a close-range parry from Pacheco’s strong header in the 21st minute.

Argentina 3-3 Uruguay

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 21 January 2017 (YouTube)

For the second day in a row, the second game of the day proved to be a thriller, with both teams coming into it with much to prove after disappointing opening matches. Naturally, some changes were paid and within four minutes, one paid dividends for Uruguay as Rodrigo Amaral hit an unstoppable strike from 25 yards out. Argentina were back on level terms in the 24th minute when Marcelo Torres controlled a diagonal ball, dipped a shoulder and impressively struck home. However, just before half time his side fell behind again as a penalty was converted by Nicolás De La Cruz, who this time took a more prosaic approach from 12 yards. Argentina generally had the better of the second half, knocking on the door, though it wasn’t until the 74th minute that Torres got his second with a powerful header from a corner. It then felt as if only one side could get a third goal but that was soon dispelled when Uruguay won a penalty out of nowhere in the 82nd minute; De La Cruz was no longer on the pitch, so Nicolás Schiappacasse stepped up. However, though Ramiro Macagno saved both his spot-kick and Waller’s rebound, the goalkeeper diverted the latter back to the feet of Schiappacasse, who was able to give Uruguay the lead. Several minutes later though, Rodrigo Bentancur hindered their cause by receiving his marching orders and alas, they could not hold on. In stoppage-time, a Tomás Conechny corner was nodded home, seemingly by the celebrating Lautaro Martínez, though some sources have credited it as an own-goal. Thus, it ended all-square and despite having both played a game extra than Bolivia, it is the unfancied side who are currently at high-altitude atop Group B.

Talent Spotting

argentinaflag Argentina

Playing his first game of the tournament, striker Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors), certainly took his chance, netting two clinical goals. The first came in the 24th minute when a fine, long-range diagonal ball from club team-mate, right-back Nahuel Molina (No. 4, Boca Juniors), was sent over to the left side of the area. Torres controlled exquisitely with the outside of his right boot, before nudging it past a defender and brilliantly striking home. Much later on in the 73rd minute, he did well to get onto the end of a fine free-kick aimed towards the back post; though the angle was difficult, he was nevertheless able to create discomfort and uncertainty with a header that was ultimately diverted wide. From the resulting corner, he rose in exemplary fashion to power home a bullet-header to make it 2-2.

The man who put in both of these pin-point left-footed crosses for Torres was substitute Tomás Conechny (No. 20, San Lorenzo). He came on for the final 20 minutes and is clearly a vital weapon to have sitting about on the bench as he was also responsible for the stoppage-time equaliser. Indeed, his corner was nodded in, some – probably correctly – said by defender Agustín Rogel for an own-goal, while others were willing to credit striker Lautaro Martínez (No. 9 Racing Club). He was somewhat of a lesser threat than he had been against Peru, with the closest he had previously come to scoring in this game being a 31st-minute header that was literally punched into his direction. This came from a sudden rebound after the Uruguayan goalkeeper reacted instinctively to a surprise shot from the left side. Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club) was behind this effort and, later on in the 80th minute, he came rather close to getting on the scoresheet when he shot again from another position that most mortals would have crossed from – this time he clipped the bar.

Before Conechny came on in the 70th minute to boost the goal-hunt, it was the man he replaced who appeared to be the likeliest candidate to be a supplier or scorer. 17-year-old Ezequiel Barco (No. 10, Independiente) was not far away from the scoresheet on at least three occasions: in the 23rd minute, when he struck a swerving 35-yard free-kick which had to be parried low for a corner; in the 53rd minute, when another free-kick curled low around the wall some 20-odd yards out and again had to be parried to the side; and in the 60th minute, when he collected a ball on the right side of the area, shimmied his way into a slightly better position, before striking with his – possibly weaker – left boot, which went a yard or two wide of the far post. At the time, it seemed a slight surprise that Barco was withdrawn from the field, but it is possible that his energy is being saved for upcoming battles; at his age, one would have thought that the coaching staff will be careful not to demand too much, too soon. Nevertheless, expect to see much more of him.

uruguayflag Uruguay

He was a second-half substitute against Venezuela, but here charging midfielder Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) was granted a start as well as the captain’s armband – he did not take long to formally announce himself to observers. Indeed, barely three minutes had gone when he picked up the ball on the inside-left, advanced to 25 yards out and then struck a sensational swerving left-footed shot with the outside of his left boot which crashed into the net for the lead. Just a couple of minutes later, he curled in a fine cross which Agustín Canobbio (No. 19, Fénix) met with a diving header that necessitated a parry. Later on in the 53rd minute, Amaral displayed another aspect of his attacking arsenal when he drew a decent save from a fine free-kick some 25 yards out. Though he was withdrawn from the pitch after 66 minutes when his side was still leading, one suspects that this must have been to protect him ahead of future encounters in this tightly-scheduled competition.

Another man substituted off who nevertheless left a lasting impression was Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay). He especially came to life in the last five or so minutes of the first half, when he looked to play through his team-mates with short defence-splitting passes and even had a chance from open play himself. Indeed, this came in the 43rd minute when Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) – who, whilst rarely generating any eye-catching highlights himself nevertheless appears to be a useful player – set him up with a pass into the area. De La Cruz looked as if he felt the flag was going to be raised and thus ended up hitting a low shot lacking direction or intent at the goalkeeper. However, his most memorable moment occurred in first-half stoppage-time when he went some way towards putting the ghosts of a mere two days ago behind him. Indeed, rather than opt for another Panenka-esque chipped penalty, he instead dispatched his spot-kick in textbook fashion, aiming hard for the top corner.

The other leading attack-minded player, Nicolás Schiappacasse (No. 9, Atlético Madrid), also directly contributed to the result as well as helped to make things happen for others. Indeed, though he missed an opportunity in the first half that De La Cruz set up, he himself looked to make things happen and won some set-pieces throughout the game, including the noted free-kick taken by Amaral as well as the second penalty of the match. This, occurring after he was on the receiving end of a clumsy hack in the 82nd minute at a time when De La Cruz was no longer on the pitch, was taken by Schiappacasse himself. However, his low effort was at a good height for Macagno who parried, yet unfortunately for the goalkeeper, despite also saving a rebound by Waller, the ball fell kindly to Schiappacasse who put Uruguay ahead 3-2 with his first goal of the tournament.

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter. The next games will be Brazil vs Paraguay and Ecuador vs Chile from Group A – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical