Tag Archives: Santiago Bello

Zamora FC 0-3 Montevideo Wanderers – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5 (16 April 2015)

Thursday 16 April 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5

Zamora FC 0-3 Montevideo Wanderers

Estadio Agustín Tovar, Barinas

Goal Highlights of Zamora FC 0-3 Montevideo Wanderers, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 16 April 2015 (Courtesy of YouTube user xpertowinner)

Demoralised Zamora End Campaign on a Familiar Note

Fresh from a 5-0 league drubbing at the hands of lowly Llaneros de Guanare, the Venezuelan champions ended their dismal Libertadores campaign with their sixth consecutive loss – the worst record  of any of the three sides from this nation of perennial underdogs.

Although they were a tad unfortunate to not get anything out of the barnstorming opening-day game against their Uruguayan opponents, judging by the sparsely attended ground, there was little local enthusiasm to see if they could turn them over on their own patch. The match that transpired was to largely dovetail with the atmosphere in which it was played, being largely of little interest to the neutral. This could only benefit the visitors who were actually playing for second place and ultimately succeeded in doing so by taking most of the chances that they engineered, thus finishing above Chilean outfit Palestino.

Though few will have cared at the time, let alone now, Zamora were largely matching their opponents in the first half-hour, with Jhon Murillo running at the defenders and Luis Vargas, amongst others, taking shots from range. However, none of their opportunities were particularly threatening and when the Wanderers took the lead in the 34th minute, those of a fatalistic disposition could not help but feel that the inevitable had arrived. The goal itself was a tap-in by Matías Santos – scorer of the crucial winner in the home tie against Palestino – following a low cross into the goalmouth from Joaquín Vergés. As the half petered out, it was actually Vergés who could have doubled the visitors’ advantage when he was played through a minute before the interval but goalkeeper Edward Ibarbo did well to instinctively put out an arm to deflect the ball over at point-blank range.

The second half began similarly to the first, with Zamora having their fair share of the ball but, largely consigned to fruitless runs on the wings and long shots, rarely creating anything of note. If there was any desire for at least a point it was swiftly lost when the second goal went in after 64th minutes. Receiving a lofted pass from Santiago Martínez on the left flank, Nicolás Albarracín, centrally in the dee, controlled and then clinically struck a perfectly placed left-foot shot into the bottom right-hand corner. The goalscorer, who is still a mere 21 years of age, has been one of the Montevideo side’s best players in this group stage and though he has already experienced a brief spell abroad with Serie B’s Spezia, another foreign foray does not seem out of the question.

Albarracín was to further enhance his reputation by playing a key role in the third and final goal. With two minutes left, he robbed the ball off the dawdling Jordani Abreu some 35 yards from goal, immediately passed to Gastón Rodríguez before inching towards the edge of the area, where he again received the ball and then laid it off for Rodríguez to strike home emphatically. A great bit of teamwork between the two players, both of whom have scored twice in this year’s competition, with all four coming against their beleaguered Venezuelan opponents. Soon after the final whistle was blown, the relatively modest Montevideo club had more reason to celebrate as their place in the knock-out phase had been confirmed following Boca Juniors’ 2-0 victory over Palestino.

Zamora, on the other hand, can take away little from their participation in this year’s tournament. Ultimately, Palestino and Montevideo Wanderers proved themselves to be far from pushovers but, when the draw was made, more than a few Venezuelans felt that the bicampeones would make a decent fist of the fight for second place. Indeed, in last year’s competition they finished just a point off this spot, having recorded wins against more established opposition in the form of Colombia’s Santa Fe and Paraguay’s Nacional. Sadly and yet unsurprisingly, losing key individuals – manager Noel Sanvicente to the national side, midfielder Pedro Ramírez to Sion and top-scorer Juan Falcón to Metz – following their second championship win in May 2014 cost them dearly. To go from pushing hard for a knock-out place to losing every game and having the worst defensive record in the competition (21 goals conceded) is jarring. Given the relatively humble means and stature of this club even within Venezuelan football (their two championship wins are the only two in their history), one can not be confident that they will be making any improvements in the immediate future.

To read more about the shortcomings of their Copa Libertadores campaigns as well as those of their fellow Venezuelan sides, Deportivo Táchira and Mineros de Guayana, make sure you return to this site after the group stage is concluded in its entirety, as there will be an article published. In the meantime, if there is any enthusiasm remaining out there, then look out for the final Libertadores clash involving a Venezuelan side, Mineros de Guayana vs Huracán on Tuesday 21 April, a report of which should also be up on this site soon afterwards.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Boca Juniors 5-0 Zamora FC – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5 (11 March 2015)

Wednesday 11 March 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 5

Boca Juniors 5-0 Zamora FC 

La Bombonera, Buenos Aires

Video Highlights of Boca Juniors 5-0 Zamora, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 11 March 2015 (courtesy of YouTube user xpertowinner)

Exhibition Football as Boca Coast to Easy Victory

Zamora players were spotted before kick-off taking photographs of themselves in one of the most revered pilgrimage sites of world football and they were to follow this up by playing like starry-eyed tourists as their hosts eased to a scoreline that could well have reached double figures.

From the off, Boca were to run their Venezuelan opponents ragged as their passing and movement were both predictably quicker and it took no more than eight minutes for them to find the net. This came from a cross from the left that was weakly headed by Ángel Faría straight out to the edge of the area where Marcelo Meli struck a hard low half-volley past goalkeeper Álvaro Forero, who may have been partially unsighted by Faría.

Just after the quarter-hour mark, the game was dead as a contest. A move in which the hosts were granted far too much space to play a series of slick passes culminated with Federico Carrizo chipping a ball from the left to the back post where Meli knocked it back for Nicolás Lodeiro to strike home. It was the first goal for the Uruguayan international since joining the Xeneizes from Corinthians and he, along with the other two main participants in this goal, were to put in fine attacking performances throughout this match.

On the other side of affairs, Zamora’s primary mode of attack for most of the first half consisted of pumping long balls or crosses from deep positions towards forward Pierre Pluchino who, at 5 foot 10 inches, is far from the ideal target man. However, his side were more concerned with damage-limitation from an early stage and they nearly went three-down little more than midway through the first period.

Indeed, in what was to become a recurring feature of the game, Southampton-loanee Dani Osvaldo squandered a gilt-edged opportunity due to his own rather idiosyncratic brand of nonchalance. Here, as a ball drifted past Zamora’s porous defence, he found himself one-on-one with goalkeeper Forero who he confidently rounded, yet such was his complete lack of urgency, the defender who was initially attempting to catch up with him, Edwin Peraza, had enough time to run all the way past Forero and clear the shot off the line. Clinical, this was not.

Video of Dani Osvaldo’s performance for Boca Juniors vs Zamora, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 11 March 2015 (Video courtesy of YouTube user belzamarbide).

Almost immediately afterwards, 17-year-old Yeferson Soteldo had the visitors’ best attempt of the half as he managed to gain some space just outside the area on the centre-left, before teeing up a strike that went a yard or two over. While the youngster can hardly be said to have been one of the star performances in this particular game, his energy, creativity and willingness to get on the ball do mark him out as one for La Vinotinto followers to keep an eye on.

Nevertheless, this was Boca’s banquet and next up on the menu was a fine individual effort in the 37th minute by Carrizo, who received a pass on the left edge of the area, cut onto his right, bypassed a defender and then struck a pacey shot past Forero. 3-0 and a couple of minutes before the break they thought they had a fourth as Argentina international Fernando Gago slipped through Osvaldo who dinked it past the goalkeeper but alas, he was adjudged to be a couple of yards offside.

In the early exchanges of the second half, the hosts lowered their intensity somewhat with the Venezuelans getting a few harmless efforts on target, but the Argentines remained firmly in control. Osvaldo was consistently the most likely player to score the next goal and yet, in a ten-minute spell, he was to squander three opportunities that another forward with a much more clinical edge would have either buried or converted into a chance for a team-mate. The first, after 55 minutes, occurred when he gained possession of the ball from a defender in the area, yet his attempted lob over Forero was to comfortably clear the crossbar. The second, nine minutes later, was another attempted chip, this time from the edge of the area when a low strike or some other continuation of the attack could well have instead done the trick. It was becoming evident that the naturalised Italian was viewing this game as providing a fine environment in which to score a memorable goal that catered to his rather particular sensibilities. This seemed especially apparent a minute later when he received a cross in the area and attempted an overhead-kick which, unfortunately for him, barely made any contact with the ball.

However, any of the frustrations felt by the ever-tuneful Bosteros in attendance were somewhat assuaged shortly afterwards when Osvaldo tapped in a knock-down by Juan Martínez, who himself had latched onto a chipped ball by man of the match candidate Carrizo. Upon scoring, Osvaldo and his team-mates all congregated at the side of the pitch for a group photograph that has since between retweeted on Twitter over 40,000 times, though not by manager Rodolfo Arruabarrena, who in post-match comments expressed his dislike for the celebration.

With just under ten minutes to go, Osvaldo further ingratiated himself with the home faithful when he won a penalty after drawing a foul from Forero. He then stepped up to convert the spot-kick into the bottom-corner himself – though, as one fan on social media commented, it was something of a surprise that he did not take this opportunity to attempt a 12-yard rabona.

Following this, there was still time for Osvaldo to almost find himself on the scoresheet on two more occasions – the first of which he was incorrectly ruled out from doing so. Indeed, a short pass was slid through to him on the edge of the area which he poked into the bottom corner for what should have been his hat-trick goal, yet the linesman flagged offside despite replays showing that the striker was definitely level with the last man. Despite being denied the match ball here, he was to have another big chance to claim it shortly afterwards when a through-ball reached him six yards out but he nudged it too close to Forero who blocked it wide.

It is no exaggeration to say that Osvaldo could have had at least five or six goals in this outing and the Venezuelans will be grateful that the referee mercifully limited his further opportunities to increase his tally by blowing the final whistle after calling for just one minute of stoppage-time. This, despite a three-minute halt to proceedings earlier in the half, not to mention the gaps following the two goals and the delay after the awarding of the penalty.

Many Bosteros will be hoping that their lead man can iron out some of the unnecessary flourishes to his game but will nevertheless have come away from La Bombonera delighted to have won and extended their lead at the top of Group 5. The Venezuelans, however, will only have their pre-match photographs to smile about as, having lost all three of their games and finding themselves six points behind second-placed Montevideo Wanderers (who beat Palestino 1-0 the previous night), their chances of qualifying for the knock-out stage are all-but-extinguished.

Nevertheless, Zamora must regroup ahead of next week’s reverse fixture at home to Boca and hope to put in a more respectable showing. Irrespective of what happens, feel free to check back here and/or at @DarrenSpherical for further updates on the Copa Libertadores campaign of not only Zamora FC but also those of Mineros de Guayana and Deportivo Táchira.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Copa Libertadores Preview: Deportivo Táchira Join Zamora and Mineros de Guayana on the Grandest Stage

Tonight (17 February) may see Europe’s Champions League return for its knock-out phase, but in South America (and Mexico), attention will be very much on the inauguration of the Group Stage of the 2015 Copa Libertadores, the premier club competition.

Interest will be particularly high in Venezuela, the nation whose clubs have historically made the least impact in this tournament. For the first ever time since the round of play-off qualifiers was introduced in 2005, the continent’s traditional underdogs will be represented by their full quota of three teams, as Zamora (2013-14 champions) and Mineros de Guayana (2013-14 runners-up & Apertura winners) will be joined by Deportivo Táchira (3rd in 2013-14 aggregate table, behind the other two qualifiers).

Highlights of Cerro Porteño 2-2 Deportivo Táchira (3-4 aggregate), 11 February 2015, Copa Libertadores First Round.

(Video courtesy of YouTube user: Enfermos X el fútbol)

Deportivo Táchira’s Asunción Ascension

Táchira, who as well as making four appearances at this stage in the past ten years have also been unsuccessful in each of the three previous times that they have contested the play-off round, finally overcame this hurdle last week when they defeated Cerro Porteño. Perhaps being rivalled only by Palestino of Chile knocking out Uruguay’s three-time winners Nacional as the biggest surprise of the preliminaries, the side from the eponymous state on the Colombian border drew 2-2 in Asunción, thus claiming a memorable 4-3 aggregate victory

Before the first leg was contested on 4 February, the six-time semi-finalists from Paraguay were considered comfortable favourites to progress. Táchira, however, gave short shrift to the supposed script as it took no more than 12 minutes for 34-year-old Argentine Javier López – a recent recruit from Zamora FC – to head in the fine set-piece delivery of 32-year-old erstwhile Venezuela international César ‘Maestrico’ González. Rather than sitting back, San Cristóbal’s finest absorbed and were further invigorated by the raucous atmosphere of a well-populated Pueblo Nuevo and seven minutes later, the fans were to witness a goal that undoubtedly lived up to the significance of the occasion. Maintaining the theme of experience, this came from the much-travelled 37-year-old Jorge Rojas, a recent acquisition from one of the capital’s smaller sides, Metropolitanos, as well as being La Vinotinto‘s third highest-capped player of all-time. Upon receiving a throw-in, Rojas demonstrated why he is known as ‘El Zurdo’, as he let the ball roll into his stride and unleashed an unstoppable left-footed strike from over 30 yards that fizzed in the air before going in off the underside of the crossbar.

A goal surely fit to grace any stadium in the world and a fine example of the strength in depth that exists in this competition. Not to be outdone, five minutes after the restart Cerro were to get what proved to be their consolation and seemingly vital away goal, with a strike that left many impartial observers unsure as to which was the finest of the game. This was a swerving 30-yard free-kick from Jonathan Fabbro, an Argentina-born Paraguay international who has represented clubs in six countries within Latin America and who, at 33 years of age, was well on-message with this game’s theme.

Thus, with an away goal to their name and home advantage for the decisive tie on 11 February to look forward to, Cerro returned to the Paraguayan capital confident that a group berth awaited. When, with 40 minutes on the clock, Fabbro again got on the scoresheet – this time via a dubiously awarded penalty – many home nerves dissipated as now Táchira were compelled to attack in order to avoid elimination, thus leaving them vulnerable on the counter. Yet, while at times the Venezuelans rode their luck, from the very first minute they always looked like they were capable of posing a threat, not to mention a surprise or two, the first of which they delivered on 55 minutes. Gelmin Rivas, the club’s leading goalscorer with 11 goals in 17 league games, followed up the good work of Pablo Olivera – recently acquired from Uruguay’s second tier – to hold off defenders and adeptly side-foot home.

The onus was thus back on the hosts and to their credit, they required little more than five minutes to regain the lead with that man Fabbro again involved in the goal, albeit this time as supplier. He did well on the right of the area to shrug off some challenges before chipping a fine cross into the area that local youngster Cecilio Domínguez chested and dispatched with a consummate ease that belied his 20 years.

However, as the Asunción crowd began pondering whether or not extra-time would be necessary, Rivas abruptly rendered any such musings academic, stunning the home faithful within a minute of the restart. The striker, who was linked with a possible move to Standard Liège or Club Brugge in January, picked up the ball 30 yards out and evaded a challenge to hit a low bouncing shot from the right edge of the area into the bottom far corner. 2-2, the local scoreboard now alarmingly read. Although the goalkeeper Rodolfo Rodríguez probably should have parried this shot away, any anger felt by the home fans had to be suppressed as this sensationally swift turn of events meant that their side now had to frantically get their act together and score twice in just under half an hour.

As it panned out, while Cerro did have the bulk of the remaining chances, Táchira were to resist and hold on, thus not only qualifying for the group stage but also managing to avoid defeat against a side that had reached this very phase in four of the past five years.

Although it is unlikely that fans of Táchira’s El Clásico foes Caracas FC share the following sentiments, it must be said that as this second leg victory was immediately followed by the national team’s second successive win over Honduras in a week, for many Venezuelan football fans this was certainly a day to be savoured.

Previews of Venezuela’s 3 Teams in the 2015 Copa Libertadores

deportivotachira

Deportivo Táchira

With the confidence gained from their impressive win against Cerro Porteño coupled with their return to form in the early stages of Venezuela’s Torneo Clausura, Los Aurinegros should feel that advancing from Group 8 (of 8) is not beyond their capabilities. Indeed, while the encounter with Argentine champions Racing and their strike-force of Diego Milito and Gustavo Bou may cause the most butterflies, their games against Peruvian champions Sporting Cristal and another Paraguayan side, Guaraní, now seem, by comparison, manageable.

Coach Daniel Farías will certainly be hoping his side does not experience a similarly disastrous decline in form that befell them in the 18-team Torneo Apertura when they contrived to fall from 1st at the midway point to a final position of 11th.  To avert this, the form of various key players will be crucial: goalkeeper Alan Liebeskind, who has made a strong impression since joining at the beginning of the Clausura; young centre-back Wilker Ángel, who can chip in with more than his fair share of goals from set-pieces and who may well be heading abroad later in the year; playmaker César González, whose set-pieces and link-up play will be vital, as will be those of Jorge Rojas, though how much of the campaign the latter will feature in at his age remains to be seen; another dead-ball specialist, albeit one surely not concerned with stamina issues is young, creative livewire Yohandry Orozco, a man who will want to use this opportunity to display to a wide audience some of the talent that gained him recognition four years ago; the service of the likes of Orozco, Rojas, González and, to an extent, Pablo Olivera, will need to be spot-on in order for striker Gelmin Rivas to have a prosperous tournament, being as he is in the main a penalty-area predator.

zamorafc

Zamora FC

Before Táchira get their campaign underway with a home game against Racing, the 2013-14 champions of Venezuela will be ushering in their nation’s participation in the tournament with an away game against Montevideo Wanderers. Their Uruguayan opponents will be hosting this encounter at Parque Central, the home of their more illustrious cross-city neighbours, Nacional, whose qualifying-round conquerors Palestino – a Chilean side originally set up by Palestinian immigrants – are the third side in Group 5. The final team is Argentine giants Boca Juniors who, having raised eyes and expectations with the recruitment of Uruguayan international Nicolás Lodeiro, Málaga midfielder Pablo Pérez and striker Dani Osvaldo, promise to be the dominant threat.

Zamora may have won last season’s championship but, as is often the case in South America, they were victims of their own success. Consequently, key individuals were swiftly snapped up by all and sundry, such as midfielder Pedro Ramírez (FC Sion), leading goalscorer Juan Falcón (FC Metz) and, most significantly, manager Noel Sanvicente (Venezuela national team). They thus began the Torneo Apertura campaign in August disastrously, not picking up a win in their first 11 games and finding themselves rooted to the bottom. However, their form was to undergo a remarkable U-turn as their final six games ended with five wins and a draw, salvaging some pride with a final position of 12th. This reversal in fortunes has impressively and, with the reputation of Venezuelan football on the continental stage in mind, thankfully, continued into the second half of the domestic season, as they currently sit 1st in the Torneo Clausura, with four wins and two draws – unbeaten in a total of 13 games.

Key to continuining this impressive transformation under coach Julio Quintero will be the performance of the defence, which has four clean sheets in the past six games and now features some new faces as well as the likes of Panama international Luis Ovalle and the long-serving Moisés Galezo. Other players whose roles will be crucial include deep-lying playmaker, set-piece taker and occasional shield Luis Vargas, as well as fellow midfield stalwart Arles Flores; with his dribbles down the flanks as well as the inroads he makes infield, temperamental-yet-gifted 19-year-old Jhon Murillo – who had an unsuccessful trial with Basel last year – will certainly be hoping to make an impression, as well as chip in with some goals; the man who has been on target the most for the champions and who was the catalyst behind their return to form is attacking midfielder/support-striker Pierre Pluchino, whose elegant creativity and finishing will be crucial; lastly, Santiago Bello, a striker with an impressive record recently brought in from the Uruguayan second tier in advance of the Libertadores – so far yet to start a game, but from whom goals are anticipated.

Minerosdeguayana

Mineros de Guayana

The 2013 Torneo Apertura winners and overall runners-up for 2013-14 have thus far had a rather mediocre season, sacking Richard  Páez (the well-respected former national team manager from 2001-07) and ending the most recent Apertura in 6th place. Their uninspiring form has continued into the Clausura as they sit in 11th place, having played six games – one, and in some cases, two, more than the vast of majority of the sides around them.

Thus, of Venezuela’s three representatives, Mineros are currently heading into this tournament with the worst form. However, they may be able to boost morale ahead of their official entrance into the competition as they will be involved in another league game before they play their opening Libertadores match next week on Tuesday 24 February away to Argentine side Huracán (Update 24/2/15: this game against Estudiantes de Mérida did not take place due to the tragic death of club captain Carlos de Castro. Mineros now find themselves 12th in the table). This newly promoted club – who qualified by virtue of winning the Copa Argentina – will certainly be no pushover, as evidenced by their comfortable 4-0 play-off round win over Peru’s Alianza Lima. The other two sides that will be contesting Group 3 are champions of their respective countries: Club Universitario of Bolivia and Cruzeiro of Brazil, the latter of whom, despite some post-season departures, will be firm favourites and who now count Leandro Damião and Uruguayan prospect Giorgian De Arrascaeta amongst their ranks.

The success or otherwise of Mineros will depend largely on players who have mostly performed at a standard markedly lower than they did last season suddenly raising their game, however unlikely that may seem. Their side consists of many individuals who regularly receive call-ups to the national squad, such as goalkeeper Rafael Romo who, judging by his inaction in the recent Venezuela friendlies, finds himself demoted from second to third choice; Gabriel Cichero who, though certainly not without his critics, is Venezuela’s first-choice left-back and who also possesses attacking qualities, particularly on set-pieces; the two defence-minded midfielders Rafael Acosta and Édgar Jiménez also have their attacking merits, but when playing for the national side have largely been panned, particularly when they were both regularly left for dead in November’s 5-0 thrashing handed out by Chile; striker Richard Blanco recently played and scored a tap-in against Honduras but, as this was a squad of home-based players, he is unlikely to get a regular call-up; depending on form, the Colombian duo of Zamir Valoyes and James Cabezas may well find themselves sidelining Blanco; Cabezas was brought in from recent Apertura winners Trujillanos (where he scored 10 goals in 16 games), along with defender Edixon Cuevas, yet rather than boost the squad, both have thus far struggled to replicate the form they displayed at their old club. As a final consideration, it will be interesting to see how former Venezuela international defender Luis Vallenilla copes against the pace of the likes of Cruzeiro, given that he turns 41 in March.

Venezuelans Flying the Flag: More Bonuses

If following the three clubs was not enough for Venezuelan football fans, there are also some other compatriots who will be competing in this year’s edition for Colombian sides. Luis Manuel Seijas, a left-sided attacking midfielder who features regularly for the national side will be playing for 2014 Torneo Finalización champions Independiente Santa Fe. They have been drawn in Group 1 and their very first match comes tonight away to Mexico’s Atlas after the second game of interest – Táchira’s – has finished – a long night is thus in store for all. The two other teams in their group are 2014 Copa do Brasil winners Atlético Mineiro and last year’s Chilean Clausura winners, Colo-Colo.

In Group 7, Colombia’s 2014 Apertura winners Atlético Nacional should field another Venezuelan international midfielder, Alejandro Guerra. Also in their ranks is Jonathan Copete, a Colombian in origin but who has been in talks for some time now with Venezuelan national boss Noel Sanvicente about naturalisation and who could well feature in future national team squads at some point this year. Irrespective of how his international aspirations pan out, both men come into this competition with strong continental experience, having been part of their side’s run to the final of December’s Copa Sudamericana, in which they were runners-up to River Plate. Their first Libertadores match will be on Thursday 19 February and will be possibly their sternest test, being as it is against Paraguay’s 2014 Apertura and Clausura winners, Libertad. Their other two opponents are Ecuador’s championship runners-up Barcelona and Argentina’s Estudiantes de la Plata, whose President regular Argentine football fans will know is club legend Juan Sebastián Verón. While this is a far from straightforward group to negotiate, Guerra and Copete will fancy their chances of qualifying for the knock-out stage.

Although the general consensus is that the two Colombian sides featuring Venezuelans have more chance of progressing than the three domestic teams, one can not help but feel that no matter what happens, many memorable moments will occur this year for Venezuelan football fans to recall fondly for some time afterwards. It is going to be an enthralling tournament which should be covered as much as possible from a Venezuelan perspective on this site.

Now, that is more than enough talking – let’s get the caffeine ready and prepare for some long nights of top-level action!

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical