Tag Archives: Tomás Belmonte

Brazil 2-2 Argentina (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 4, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 8 February 2017)

The third and final game which took place on Hexagonal Matchday 4 of the 2017 U-20 South American Youth Championship saw Brazil face Argentina. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

hexagonal8217

(Source: Wikipedia)

Brazil 2-2 Argentina

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 8 February 2017 (YouTube)

With less than ten seconds left of stoppage-time, Argentina equalised to keep their hopes of World Cup qualification alive, but this draw nevertheless leaves them with only an outside possibility of gaining the fourth and final spot for South Korea 2017. They went behind after 10 minutes when Richarlison controlled a long ball in the area and, at the second bite of the cherry, directed a shot into the back of the net. Argentina were on level terms in the 26th minute when a corner was knocked into the path of Brian Mansilla, who instinctively found the back of the net. In the second half, Brazil won a penalty which, after some delay, Felipe Vizeu converted in the 66th minute. However, with elimination seeming on the cards, Los Pibes slightly stepped up their game though still looked like they were doomed until the 95th minute when Tomás Conechny knocked in a cross that Lautaro Martínez nodded home. Thus, Brazil, with five points, will have to wait and hope that they can see off Colombia on Saturday before confirming their qualification, though this is nevertheless a superior position to be in than Argentina, who will have to beat Venezuela and, most likely, hope other results (such as a Colombian win/draw) go their way.

Talent Spotting

brazilflag Brazil

It was not really a game in which any individual talent repeatedly stood out, so what follows instead is a list of key opportunities, including the goals. Some players may not have had more than one moment of note, but avid watchers of this tournament will know that this is far from the first time that certain individuals have created a good chance or scored. What’s that cliché about how ‘you don’t notice him all match and then he goes and does something like that…’?

Brazil’s opening goal came in the 10th minute when a sublime pinpoint ball was played forward from the centre-circle by Maycon (No. 17, Corinthians) who found Richarlison (No. 18, Fluminense); at the second attempt whilst down on the turf, the latter was able to guide the ball low into the corner to make it 1-0 and gain his second goal of the tournament. Eight minutes later, Matheus Sávio (No. 20, Flamengo) curled in a free-kick from the left with his right that Léo Santos (No. 15, Corinthians) headed onto the crossbar; subsequently, another ball was put in from the right which Santos headed on and Lyanco (No. 4, São Paulo) knocked into the back of the net, but alas, the flag had been raised. In the 39th minute, Richarlison twist-and-turned on the left just outside the area before hitting a right-footed effort wide of the mark. Then, three minutes later, Richarlison returned a pass to Guilherme Arana (No. 6, Corinthians) who bombed into the area by the left byline before putting in a dangerous low cross, though nobody could connect with it.

Into the second half, left-back Arana – who has two goals in this tournament – came forward into the area again in the 56th minute, though his well-hit shot went just wide of the far post. However, despite not really putting their opponents under too much pressure, Brazil were granted an opportunity to regain their lead in the 66th minute; following a tug in the area, Felipe Vizeu (No. 9, Flamengo) stepped up to convert a penalty to make it 2-1 and gain his fourth goal of the competition.

Otherwise, Brazil didn’t create a great deal else and while they largely dealt with the relatively mild Argentine pressure, they ultimately fell short. Nevertheless, win on Saturday against Colombia – who may be bottom but did actually beat Brazil in the first stage – or at least match Argentina’s result and they will be through.

argentinaflag Argentina

As with Brazil, there certainly wasn’t anyone running the show for Argentina, though those involved with the goals were nevertheless some of their best players of the tournament. Thus, what follows are details on their best opportunities, including the two that they put away.

In the 16th minute, Juan Foyth (No. 13, Estudiantes de La Plata) hit a strike with his left boot from 25 yards, which the goalkeeper had to parry before gathering, though in truth it wasn’t too challenging. Nine minutes later, Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club) created a better opportunity when he got past a player on the right before poking in a ball with the outside of his left boot, which a Brazilian defender deflected just over his own bar. Then, from the subsequent corner taken by Lucas Rodríguez (No. 7, Estudiantes de La Plata), Cristian Romero (No. 2, Belgrano) headed it on and Mansilla stuck out his leg to knock the ball home to make it 1-1. In the 32nd minute, Tomás Belmonte (No. 17, Lanús) picked up a ball on the edge of the area before firing over on the turn and three minutes later from long range, Mansilla whacked an effort that went wide but caused a minor scare. However, a far more substantial chance came in the 43rd minute when Rodríguez raced up the right in space and crossed it for Mansilla; it seemed like a textbook breakaway goal was about to be scored but alas, his volley went marginally wide of the post.

Into the second half, Argentina really looked like they were heading out after going 2-1 down, creating hardly anything until the 72nd minute. Indeed, at this point, substitute Tomás Conechny (No. 20, San Lorenzo) received a chipped ball from fellow substitute Ezequiel Barco (No. 10, Independiente) though his shot from the left of the area was blocked for a corner, which Conechny himself crossed over everyone to the other side. 11 minutes later, Milton Valenzuela (No. 3, Newell’s Old Boys) looked like he was about to put in a cross from the left edge of the area though his ball, probably unintentionally, instead went just over, hitting the roof of the net. Then a couple of minutes later, the other substitute Ramón Mierez (No. 22, Tigre) was on the receiving end of two knock-ons from corners but couldn’t get a good connection on either.

However, in the 95th minute, not long after Conechny sliced a shot and all seemed lost, the same man was able to put in a fine left-footed cross from the left which found the head of Lautaro Martínez (No. 9, Racing Club) who headed home his third tournament goal to ensure his country fights to the last day.

However, even if they beat Venezuela, the odds, other matches and their goal difference are all very much stacked against them. If they make it to South Korea in May, they’ll need to either admonish a savage beating and/or hope at least one of the other games very much goes their way – frankly, whilst they can not be counted out, one does not fancy their chances.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 4 were Ecuador vs Colombia and Uruguay vs Venezuela – talent-spotting articles have also been published for these matches.

Otherwise, the fifth and final Matchday of the Hexagonal will be on 11 February 2017 and the games shall be Argentina vs Venezuela, Colombia vs Brazil and Ecuador vs Uruguay – expect to see one last bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Uruguay 3-0 Argentina (Hexagonal Group Stage, Matchday 1, 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20, 30 January 2017)

With six teams having qualified from the initial group stage, the Final Phase – also known as the Hexagonal – of the 2017 edition of the U-20 South American Youth Championship is now under way. The second of the three games which took place on Matchday 1 saw Uruguay face Argentina, in a rapid rematch of the two sides’ 3-3 draw nine days prior. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting… 

30117grouo

(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 3-0 Argentina

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Hexagonal Group Stage, 30 January 2017 (YouTube)

Following a 32nd-minute straight red card awarded to Argentina’s Tomás Belmonte, Uruguay went on to comfortably win on what was, in the first half in particular, a rather puddle-laden pitch. Before this game-changing moment, Los Pibes had actually been the more threatening, but just six minutes after the dismissal, Uruguay went ahead following a sensational low, long-range effort from Nicolás De La Cruz. Barely two minutes later, their lead was doubled as left-back Mathías Olivera was played into some space on the left of the area and struck home at the near post. The game was all but over at the break and La Celeste‘s youths effectively killed off any slim hopes of a miraculous fightback when, in the 62nd minute, Rodrigo Amaral ghosted in to head home a cross to make it 3-0. The remaining half-hour was thus the dampest of damp squibs, with the final whistle coming as blessed relief for Argentina, who will surely need a rather strong recovery in order to be within a shout of retaining their title. Uruguay, on the other hand, have put themselves in a commanding position.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

In the 17th minute, Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) curled in a free-kick that Carlos Benavidez (No. 8, Defensor Sporting) at the back post directed goalwards but which the goalkeeper saved. De La Cruz did also look to play in some of his other team-mates but his one outstanding contribution to the game was the opening goal after 38 minutes. Indeed, seemingly out of nowhere, he picked up the ball some 35 yards out, put it onto his right, then unleashed a brilliant, swerving strike, that curled slightly away from the far post before ultimately creeping low and inside of it.

Though perhaps less notable than some of his compatriots in previous games, Facundo Waller (No. 15, Plaza Colonia) has quietly impressed in this tournament and actually played a role in the two subsequent Uruguayan goals. In the 40th minute, he was the target of a pinpoint, diagonal ball from Benavidez which he nodded on from the left flank into the path of left-back Mathías Olivera (No. 5, Club Atlético Atenas). He, in turn, took advantage of some very slack tracking followed by some poor goalkeeping before, from the left inside the area, managing to squeeze a shot in at the near post to double his side’s lead. Later in the 62nd minute, Waller was on the right flank and adjusted to put in a bouncing cross with his left which Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) sneaked in to head low to make it 3-0. Regarding the goalscorer, whilst this goal made him joint top-scorer in the tournament with four goals, it must be said that other than this moment, he didn’t do a great deal else of note during the match. Furthermore, as he hasn’t yet lasted a full 90 minutes of any game and appears to be carrying some extra weight (or is it just a case of ‘big bones’?), one wonders if this potential star is fully fit.

Otherwise, goalkeeper Santiago Mele (No. 1, Fénix) made at least a few decent saves, with a particularly notable one occurring in the 28th minute, when he just about got his gloves on a low drive from Torres.

Lastly, a quick mention for Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors), who was on the receiving end of a horrific late studding from Belmonte and, quite probably as a consequence, was later withdrawn, limping off in the process. No word yet on the condition of the Juventus target, though given the quality he has occasionally displayed during the tournament, one hopes that he makes a speedy recovery.

argentinaflag Argentina

Given that, owing to the recklessness of Tomás Belmonte (No. 17, Lanús), Argentina did not have many opportunities to go forward, they can’t really be said to have had any standout players. They did, nevertheless, have some chances in the opening half-hour when they had eleven men on the pitch.

First of all, in the 6th minute, Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club) did well to roam from the left flank into the area before dinking a ball towards the back post for Lucas Rodríguez (No. 7, Estudiantes de La Plata). However, his header looked as if it bounced against the arm of Olivera, yet it was a corner not a penalty that was awarded. Five minutes later, from a free-kick 30 yards out on the inside-right channel, Nicolás Zalazar (No. 14, San Lorenzo) drove a powerful shot that arrowed just a yard or so over. Perhaps the closest Argentina came to a goal occurred in the 27th minute when a cut-back was deflected into the path of Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors); the prolific striker thus shaped to place his left-footed effort low into the corner but was denied by a good Mele save. The subsequent corner was then headed towards Torres at the edge of the six-yard-box, yet by the time that he got his footing sorted out, his attempt was rapidly blocked by Mele.

Otherwise, left-back Milton Valenzuela (No. 3, Newell’s Old Boys) put in several decent crosses throughout the game, even if none of his colleagues made a telling connection.

Finally, the only real chance Argentina had after the sending off came late in the day when Uruguay were about to pack up. Indeed, this occurred three minutes from time when Zalazar put in a fine cross from the inside-right which found substitute Ramón Mierez (No. 22, Tigre), though his header was well-parried by goalkeeper Mele.

Ultimately, after this write-off, Argentina will hope to bounce back and, with eleven men, display more of their attacking abilities; however, Colombia, like virtually all the other teams left in the competition, should prove to be stiff opposition.

The two other games played on Hexagonal Matchday 1 were Colombia vs Venezuela and Ecuador vs Brazil – please click to read talent-spotting articles for these encounters. 

Otherwise, Matchday 2 of the Hexagonal will be on 2 February 2017 and the games shall be Colombia vs Argentina, Uruguay vs Brazil and Ecuador vs Venezuela – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Day 10 – 2017 Sudamericano Sub-20 (Uruguay 3-0 Bolivia & Argentina 0-0 Venezuela)

On the tenth day of the 2017 edition of the prestigious U-20 South American Youth Championship, attention turned to the final matches from Group B, which concluded the entire group stage: Uruguay took on Bolivia, then holders Argentina faced Venezuela. Below are video highlights, brief summaries of each game and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-spotting…

groupb270117

(Source: Wikipedia)

Uruguay 3-0 Bolivia

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 27 January 2017 (YouTube)

Uruguay secured their place in the Hexagonal with this comfortable win over Bolivia, who had to await the outcome of the subsequent game to see if they would still be joining them. After 18 minutes, defender Agustín Rogel opened the scoring by knocking in Nicolás De La Cruz’s free-kick from the left. Later, just before half time, Rodrigo Bentancur doubled the lead with a golazo, as he teed himself up for a fantastic strike from just outside the area which swiftly bypassed the goalkeeper’s gloves. Bolivia did make some forward forays but it was mainly Uruguay who created the best chances; they wrapped things up with the third goal in the 83rd minute when Rodrigo Amaral was slid into a one-on-one position in the area – he thus controlled and placed his shot just inside the near post.

Talent Spotting

uruguayflag Uruguay

Though the resting of a few notable players as well as the relative ease with which La Celeste‘s youths undertook their task perhaps meant superheroic feats were not required, some players nevertheless had their moments.

Captain Nicolás De La Cruz (No. 11, Liverpool, Uruguay) was responsible for the 18th-minute free-kick crossed into the area with his right boot from the left which found Agustín Rogel (No. 18, Nacional) in a crowd; from this, the centre-back instinctively converted for the opening goal. Aside from this assist, though De La Cruz took some more set-pieces and got into some decent positions, the closest he came to having any role in another goal was his 77th-minute shot; here, from approximately 25 yards, he picked up the ball and quickly struck a good cross-goal effort that the goalkeeper did well to parry wide.

Perhaps more so than during his previous two tournament games, Rodrigo Bentancur (No. 20, Boca Juniors, Argentina) – here, returning from suspension – was more of an attacking threat. From the halfway-line in the 12th minute, the highly-rated holding midfielder came roaming fotward to the edge of area, where he struck low and wide. Ten minutes later, he again gained much space for himself, this time with a nice first touch on the right, though his low ball into the area caused no harm. However, he certainly did some damage in the 44th minute when a corner was eventually knocked towards him just outside the area, somewhat right-of-centre. From here, he took a couple of touches with his right to tee himself up in a standing position that was virtually parallel to the goal-line; subsequently, he unleashed a brilliant left-footed strike that flew past the goalkeeper at the near post to double the lead.

Given the scoreline, 65th-minute substitute Rodrigo Amaral (No. 10, Nacional, Uruguay) did not really need to be a driving force, terrorising opposition players. Nevertheless, though he otherwise managed a minor charge or two as well as a late unremarkable shot, he did also get himself a goal. This came in the 83rd minute when Diego Rossi (No. 16, Peñarol) neatly made his way past a player before playing Amaral into space on the left inside the area; the latter took just one touch before squeezing the ball in at the near post for the third.

One man who made a nuisance of himself throughout the game without, ultimately, making it count was Joaquín Ardaiz (No. 7, Danubio), starting here his first game after two brief substitute appearances. He actually almost scored, not once, but twice: firstly, in the 24th minute when he beat a defender to a through-ball on the inside left; from the edge of the area, he poked a low bobbling shot past the goalkeeper but it came back off the far post. Later on in the 75th minute, he arguably had a better opportunity when he was found in much space, one-on-one; however, despite waiting for the ample moment to lift the ball over the goalkeeper, his effort was too low and easily blocked for a corner. Otherwise, though there’s a fair chance he will hit the back of the net at some point over the next fortnight, the several additional shots and crosses he attempted either missed their targets or were of little serious threat.

boliviaflag Bolivia

Though, as it turned out, a draw would have kept Bolivia in, they were unable to match their opponents and, barring a couple of minor moments, put in a fairly forgettable performance. Indeed, the likes of Limberg Gutiérrez (No. 20, Nacional, Uruguay), Moisés Villarroel (No. 8, Bolívar), Bruno Miranda (No. 11, Universidad de Chile, Chile), Ronaldo Monteiro (No. 9, Bolívar) and Rubén Cordano (No. 1, Blooming) may have suggested potential in their opening day win against Peru. However, there was little from them to get excited about in their subsequent three games; goalkeeper Cordano, for one, has largely discredited himself in the last two matches with some poor fumbles, though he was nevertheless notable here against Uruguay for taking a 53rd-minute free-kick from 25 yards, which went through to his opposite number. The free-kick taking goalkeeper – a fine South American tradition.

However, one man who it may be worth keeping an eye out for in future is 17-year-old Ramiro Vaca (No. 10, Quebracho). He scored a great free-kick against Argentina and also got another one on target as well as nearly setting up a goal against Venezuela; here against Uruguay just before half time, he curled a great right-footed free-kick from around 35 yards, requiring the goalkeeper to parry out wide.

Argentina 0-0 Venezuela

CONMEBOL U-20 South American Youth Championship 2017, Group B, 27 January 2017 (YouTube)

Not a game to dwell on for too long. Given the result of the preceding encounter, Argentina knew they were already through and did not seem too fussed about nabbing first place off Uruguay; Venezuela, on the other hand, merely required a draw. Thus, neither goalkeeper was seriously tested with instead the closest thing to a goal being one or two blasted efforts off-target and some through balls that just needed a touch of two. Owing to their precarious position, Venezuela could never really relax, though when Argentina had Cristian Romero sent off in the 85th minute, seeing out the draw did become somewhat easier. When the full-time whistle blew, their players understandably rejoiced.

Talent Spotting

argentinaflag Argentina

There are many talented players in the Argentine ranks, though this did not really prove to be the occasion to showcase their abilities.

Although he had less success than in previous games, Tomás Conechny (No. 20, San Lorenzo) was perhaps his side’s liveliest attacking player. The closest he came to scoring occurred in the 63rd minute when he did well to chest a cross from the left, before blasting a left-footed effort from 15 yards that went just over, giving the goalkeeper an almightly fright along the way.

Otherwise, he sometimes won space on the flanks, put in some half-decent balls and generally tried to tee up team-mates. All Argentine moments of semi-interest seemed to involve him and these included: a 10th-minute cross from the left that Tomás Belmonte (No. 17, Lanús) headed straight over; a 12th-minute short ball to Lautaro Martínez (No. 9, Racing Club) who, in turn, passed to Belmonte centrally 25 yards out and whose shot, though well-hit, went wide; a 42nd-minute Conechy left-sided corner that was headed over to the right to be put back into the area by Brian Mansilla (No. 11, Racing Club), from whom somehow the ball fell to top-scorer Marcelo Torres (No. 21, Boca Juniors) at an acute angle, though his cross-shot was parried out and cleared; lastly, a 49th-minute Conechny free-kick from 30 yards that dipped low and caused the goalkeeper to awkwardly spill out.

Nevertheless, despite these slim pickings, expect to see much more of these players and some of their team-mates in the Hexagonal stage; as ever, Argentina look to be one of the favourites to claim the trophy.

venezuelaflag Venezuela

Similarly, Rafael Dudamel’s men did not come out all guns blazing seeking a goal, though they did nevertheless cause some trouble in the final third:

In the 23rd minute, goalkeeper Wuilker Fariñez (No. 1, Caracas FC) – who would later cause concern when Conechny’s free-kick bounced off him – pumped a ball upfield that the returning Yangel Herrera (No. 8, Atlético Venezuela) jumped to knock on; subsequently, the ball whistled just past Antonio Romero (No. 19, Deportivo Lara) in the area and wide. Four minutes later, Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC) – who may well be his side’s most useful set-piece taker – curled in a dangerous free-kick from the left which begged for a knock goalwards, but was instead deflected off for a corner. Eight minutes later, right-back Ronald Hernández (No. 20, Zamora FC) surprised many by taking on a couple of players on his flank before working his way into the area; ultimately, he attempted to get a shot away but was blocked off.

In the second half, Yeferson Soteldo (No. 10, Huachipato, Chile) continued being a sporadic nuisance and the closest he came to having a hand in a goal was his 77th-minute free-kick from the left; this was knocked low through the wall and caused the goalkeeper to block it out, with the ball then being hesitantly cleared for a corner. However, probably the closest Venezuela came to a goal occurred from the free-kick on the left that followed Cristian Romero’s dismissal. Indeed, Ronaldo Lucena dipped this in towards the back post where Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas) was standing, but alas, the ball was just a little too high for the defender.

Nevertheless, for the first time since the Salomón Rondón-led generation of 2009, Venezuela have made it to the final stage of the tournament. Curiously and somewhat impressively, they currently have the best defensive record of the final six teams (one goal conceded in four games) as well as the worst attacking stats (one goal scored in four games). Many eyes will be interested to see whether the likes of Fariñez and Herrera can maintain the former and, on the other hand, whether Soteldo, in particular, can make his dribbles and playmaking count more by playing a role in at least a few additional goals.

To keep up-to-date with the latest from Ecuador 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter. The next games will be on 30 January 2017 when the Hexagonal phase, featuring the six qualified teams, gets under way. The matches will be Colombia vs Venezuela, Uruguay vs Argentina and Ecuador vs Brazil – expect to see another bout of talent-spotting from these encounters on Hispanospherical.com. 

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical