Tag Archives: Sergio Córdova

Venezuela 0-1 Paraguay — Conmebol Qualification Stage for Fifa World Cup 2022 (13 October 2022)

“It’s a marathon not a sprint,” said the sadist.

Conmebol Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2022

Tuesday 13 October 2022 — Estadio Metropolitano de Mérida, Mérida

Venezuela 0-1 Paraguay

Full Match Replay (YouTube)

Paraguay Punish Peseiro

A late goal consigned La Vinotinto to a second consecutive defeat, leading some to already cast doubts on their qualification prospects.

It could have been very different for José Peseiro’s men as they had a goal ruled out by VAR and also saw a stoppage-time penalty saved.

That said, even the manager has since confessed that the first half largely belonged to La Albirroja. They dominated possession and looked more likely to score, most notably in the 10th minute when Gastón Giménez tried his luck from outside the area, sweetly striking the top of the bar with a left-footed effort.

Although the hosts were largely subdued in the first 45 minutes, they did nevertheless have the most eye-catching attempt at goal: a spectacular 33rd-minute free-kick from Rómulo Otero that rattled the bar — the dip was such that the goalkeeper Antony Silva was rooted to the spot, praying that it would go over.

Throughout the match there were more than a few ill-tempered moments and cards dished out. No doubt this was mostly owing to what was at stake, but perhaps the less-than-ideal conditions that were allegedly endured pre-game also had an impact on its tone.

Two minutes into the second half, Eduardo Berizzo’s men were again making their attacking presence felt, as Wuilker Faríñez was forced to pull off a double save from first Andrés Cubas and then Ángel Romero.

The Venezuelan side, which had three changes from the one that was easily defeated by Colombia, continued to be largely toothless from open play — that is, until the 65th minute. Here, from a corner, Darwin Machís passed to Cristian Cásseres Jr, who nudged the ball to Otero; on the right byline, the Corinthians attacker then crossed over to the back post where Yangel Herrera headed home.

Virtually all the Venezuelan squad, including substitutes on the touchline, celebrated. Unfortunately for them, however, it was ruled out by VAR as replays showed that the Granada midfielder nodded the ball onto his arm before it hit the back of the net. It was undoubtedly an accident, but such nuances no longer hold any truck.

Possibly fired up by a sense of injustice, the home side did subsequently create more chances. First in the 78th minute when fresh substitute Yeferson Soteldo dinked in a cross that a defender only narrowed diverted away from Herrera’s head. From the resulting corner, the ball found its way to Machís, who swung in a ball that was heaven-sent for Sergio Córdova to make an international statement in the absence of Salomón Rondón. However, his header, although well-powered, was too close to Silva, who parried over.

Given these moments, it felt against the run of play when Paraguay took an 85th-minute lead. This mirrored both teams’ first qualifier in the last campaign nearly five years ago when La Albirroja also won 1-0 on Venezuelan soil via a Derlis González goal at the exact same point in the match.

This time around the hosts’ long-term aspirations took a bruising courtesy of Chicago Fire’s Giménez. His goal came after a measured touch from the right-sided Romero put the ball into the path of Alberto Espínola; then, from the right, the Cerro Porteño man burst into the area on the right to pull back for the MLS midfielder, who swept the ball past Faríñez.

Peseiro was left kicking the air in frustration and promptly made a couple of additional changes, as both sides ended up using all five. His team refused to give up the ghost and won a penalty in stoppage time; this arrived after Ronald Hernández’s hoisted ball was headed on by fellow substitute Fernando Aristeguieta towards Rolf Feltscher, who was nudged over from behind by captain Gustavo Gómez.

With Rondón in China, Herrera instead stepped up five minutes over the regulation 90, but his strike was far too close to Silva, who easily parried away. For the Granada man, this capped off a night that will make him shudder for some time yet, as not only did he also have a goal disallowed but the yellow card he picked up early on — his second in as many games — means he will be ruled out of the next qualifier. Conversely, Silva — the only visiting player to have also featured in that 2015 win — could leave the Mérida pitch feeling very much the hero.

Overall, although Venezuela’s performance certainly wasn’t as woeful as it had been in Barranquilla and the result could’ve been quite different, the bottom line is the scoreline. Perhaps aside from a couple of brief spells in the second half, they did not play like a home side who believed themselves to be viable contenders for a qualification spot.

Things aren’t likely to get any easier for Peseiro: next month’s qualifiers are against Brazil and Chile. No doubt for these he’ll have to deal with another round of Covid-related squabbles and scrambles. It’s a little premature to be too harsh with assessments of the Portuguese coach, but right now it doesn’t feel as if opinions are likely to become much more generous before at least next March, when the fifth and sixth qualifiers are scheduled to be played.

No wonder then that, rather than fly back to Europe, he has reportedly opted to stay in the country where he will confront the unenviable task of trying to fix things sooner rather than later.

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-2-1-2-1): W. Faríñez; R. Feltscher, W. Ángel, J. Chancellor, R. Rosales (R. Hernández, 77′); Y. Herrera, T. Rincón; C. Cásseres Jr (E. Ramírez, 89′); D. Machís (J. Murillo, 84′), R. Otero (Y. Soteldo, 77′); S. Córdova (F. Aristeguieta, 88′).

Note: Venezuela were predicted to set up in a 4-3-3. Maybe at times during the match their players were in that formation, but their shape mostly resembled a 4-2-1-2-1 and, perhaps at other times, a 4-2-3-1 or a 4-5-1.

Paraguay (4-3-3): A. Silva; A. Espínola, G. Gómez, J. Alonso, B. Riveros (O. Alderete, 90+3′); A. Cubas (Á. Cardozo Lucena, 77′), G. Giménez, M. Villasanti; A. Romero (F. Balbuena, 87′), D. Lezcano (A. Sanabria, 76′), M. Almirón (R. Rojas, 90+2′).

Darren

@DarrenSpherical

Colombia 3-0 Venezuela — Conmebol Qualification Stage for Fifa World Cup 2022 (9 October 2022)

Oh football’s bloody back, all right...

Conmebol Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2022

Friday 9 October 2022 — Estadio Metropolitano Roberto Meléndez, Barranquilla

Colombia 3-0 Venezuela

Video Highlights (YouTube)

Atalanta Trio Provide Poor Premiere for Peseiro

José Peseiro’s first game in charge of Venezuela was one to forget as La Vinotinto were put out of sight by a clinical Colombia before the half-time whistle.

The well-travelled Portuguese coach would have been fearing the worst with barely even ten minutes played, as the in-form Darwin Machís was shown a red following a horrific ankle injury suffered by Colombian right-back Santiago Arias. This card, however, was rescinded, as VAR proved the Granada attacker’s role in the incident had been accidental.

It wasn’t much of a reprieve, though, as with 16 minutes on the clock the 11 men of Venezuela fell behind to a Duván Zapata tap-in. Carlos Queiroz’s charges took advantage of the visitors’ laissez-faire marking, with a well-worked move down the full length of the right channel resulting in a low Juan Cuadrado cross that was finished off by the sliding Atalanta forward.

Ten minutes later, the lead was doubled, and this time both Venezuelan full-backs were made to look silly. First, another Atalanta player, left-back Johan Mojica, dribbled into the area, leaving right-back Ronald Hernández flailing on the ground, before passing it to Luis Muriel; Vinotinto left-back Roberto Rosales was again all over the place as Mojica and Zapata’s Atalanta teammate Muriel was able to calmly place it in the back of the net.

On at least a few occasions in the game, Venezuela goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez looked shaky and lacking in focus. Perhaps this was owing to a lack of first-team game time at his new French club, but it’s not the first time he has raised question marks and so post-match calls for Joel Graterol to instead be given a chance will only increase.

In the 35th minute, the Lens acquisition noticeably spilled a shot from Bournemouth’s Jefferson Lerma and was luckily saved by the post. Then, in stoppage time, he probably should have done better for Colombia’s third goal. Here, his counterpart at the other end, Camilo Vargas, threw the ball out to Muriel who, once again, was given the freedom of Junior’s spacious stadium. This time he ran from inside his own half up the left and into the area, where a bit of footwork easily shifted him away from Jhon Chancellor and allowed a strike at the near post. Faríñez made contact with the ball, but could only divert it into the roof of his net for 3-0.

Subsequently, the second half was a bit of a write-off, with a combined total of nine substitutions being made, one of which saw New York Bulls’ Cristian Casseres Jr., son of another international, gain his first cap.

To their credit, the Venezuelans did at least continue to try to get forward, but their attempts throughout the game were mostly from long range and the best one actually occurred in the first half: a fine 36th-minute arrow released by Rosales outside of the area that actually hit the side of the post. Even so, it was the hosts’ substitute Falcao who came the closest in the second period, striking a low effort on the turn that Faríñez was able to block.

Given the soporific offerings of the second half, fans of both nations probably couldn’t wait for the final whistle. When it was blown, Peseiro would have already had plenty of time to contemplate possible future changes, and in the aftermath he conceded that his 4-2-3-1 formation had been a mistake.

One wonders what he’ll have in mind for the upcoming clash in Mérida with Paraguay. It may only be the second game, but a considerable number of home victories will be essential for Venezuela if they are to have any chance of reaching Qatar in two years’ time. Some fans will be able to recall that this very same fixture was actually the first one in the last campaign five years ago; it ended in embarrassment owing to a late defensive mix-up, leaving many deflated upon the first puncture.

Although qualification certainly won’t be secured or squandered at this early stage, to at least quiet down some early discontent, Peseiro really needs to inject a clearer purpose into his team on Tuesday and, hopefully, gain a result.

Team Selections

Colombia (4-1-2-2-1): C. Vargas; S. Arias (S. Medina, 13′), Y. Mina, D. Sánchez, J. Mojica; W. Barrios; J. Cuadrado (A. Morelos, 59′), J. Lerma; J. Rodríguez (S. Alzate, 74′), L. Muriel (F. Fabra, 59′); D. Zapata (R. Falcao, 74′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, W. Ángel, J. Chancellor, R. Rosales (R. Feltscher, 79′); T. Rincón, Y. Herrera; J. Murillo (Juanpi, 82′), J. Savarino (R. Otero, 67′), D. Machís (C. Cásseres Jr., 78′); S. Córdova (A. Ponce, 67′).

Darren

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Conmebol Qualifying Campaign for Fifa World Cup 2022 — October 2020 Preview

We all know things are far from what they could be and how we’ve landed in this situation. No doubt you’ve all got far more important things to worry about and it’s certainly understandable if you’ve lost interest. Nevertheless, some ambitious folk have been summoned to dream on a global scale — let’s hope we can all be able to do the same sooner rather than later.

Conmebol Qualifiers for FIFA World Cup 2022

Friday 9 October 2020 — Estadio Metropolitano Roberto Meléndez, Barranquilla.

Colombia vs Venezuela

Tuesday 13 October 2020 — Estadio Metropolitano de Mérida, Mérida.

Venezuela vs Paraguay

Image

“This game is not between Peseiro and Queiroz; it is between Venezuela and Colombia” — tell that to this blogger, José.

Quote from AS; image from Marca.

Come On Then, If We Must

In common with all other Conmebol nations, Venezuela belatedly begin their Qatar 2022 World Cup qualifying campaign after nearly 11 months of inaction.

Such a lengthy gap between matches is certainly not without precedent for La Vinotinto; after all, it was only two years ago that they returned from a 10-month hiatus to face the same country that they will first encounter this time around: neighbours Colombia. They’re also definitely not strangers to shambolic preparations, which, given all the hurdles the c-word has thrown at them in the run-up, is just as well.

Still, pity the new manager.

New manager? Ah yes, a bit of background may be in order: Rafael Dudamel, the man who led the under-20 side to second place at the 2017 World Cup, finally had enough. No more federation politics and restrictions to navigate for him, as he was instead lured away at the turn of the year by Brazilian giants Atlético Mineiro. There, he lasted less than two months, getting the boot after prematurely exiting the Copa Sudamericana and the Copa do Brasil. He was then promptly replaced at Mineirão by former Argentina, Chile and Sevilla boss Jorge Sampaoli, which brings us back to Dudamel’s successor at international level.

Well, it’s not Sampaoli, is it? No, but in early February many fans thought it was going to be as talks were reported to have reached a very advanced stage. In a swift and hazy turn of events, however, José Peseiro was instead announced as the new man at the Venezuela helm. Despite the Portuguese 60-year-old having previously managed the likes of Sporting Clube de Portugal and Porto, it would be fair to say his reception was underwhelming, with many confessing to have never heard of him. Perhaps they could be forgiven, as not only has he struggled to pick up much silverware but also in recent years he has rarely stayed anywhere long enough to be remembered: his last six appointments have each lasted a mere matter of months. This does not bode well for the long-term project he has landed himself, even if the pandemic has already allowed him to boost his longevity credentials.

Despite these reservations, maybe he’ll be able to command a greater level of authority within the dressing room, owing in part to having trained players of the highest calibre. Indeed, in a curious — he may prefer the word “irrelevant” — subplot, not only has he led top teams within his homeland, but during the 2003/04 season he was also the assistant manager at Galácticos-era Real Madrid. Who was he second in command to? Oh, only his compatriot and current Colombia coach, Carlos Queiroz.

Although many of the Venezuelan players may have also scratched their heads upon his appointment, he’s certainly had plenty of time to familiarise himself with them: pre-lockdown he got Josef Martínez back on board, embarked on a tour to meet various talents and then named a 40-man preliminary squad in March for the qualifiers that we’re now catching up with. Since then, he’s been in touch with many of the chaps and has no doubt watched countless videos. Despite this, he hasn’t had much time with them on the training ground, so he’s not expected to implement any radically new tactical schemes just yet.

Of the 29 players he has in his squad, all of them play their club football outside of their homeland — this is probably for the best, not least because the domestic league has yet to restart (scheduled return date: 14 October). Even so, although it is a strong crop, Peseiro will have to contend without several key individuals: talismanic striker Salomón Rondón and midfielder Júnior Moreno have both been prevented from joining up by their clubs and the country’s most high-profile defender, Parma new-boy Yordan Osorio, is also missing.

Facilitated by this latter absence, a starting position at centre-back had been on the cards for Mikel Villanueva (who has been enjoying a new lease of life in the Portuguese top flight), but injury the day before the opener has ruled him out. It’s too early to say whether he’ll recover in time to face Paraguay. Yeferson Soteldo and Fernando Aristeguieta are also currently in Colombia and had reportedly been part of Peseiro’s plan A, but their respective difficulties entering the country mean they are unlikely to be kicking off in Barranquilla.

With Aristeguieta probably exhausted, Rondón virtually incarcerated in a Chinese hotel and Josef Martínez nursing a long-term injury, it is set to be a big moment for Germany-based Sergio Córdova, who has been used as the sole striker in training.

Since this time last year, over half of the players in this squad have moved clubs. Goalkeeper Wuilker Faríñez is one, having joined newly promoted Ligue 1 side Lens. However, as he has yet to play, there have been some calls to instead give the No. 1 shirt to his fellow U20 World Cup teammate Joel Graterol, who has been chalking up league and Libertadores appearances at Colombian side América de Cali. That said, for now at least, it’s still Faríñez who will be between the sticks.

Another player who has embarked on a new club life in 2020 is Jefferson Savarino, having been snapped up by Atlético Mineiro during Dudamel’s brief tenure; the attacking midfielder’s since put in some good performances and has won the state championships.

He is predicted to start behind Córdova in the line of three alongside Jhon Murillo and Darwin Machís. Regarding the latter, he and his Granada teammate Yangel Herrera (who is set to be in a holding midfield duo with captain Tomás Rincón) are arguably their nation’s top-performing players at the moment, having finished seventh in La Liga last season and recently qualified for the group stage of the Europa League.

Elsewhere, there are also some fresh faces in the squad, such as three of the four-man MLS contingent who will be hoping for their first caps, but the likely line-up is, once all caveats have been taken into account, very familiar. According to a reliable source, Peseiro will set up his men in a 4-2-3-1:

W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, W. Ángel, J. Chancellor, R. Rosales; T. Rincón, Y. Herrera; J. Murillo, J. Savarino, D. Machís; S. Córdova.

Venezuela haven’t actually beaten Colombia for five years, but when they do play them, the result is usually close. As for Paraguay, the last time the two nations squared off was a memorable encounter three years ago on the final matchday of the last qualifying campaign: a goal by 19-year-old Yangel Herrera in Asunción simultaneously ended the hosts’ dreams, while allowing the youthful visitors to envisage a much more prosperous future.

The circumstances may not be ideal, but the time has come for them to start delivering on their promise.

Venezuela Squad

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Lens, France, on loan from Millonarios, Colombia), Alain Baroja (Delfín, Ecuador) & Joel Graterol (América de Cali, Colombia).

Defenders

Roberto Rosales (Leganés, Spain), Alexander González (Dinamo București, Romania), Mikel Villanueva (Santa Clara, Portugal), Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), Jhon Chancellor (Brescia, Italy), Ronald Hernández (Aberdeen, Scotland), Luis Mago (Universidad de Chile, Chile) & Miguel Navarro (Chicago Fire, USA).

Midfielders

Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Rómulo Otero (Corinthians, Brazil, on loan from Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Darwin Machís (Granada, Spain), Juan Pablo Añor (No club, recently released by Málaga, Spain), Yangel Herrera (Granada, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil), Jefferson Savarino (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Bernaldo Manzano (Atlético Bucaramanga, Colombia, on loan from Deportivo Lara, Venezuela), Eduard Bello (Antofagasta, Chile), Cristian Cásseres Jr. (New York Red Bulls, USA), Arquímedes Figuera (César Vallejo, Peru, on loan from Deportivo La Guaira, Venezuela) & José Andrés Martínez (Philadelphia Union, USA).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (Mazatlán, Mexico), Sergio Córdova (Arminia Bielefeld, Germany, on loan from Augsburg, Germany), Andrés Ponce (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) & Eric Ramírez (DAC Dunajská Streda, Slovakia).

Darren

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – March 2019 Preview

Four months after a pair of Asian draws, Rafael Dudamel has convened his latest squad who once again find themselves in Spain to confront a challenging friendly double-header. Here, with the Copa América already less than three months away, @DarrenSpherical has a look at the current batch hoping to stay within the manager’s plans.

International Friendly

Friday 22 March 2019 – Estadio Wanda Metropolitano, Madrid, Spain

Argentina vs Venezuela

Unofficial International Friendly

Monday 25 March 2019 – Estadi Montilivi, Girona, Catalonia, Spain

Catalonia vs Venezuela

wandametropolitano

View of the Wanda Metropolitano, Madrid. (Wikipedia)

Considerable Clashes Await Copa-eyeing Vinotinto

Perhaps not the most exciting, but certainly the most eye-catching name on manager Rafael Dudamel’s 25-man squad list is that of 32-year-old veteran Luis Manuel Seijas.

With an emphasis on youthful potential being nurtured and developed very much the order of the day, the international career of the Colombia-based Santa Fe midfielder had long seemed over. Indeed, even before the Under-20s reached the final of the 2017 World Cup, Seijas appeared to have parted ways with the national set-up, following talks with Dudamel. These statements came hot on the heels of his last and most infamous appearance in a Vinotinto shirt: 18 June 2016, Quarter-final of the Copa América Centenario. On this day against Argentina in Foxborough, Massachusetts, he made himself the object of global ridicule when his weak, sub-Panenka chipped penalty was easily caught by goalkeeper Sergio Romero.

Given this unforgettable embarrassment, many people – if they gave him any further thought at all – came to assume that he had been excommunicated indefinitely. Evidently not. Nearly three years on, where will he fit in? Although he can play on the left of midfield, a role in front of the defensive line seems more likely; alternatively, owing to the ongoing uncertainties at left-back, an experiment there does not seem entirely out of question either. All this being said, it is hard to envisage him being much more than a back-up in any of these positions but, at the very least, his 67 caps of experience could provide a mental boost in the changing room.

Elsewhere in the squad, creative midfielder Juanpi – currently loaned out by Spanish second division side Málaga to top-flight strugglers Huesca, where he plays alongside Yangel Herrera – is also set to put on the burgundy shirt for the first time in a while. November 2017 against Iran was the 25-year-old’s last outing and he will be seeking to re-establish himself as part of the long-term plans, thus delivering on the potential that some of his early club and country outings indicated.

Although cultivating the abilities of youngsters is going to be key with regard to the underlying aim of qualifying for the 2022 World Cup, only one player from the most recent crop of Under-20 talents makes it into this squad. Perhaps this is due to their ultimately unsuccessful qualifying campaign earlier this year or maybe it is simply not yet their moment. Either way, Jan Carlos Hurtado (Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata, Argentina) could well soon become a useful squad member. Indeed, the striker – who was actually also a part of the 2017 Under-20 World Cup squad – gained many plaudits at Chile 2019, due to his bustling runs, forward play and, especially, his two goals in the 2-0 win over Brazil. Although Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England) is the undisputed leading man – with Atlanta United hotshot Josef Martínez sometimes, but not always, joining him in attack – Hurtado could well develop into a more-than-capable deputy. Another man vying for this status within the current squad is the more experienced Fernando Aristeguieta, who is having a superb season in Colombia with América de Cali, so far netting 9 goals in 10 league games.

Regarding the other six, more involved, members of the 2017 silver generation squad who are present here, diminutive dribbler Yeferson Soteldo is the most noteworthy inclusion, having not played internationally for 16 months. This has not been due to any dip in form – even if he did divide opinion at Universidad de Chile, he now wears the hallowed No. 10 shirt at Santos in Brazil – but instead a combination of visa and family issues which prevented him from joining up with the most recent squads. With Adalberto Peñaranda, Romúlo Otero and Jefferson Savarino all having been omitted, he, along with Sergio Cordóva (Augsburg, Germany), will be looking to regain one of the ever-competitive attacking-midfield positions.

Their erstwhile youth-level team-mates who have also received call-ups are: versatile midfielder Yangel Herrera, right-back Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), centre-back Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay) and undisputed first-choice goalkeeper, Wuilker Fariñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia).

The coaching staff will be hoping that these young players as well as the many others who are in their early-to-mid twenties will gel effectively with the more experienced internationals, such as Rondón, captain Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) and right-back Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain). Perhaps it bodes well for the team that all three of these individuals are currently enjoying above-average goalscoring seasons with their respective clubs.

In press comments made on the eve of the first game, Dudamel curiously stated that “We are not experimenting at all. [That] stage has already passed”. Possibly he was referring to tactical systems (with a three-man midfield having been his most notable trial last year), although it is also true that the vast majority of players in this current squad also received call-ups in 2018. Thus it seems that the coach has an ever-crystallising conviction as to who will make the cut in June, albeit one that does not preclude a few latecomers from staking a claim.

Whoever gets picked and whoever ultimately shines, Venezuela have two significant confrontations on the horizon, the first of which comes on Friday when they face Lionel Messi and co. at the majestic home of Atlético Madrid. Argentina are never an inconsiderable proposition, although perhaps their dubious World Cup displays as well as the pair of draws that Venezuela achieved against them in the Russia 2018 qualification phase will offer La Vinotinto some encouragement. Then, on Monday, they will be at the home of Girona to face the non-FIFA-affiliated Catalan national side, who can count Xavi, Gerard Piqué and a host of primarily La Liga players in their ranks. With a 4-2 defeat against another autonomous region of Spain – the Basque Country, in October 2018 – still fresh in the memory, Dudamel’s men will be striving to use their superior collective preparation to their advantage. That’s certainly not something that can be said often.

Venezuela Squad

venezuelamarch2019squad

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Alexander González (Elche, Spain), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Palestino, Chile), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain) & Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Huesca, on loan from Málaga, Spain), Sergio Córdova (Augsburg FC, Germany), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Cádiz, Spain, on loan from Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Luis Manuel Seijas (Santa Fe, Colombia) & Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (América de Cali, Colombia), Jhonder Cádiz (Vitória Setúbal, Portugal), Jan Carlos Hurtado (Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata, Argentina), Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA),  Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Iran 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (20 November 2018)

Venezuela concluded their rare foray into the Asian continent on the neutral territory of Qatar. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides a match report of their latest friendly outing…

International Friendly

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran 1-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Iran 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 20 November 2018 (YouTube)

La Vinotinto Leave Asian Tour Undefeated

Rafael Dudamel’s much-changed side ended 2018’s late run of six away games with their second consecutive draw.

Contested by two sides seeking to try out new players and approaches, it was not a flair-filled end-to-end thriller, but it did nevertheless contain several significant moments.

The first of these came after nine minutes when an Irani cross found Sardar Azmoun inside of the six-yard box. Unmarked, a goal seemed certain, yet his effort from point-blank-range was miraculously diverted over the bar by the renowned prospect Wuilker Faríñez.

In the following exchanges, goalmouth action was to be in short supply, with Venezuela’s sole effort coming from an untroubling shot on the spin from Josef Martínez. That is, until the 35th minute when captain Tomás Rincón slid a ball forward that was latched onto by the left-sided Darwin Machís; in turn, the Udinese attacker cut onto his right and struck a low effort that creept under the dive of the goalkeeper.

La Vinotinto were now ahead, but they had to be on their toes. Just two minutes later following a defensive giveaway, Faríñez was again called upon, this time to parry a well-hit, though relatively comfortable, strike from Ali Gholizadeh. However, three minutes before the break the Charleroi man had more success, after the ball was robbed off Rincón and knocked into his path. From here, the forward gained space away from centre-back Jhon Chancellor and, from the edge of the area, fired clinically with his left boot past Faríñez.

Going into the break level boosted the morale of Carlos Queiroz’s men and, upon the restart, surely aided them in being much quicker out of the blocks. They were certainly more alert than right-back Ronald Hernández, who in the 49th minute was mugged of the ball by Medhi Taremi, who marched on the Venezuelan goal, but this one-on-one was once again blocked by Faríñez. Then two minutes later, a major setback appeared on the cards as Taremi was brought down in the area by Chancellor and the referee pointed to the spot. However, after consulting the pitch-side VAR monitors, the decision was reversed and Venezuela could breathe a little easier.

Subsequently, the South Americans managed to quell opposition danger with greater success and in the 64th minute, they momentarily thought that they had retaken the lead. Here, a ball suddenly found its way to the feet of Josef Martínez, who made room for  himself away from the goalkeeper and fired home, but alas, the linesman’s flag was up.

As also occurred against Japan last Friday, the game was to then suffer under the bloated weight of a high number of substitutions. However, after this lull, two more chances were created, with each being struck by Venezuelan replacements. First, in the 84th minute, Salomón Rondón took a ball in his stride and fired it across goal, causing the goalkeeper Amir Abedzadeh to pull off a decent parry. Then, two minutes from time on the inside-left within the area, Real Salt Lake’s Jefferson Savarino received a threaded ball from Luis González. Although at a slight angle, he was alone with the goalkeeper, rapidly controlling before firing, but to the frustration of a team-mate in the middle his shot went wide of the mark.

Even though he was offside, it seemed like an eminently scoreable scenario, but ultimately Dudamel’s men had to settle for another draw. On the balance of play, this was probably the fairest result and with an overall record for 2018 of two wins, two draws and two defeats, the manager can’t be too displeased. Still, he will know better than anyone that the present cycle has really only just begun and even just consolidating the team’s current level will be a task that will require negotiating with care. Indeed, at the time of writing, he will most likely have to wait until March to have another look at his full squad. In the meantime, it remains to be seen how the players will progress at their clubs and what, if any, bearing the performances of the latest Under-20 crop in the upcoming Sudamericano tournament will have on his thinking.

Team Selections

Iran (4-3-3): A. Abedzadeh; R. Rezaeian (S. Moharrami, 74′), M. Khanzadeh, S. Hosseini, M. Mohammadi; S. Ghoddos (M. Soleimani, 74′), O. Ebrahimi, V. Amiri (M. Torabi, 65′); A. Gholizadeh (S. Dejagah, 74′), S. Azmoun, M. Taremi (K. Rezaei, 81′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): W. Faríñez; R. Hernández, J. Chancellor, W. Ángel, B. Añor; J. Moreno; S. Córdova (J. Murillo, 74′), Y. Herrera (J. Savarino, 61′), T. Rincón,  D. Machís (L. González, 81′); J. Martínez (S. Rondón, 74′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Japan 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (16 November 2018)

Venezuela’s Asian tour has got underway, with Japan the first stop. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides an account of the events in Ōita…

International Friendly

Friday 16 November 2018 – Ōita Bank Dome Stadium, Ōita, Kyushu Island, Japan

Japan 1-1 Venezuela

Goal Highlights of Japan 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 16 November 2018 (YouTube)

El General Rallies the Troops Late On

Having soaked up a considerable amount of Japanese pressure, Venezuela eventually managed to gain a draw on the first leg of their Asian tour courtesy of the first-ever international goal by captain Tomás Rincón.

The opening exchanges had a rather different complexion, however, as Rafael Dudamel’s reinforced line-up – Rincón, Júnior Moreno and the returning Yangel Herrera were all fielded in the middle – enjoyed a few notable chances. First of all, after 11 minutes, a ball ricocheted into Salomón Rondón’s path, who nudged it past debuting US-born goalkeeper Daniel Schmidt; the effort of the Newcastle striker was inches from crossing the line until defender Takehiro Tomisayu stretched to clear at the last moment.

Rondón again came close just four minutes later, following a free-kick on the right edge of the area won by the dynamic Darwin Machís. Although the Magpie’s initial attempt was blocked, he responded by lashing a fearsome left-footed strike which almost grazed Schmidt’s far post. Later in the 25th minute, Rondón played a ball on for roaming right-back Roberto Rosales who, somewhat similarly to the previous effort, also hit an effort with his less-favoured left boot that went across goal and not too far wide of the mark.

Throughout all of this, the hosts were also a threat, occasionally finding gaps, storming forward before a cross would typically be thwarted by a defender. Their first clear chance came in the 26th minute when some quick passes left the ball at the feet of Ritsu Doan, who spun and shot past goalkeeper Rafael Romo. Vinotinto hearts were in mouths, but mercifully for them, the Groningen man’s effort went narrowly wide of the post. Soon after at the half-hour mark Japan were again not far off when Takumi Minamino crossed low for Yuya Osako, though the visitors were to have 20-on-Monday Nahuel Ferraresi to thank, as he put in a sliding boot to divert out. Four minutes later, Romo was to be the momentary hero, as a defence-splitting pass forward found Shoya Nakajima whose one-on-one shot the goalkeeper manfully stood up to, diverting wide.

However, La Vinotinto could not completely stem the tide and so in the 39th minute, the hosts found the opener. Here, Nakajima’s free-kick was swung in from deep on the right and Marseille defender Hiroki Sakai met it in the air to volley home with aplomb. 1-0 and, just under two minutes before the break, Nakajima almost doubled the lead when, on the inside-left, he cut onto his right before firing low into the side-netting.

As the second half began, La Vinotinto knew they needed to get a foothold back into the match, but unfortunately for them, the hosts were in no mood to be accommodating. Subsequently, the majority of the best chances were to fall to Japan, one of which was a shot by Getafe midfielder Gaku Shibasaki that Romo parried at his near post. A few minutes later, the Samurai Blue had another opportunity when Osako slid the ball to Doan, but the latter’s effort from the left was blocked low by the goalkeeper.

Shortly afterwards the pace of the game was to be gradually diluted by the raft of substitutions, one of which was the 74th-minute introduction of international debutant, Bernardo Añor. Yet, just a minute later, the hosts were to regain some of their attacking momentum as Genki Haraguchi earned himself some space from his marker and, with some close control, danced his way into an acute spot to the left of the goal, but his attempt was greeted by the wall of Romo. The 28-year-old Cyprus-based shot-stopper has only been a part of Dudamel’s thinking since the dawn of this new cycle in September, but on the basis of his two appearances within that time, he has shown enough to be confidently described as Wuilker Faríñez’s understudy.

Despite the Japanese having the better of the game, five minutes later goalscorer Sakai was to squander his side’s on-field superiority as he clumsily brought down substitute Luis González in the area. After a delay, captain Tomás Rincón stepped up and confidently converted the penalty, bringing his side level when a defeat was beginning to seem inevitable. In the 91st minute, El General managed to rescue his side again when, following some ball-waltzing from Koya Gitagawa, he put in a perfectly-timed last-ditch challenge to slide the ball wide.

Following a header in the final throes of stoppage-time the hosts did actually have the ball in the back of the net, but a linesman’s flag quickly halted the elation in the stands. Thus, the game ended in a creditable 1-1 draw for Dudamel’s men. Although – some early first-half pressure and attempts aside – the performance left something to be desired, this result against a World Cup-level opponent in front of over 33,000 of their fans certainly feels like a respectable outcome. Fans will be hoping they can go one step further in Qatar on Tuesday, when the side face a similarly tough encounter against Carlos Queiroz’s Iran.

Team Selections

Japan (4-2-3-1): D. Schmidt; H. Sakai, M. Yoshida, T. Tomiyasu, S. Sasaki; W. Endo, G. Shibasaki; R. Doan (K. Sugimoto, 77′), T. Minamino (J. Ito, 77′), S. Nakajima (G. Haraguchi, 68′); Y. Osako (K. Kitagawa, 68′).

Venezuela (4-1-4-1): R. Romo; R. Rosales, N. Ferraresi, J. Chancellor, L. Mago (B. Añor, 74′); J. Moreno (J. Savarino, 90+5′); J. Murillo (L. González, 65′), Y. Herrera (A. Romero, 65′), T. Rincón, D. Machís (S. Córdova, 84′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 65′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – November 2018 Preview

It is said that good things come in threes and this appears to hold true for the Venezuelan national team, who for the third consecutive month, will contest a pair of friendlies. Here, @DarrenSpherical has a look at the latest La Vinotinto squad.

International Friendlies

Friday 16 November 2018 – Ōita Bank Dome Stadium, Ōita, Kyushu Island, Japan

Japan vs Venezuela

Tuesday 20 November 2018 – Hamad bin Khalifa Stadium, Doha, Qatar

Iran vs Venezuela

bernardoanor

Bernardo Añor in January 2018 (@Caracas_FC)

Venezuela Embark On First Asian Tour Since 2014

It may not have seemed it during the ten months of inaction following La Vinotinto‘s friendly with Iran in the Netherlands 12 months ago, but Rafael Dudamel’s modest request for “at least five friendlies for 2018” is set to be fulfilled.

Indeed, match No. 5 sees the South Americans travel to Japan and No. 6 has them confronting, once again, Carlos Queiroz’s men – albeit, this time in Qatar – bringing the number of Russia 2018 participants faced in recent months to four.

September and October’s encounters yielded mixed results (two wins and two defeats) in what has been and will remain to be for some time, a period of trials and tactical refinement. This is again reflected in the squad, not least in arguably the most eye-catching inclusion: Bernardo Añor, son of the former international of the same name and the elder brother of Málaga’s Juanpi. The 30-year-old may well finally make his international debut after a career spent entirely in the USA until this year, when he returned home to play for Caracas FC. A left-back who has been known to play further upfield, he will provide competition for the only other domestic-based player in this crop, Carabobo FC’s Luis Mago. The latter is also somewhat of a newcomer to the fold, having only made his debut two months ago and together the pair will be seeking to permanently remove the omitted Rolf Feltscher from the manager’s thinking.

It is debatable whether Añor’s belated international call-up will lead to much in the long-run but one player that surely all fans will be excited to re-embrace is the returning 20-year-old captain of 2017’s Under-20 silver generation, Yangel Herrera. The New York City FC midfielder has recently recovered from a long-term injury and will hope to regain his spot next to senior armband-wearer Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) from the main beneficiary of his 12-month international absence, fellow MLS ball-winner Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA).

Elsewhere, the previously injured Salomón Rondón is also back, surely on a high after his first two league goals for Newcastle United. His deputy Andrés Ponce (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia) made the most of his rare opportunities last month, bagging a goal in each friendly. However, although the 22-year-old forward deservedly keeps his place in the squad it is likely that, for the time being at least, Dudamel will be devoted to making the partnership of the Magpies’ new favourite no. 9 and hotshot Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA) work.

Just behind this front line, Sergio Córdova (Augsburg, Germany) and Darwin Machís (Udinese, Italy) are also back after some time on the sidelines. The right-sided Colombia-based Luis “Cariaco” González has received a call too, with Dudamel evidently wanting another look at the Tolima man after he impressed in spells in September. With so many changes in the make-up of the attacking-midfield, inevitably there have been some noteworthy players who will sit out this double-header. This time it is the turn of Rómulo Otero (Al Wehda, Saudi Arabia, on loan from Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Adalberto Peñaranda (Watford, England) and the betrothed-but-injured headline-grabber Eduard Bello (Deportes Antofagasta, Chile). With experimentation very much the order of the day, these three will surely all be back next year.

One man who should currently be in Japan vying for one of these positions but isn’t is Chile-based 21-year-old midfield jinker Yeferson Soteldo. He had been summoned but in an official press release, he is said to have missed his flight from Santiago and, consequently, “due to the decision of national team manager Rafael Dudamel he will not form part of the group”. This follows on from last month when he was compassionately omitted so that he could stay at home to attend the birth of his third child and from September, when he was called up but ultimately left out as he could not gain a visa to enter into the USA. Thus, for one reason or another the much-touted youngster has not worn the Vinotinto shirt since the Iran match last year. Although time appears to be very much on his side, his many admirers should feel a little concerned at the ground he is currently conceding to his rivals in this most competitive of areas within the squad.

Lastly, centre-back Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) – whose status has quietly risen in recent times, culminating in him wearing the captain’s armband last month when Rincón was rested – will also not be making the trip to Japan, but he will at least be available for the Iran clash.

In their previous duel with the Middle Easterners in November 2017, La Vinotinto were defeated by a solitary goal and the last time they faced Japan back in 2014, a 2-2 draw was retrospectively converted into a 3-0 loss, owing to the fielding of an ineligible Salomón Rondón. As will be repeated for some time yet in these pre-Copa América months, results may not be of paramount importance, but any improvement on these two outcomes will no doubt provide a boost for everyone’s belief in the nascent Qatar 2022 project.

Venezuela Squad

vinotintonov2018

(Note: Having reportedly missed his flight, Yeferson Soteldo will now not be part of this squad.)

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Bernardo Añor (Caracas FC), Jhon Chancellor (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia), Nahuel Ferraresi (CF Peralada-Girona B, Spain, on loan from Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Carabobo FC), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal) & Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Sergio Córdova (Augsburg FC, Germany), Luis González (Deportes Tolima), Yangel Herrera (New York City FC, USA, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Aristóteles Romero (Crotone, Italy) & Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA).

Forwards

Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA), Andrés Ponce (Anzhi Makhachkala, Russia), Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical