Tag Archives: USA

Venezuela 2-1 USA (AET) (Quarter-final, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 4 June 2017)

Like Venezuela’s preceding encounter, their Quarter-final clash with the USA at the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup took 120 minutes to decide, but ultimately Rafael Dudamel’s breathtaking men got what they deserved. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSpherical‘s armchair talent-tracking…

venezuelausa

(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results and fixtures)

Venezuela 2-1 USA (AET)

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Quarter-final, 4 June 2017 (YouTube)

Though it took them in excess of 90 minutes, Venezuela’s dominance eventually paid off as they sensationally carried their history-making mission into the Semi-finals.

The chances La Mini-Vinotinto created are too innumerable to recall in full, yet as each minute passed with the scoresheet still blank it looked as if it could end up being one of those days. Indeed, within the first minute, they came close from a Nahuel Ferraresi header and also in this half both Adalberto Peñaranda and Sergio Córdova had chances, with the latter actually thinking he had scored in the 21st minute. Alas, his strike was belatedly ruled out for offside.

Just three minutes into the second half, Ronaldo Lucena’s corner was greeted by the head of Ronaldo Chacón though, unfortunately for him, his powerful effort rattled the crossbar. Lucena was to put in more than a few dangerous balls and another of these, in the 61st minute was headed by Córdova, yet again, this rebounded off the bar. Córdova, the tournament’s joint-top scorer with four goals, was to have more – some, rather gilt-edged – opportunities to score in both regulation- as well as extra-time, yet ultimately departed the field without having added to his tally.

Amongst others, Peñaranda also failed to convert a couple of opportunities – one, a particularly galling miss – yet, at the very end of the 90 minutes, both he and Córdova only narrowly avoided going home with guilty consciences. Indeed, at the death, USA had a clear chance to steal the victory yet, despite beating Wuilker Fariñez to a chipped ball from the left, Erik Palmer-Brown’s header went agonisingly wide.

Thus, for the second Venezuela game in a row, a further 30 minutes were required. Having looked destined to squander every chance that they could conjure, even they must have been a little surprised when Peñaranda opened the scoring just six minutes into the first additional half, sliding home substitute Samuel Sosa’s left-sided cross. Later, with just five minutes remaining, their lead was doubled when Ferraresi rose high to head home Lucena’s corner. Game over – or so it seemed. Indeed, barely two minutes later, partly capitalising on some Venezuelan joy-infused slackness, the USA pulled a goal back when Jeremy Ebobisse headed in a Brooks Lennon free-kick.

Nevertheless, though there was a nervy end to the game, Rafael Dudamel’s men could breathe a sigh of relief at the final whistle, which was swiftly followed by some elated celebrations of their astounding achievement of reaching the final four of the greatest competition for their age group.

Talent Tracking
venezuelaflag Venezuela

Thankfully, someone broke the deadlock and, perhaps fittingly, it was to be Venezuela’s best attacker of the tournament, Adalberto Peñaranda (No. 7, Málaga, on loan from Watford), who did the honours.

Previously, he had been involved in several notable attacks, such as in the 13th minute when his low right-footed shot was parried out wide. Then, in the 24th minute, he played a fine pass to Ronaldo Peña (No. 9, Las Palmas Atlético) whose left-footed shot went only just wide of the post. Later on in the 73rd minute, he had a golden opportunity to score when, from an acute angle within the area, he fired a ball into the goalmouth, where it took three pinball-esque ricochets before returning to him in a promising position with the goalkeeper floored. However, instead of allowing for some composure to lead him through the situation, he instinctively swung his left boot at the ball and was to somehow watch his shot evade the gaping net.

Two minutes from regulation time, he almost had another good chance when Yangel Herrera (No. 8, New York City FC, on loan from Manchester City) played one of several incisive through-balls from largely deep positions that he was to distribute throughout the game. The captain was again to have an impressive game, also helping to ensure that the back four had very little to do over the 120 minutes. Regarding this particular pass, however, almost as soon as it found Peñaranda, a defender was close enough to be able to quickly block the shot.

Nevertheless, the Málaga loanee was not to be denied and, six minutes into extra-time, he side-footed a good left-sided cross from Samuel Sosa (No. 15, Deportivo Táchira) into the back of the net, thus scoring his second goal of the tournament.

Had Peñaranda not scored, one wonders if Venezuela would have made the breakthrough as frustrations were mounting with every miss from their many opportunities – not least following those that fell to Sergio Córdova (No. 19, Caracas FC). Indeed, he did manage to get the ball in the back of the net after 21 minutes with a low strike, though this was ruled out for offside and. subsequently, the four-goal striker’s composure was to repeatedly desert him as on another day he could have easily bagged a hat-trick.

It was in the second half, in particular, that his crimes in front of the opposition goal were committed. Firstly, in the 54th minute he had a virtually free header in the centre yet glanced it wide. Seven minutes later, he was slid through following a great pass by Herrera, yet despite being practically one-on-one with goalkeeper Jonathan Klinsmann, his low shot lacked placement and was comfortably blocked. A couple of minutes later, he was perhaps unfortunate when he rose well to head powerfully against the crossbar. Then, almost immediately afterwards in the 64th minute, Córdova fashioned a chance of his own from the inside-right edge of the area, curling a left-footed effort a couple of yards wide of the far post.

So many opportunities in what was barely ten minutes of action garnered him some unwanted attention and judgements. Much later on in the first minute of extra-time, he was to have another good chance when Herrera’s superb ball from deep was controlled by the forward yet, before he could pull the trigger, Klinsmann was there to nab the ball off him. Lastly, soon after Peñaranda gave Venezuela the lead, the scorer nearly turned provider when he dinked a fine central ball which put Córdova one-on-one yet, frustratingly, he nudged the ball far too gently at the goalkeeper, with his shot also lacking direction.

Had he put a couple of these opportunities away – the 54th-minute free header and the 61st-minute nod against the bar – Ronaldo Lucena (No. 16, Zamora FC), in particular, would have been a satisfied man as he set them up. The ever-impressive midfielder with his lofted balls could well have had even more assists to his name. Indeed, it was he who also crossed into the area in the 48th minute for Ronaldo Chacón (No. 11, Caracas FC) to batter the bar with a header. Lucena’s crosses were a threat from the off, with one that drew a fine save from Klinsmann coming after less than minute. The man who headed this was centre-back Nahuel Ferraresi (No. 4, Deportivo Táchira) and, some 114 minutes later, he was to ensure that Lucena was not to be denied his assist when he towered high from his team-mate’s pinpoint corner to nod home Venezuela’s second goal.

Overall, though they somewhat sloppily conceded their first goal some 507 minutes into the tournament, this was an otherwise impressive performance from Venezuela, even if they could have been a considerable bit more clinical. Though the USA did not offer much going forward, the defence nevertheless did well not to allow the four-goal Josh Sargent a sniff. However, owing to an accumulation of yellow cards, two of their number will unfortunately be suspended for the Semi-final: the impressive centre-back Williams Velásquez (No. 2, Estudiantes de Caracas, soon-to-be Udinese, on loan from Watford) as well as left-back José Hernández (No. 5, Caracas FC). That said, Dudamel does possess two back-up players with more than enough experience – particularly in qualifying – to suggest that they possess the abilities to do effective jobs within this rather well-drilled system.

Uruguay, their opponents in the South American battle on Thursday 8 June 2017, will certainly provide a stern. However, given all that Venezuela have achieved as well as the knowledge that they were the only side to defeat the CONMEBOL champions in qualifying, they have every right to believe that they stand a strong chance of making the Final. Now, wouldn’t that really be something?

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the two remaining South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

 

USA 1-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (3 June 2017)

Somewhat overshadowed by events in South Korea, Venezuela’s senior national side have begun their two-stop American tour…

International Friendly

Saturday 3 June 2017 – Rio Tinto Stadium, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

USA 1-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of USA 1-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 3 June 2017 (YouTube)

Youthful Venezuela Maintain Composure To Earn A Draw

As younger representatives of the two nations were preparing to face one another shortly afterwards at the Under-20 World Cup, the seniors of Venezuela and the USA played to a draw that the South Americans may come away happier with.

Indeed, fielding an XI featuring just two or three players who, based on recent encounters, could be described as regulars, they initially found themselves on the backfoot. In these opening exchanges, they were content to sit back and wait for potential counter-attacking opportunities as the Americans got forward. However, their CONCACAF opponents, in turn, were unable to really test goalkeeper José Contreras, instead only being able to cause some mild fright amongst the backline. To give the first of a few examples, in the 14th minute the creative Fabian Johnson appeared to have an opening on the edge of the area and thus played a neat through-ball towards Clint Dempsey, though this narrowly evaded the Seattle Sounders striker. Three minutes later, from a similarly promising position inside the area, Dempsey was unable to finish off a decent chipped forward ball, with centre-back Sema Velázquez instead getting in a foot to divert the ball towards Contreras. Then, shortly afterwards in the 19th minute, wonderboy Christian Pulisic received a cut back on the inside-left of the area, though his shot was always rising and went a few yards over.

Throughout all of this, Venezuela managed to get forward a couple of times, Darwin Machís’ 10th-minute stepover and blasted low cross being perhaps their most significant moment. That said, when they scored in the 29th minute, it was certainly against the run of play. This goal came as Junior Moreno’s corner was knocked back out towards him only for his header to send the ball straight back into the goalmouth where centre-back Velázquez instinctively stretched out a high leg to hi-yah the ball home for 1-0.

Subsequently, Venezuela had a couple more opportunities with impressive international debutant Moreno involved in both. The 23-year-old Zulia midfielder has some footballing pedigree as his father Carlos Horacio Moreno briefly managed the national side in 1989 (and was also sadly caught up in the nation’s seemingly never-ending cycle of violence late last year when he was shot – albeit thankfully not fatally). Here, in the 33rd minute, Moreno Jr. did well to find some space and strike a fine swerving right-footed shot from 30 yards, which required a good low save from goalkeeper Tim Howard. From the subsequent corner, Moreno’s ball was headed on and reached left-back Rubert Quijada, whose nodded effort was well-gloved by Howard onto the post.

Upon half-time, the USA – who wore shirts with rainbow-coloured numbers to show their support for the LBGTQ community – had to confront the fact that for all their early possession, they had encountered a well-organised makeshift Venezuela and would need to find more effective ways of breaking them down.

Three minutes after the restart, they had a half-chance when Dempsey rose well to a cross from the left, yet headed slightly wide of the near post. Up the other end in the 55th minute, Christian Santos was to curl an effort not too far over from the edge of the area, though six minutes later, his side were to be pegged back. Indeed, just after the hour-mark, Borussia Dortmund starlet Pulisic did well to evade a challenge on the inside-left before striking low with his left boot across goal and past the despairing dive of Contreras. 1-1.

The remaining half-hour was rather short on clear opportunities and/or any real rhythm as both teams struck a blow against competitive action by making six substitutions each. One of these, Venezuela’s Jefferson Savarino, was making his debut in front of the fans of his new club Real Salt Lake and, in the 74th minute just two minutes after coming on, impressively roamed into space. He got into a good position on the inside-right and played a decent chipped ball forward, though the otherwise quiet Salomón Rondón was unable to control this.

The USA, on the other hand, caused a minor scare when Michael Bradley’s 80th-minute low ball upfield had to be cleared by the onrushing Contreras and, at the death, had another moment of note when Omar González headed a couple of yards wide from a corner.

Overall, acting manager Marcos Mathías as well as the South Korea-residing Rafael Dudamel must be pleased with this outcome, particularly the defensive solidity and organisation that their men displayed, not to mention the attacking threat of Moreno. Unsurprisingly given the nature of the match, its timing as well as the mutual unfamiliarity of so many in the Vinotinto shirts, it was far from a classic, but if they can put in a similar shift on Thursday, then it will surely be considered a worthwhile journey.

Team Selections

USA (4-1-3-2): T. Howard; D. Yedlin (G. Zusi, 90+1′), G. Cameron (O. González, 46′), J. Brooks (M. Hedges, 56′), J. Villafaña; M. Bradley; F. Johnson (T. Ream, 63′), C. Pulisic, D. Nagbe (J. Morris, 70′); B. Wood, C. Dempsey (K. Acosta, 63′).

Venezuela (4-4-2): J. Contreras; P. Camacho, S. Velázquez (Y. Osorio, 56′), M. Villanueva, R. Quijada; J. Murillo (J. Vargas, 89′), J. Moreno (F. La Mantía, 83′), F. Flores, D. Machís (A. Romero, 67′);  S. Rondón (A. Ponce, 90+3′) & C. Santos (J. Savarino, 72′).

The second game of Venezuela’s American trip is on Thursday 8 June 2017 against Ecuador. For live updates on this match, please follow @DarrenSpherical and, for a full report with video highlights, do consider returning to Hispanospherical.com a day or so after the full-time whistle.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – June 2017 Preview

At the end of April, two friendlies were announced to aid La Vinotinto‘s preparations for a more prosperous future, though now in early June, most Venezuelan minds are focused elsewhere. Here, the beleaguered @DarrenSpherical takes a quick look at the squad preparing to face the USA and Ecuador…

International Friendlies

Saturday 3 June 2017 – Rio Tinto Stadium, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

USA vs Venezuela

Thursday 8 June 2017 – FAU Stadium, Boca Ratón, Florida

Ecuador vs Venezuela

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Venezuela assistant manager, Marcos Mathías (GettyImages)

Places Up For Grabs in the States

Since La Vinotinto‘s last pair of disappointing outings in March, the FVF have managed to cobble together two warm-up games before the team concludes their depressing World Cup Qualifying campaign later this year.

However, coach Rafael Dudamel will not be overseeing these two America-based encounters as he is currently in South Korea where he has led his remarkable Under-20 squad to the Quarter-finals of the World Cup. Indeed, the head-turning Sub-20 side have won all four of their games without conceding a goal and their do-or-die clash with USA’s youngsters shall commence barely two hours after the seniors of both nations have duked it out in Salt Lake City.

Thus, assistant manager Marcos Mathías will instead be leading this still-rather-youthful 27-man squad into battle in the States and will have to make do without the likes of Wuilker Faríñez, Yangel Herrera, Adalberto Peñaranda and Yeferson Soteldo. At least three, if not all, of these players – as well as some others currently in South Korea – have strong chances of being regulars in a future rebuilt Venezuela on the road to Qatar 2022 and there are several, more senior, players who have also not made the trip.

Most significantly, the captain Tomás Rincón will be somewhat preoccupied with the small matter of the Cardiff-hosted Champions League Final which his Juventus will contest against Real Madrid. One wonders how many Venezuelans will have the stamina to watch this game, plus the first senior friendly some five hours later and then the Under-20 knock-out tie.

There are again no places in the squad for the Málaga pair of Juanpi and Roberto Rosales. Regarding the former, who has recently been spotted in his home country participating in political demonstrations, he has had an injury-plagued 2017 though when he recuperates he will surely be welcomed back to the fold with open arms. However, this is something that is difficult to assert regarding Rosales – who has also made his anti-government sentiments known – as, though he is currently also carrying a knock, he was also surprisingly left out of March’s World Cup Qualifying double-header despite being fully fit.

Another absentee is forward Josef Martínez (Atalanta United), who was injured against Peru three months ago and has yet to resurface on a professional pitch – though he is apparently knocking on the door for a return at club level. Otherwise, as he was in March, goalkeeper Dani Hernández is again left out, though this is probably due to him still being involved in Tenerife’s vital promotion push. Also, possibly owing to some poor performances for the national team, there is no place for Terek Grozny’s Wilker Ángel.

One says “probably” and “possibly” because there has not been a great deal of press coverage for these two games, with Mathías/Dudamel’s plans shrouded in secrecy and/or a yawning cloud of indifference.

Still, what can be said is that there is a surprise return to the squad for Alain Baroja (Sud América, Uruguay, on loan from Cádiz CF, Spain) who, some two years ago had looked as if he could be Venezuela’s number one goalkeeper for the long haul yet, after some galling errors, was banished into international exile. This is his first-ever call-up in Dudamel’s 14-month reign.

There are also a fair few players in this squad who ply their trade in the domestic league, such as striker Edder Farías, who has scored 22 times in his last 37 league matches for Caracas FC. It would be greatly beneficial for Venezuela to have more options up top for when Martínez and/or West Brom’s Salomón Rondón – who has also been included – are unavailable. Farías could well provide one possible alternative though another possibility is 20-year-old Jefferson Savarino, a more versatile forward/attacking-midfielder, who was banging in the goals for Zulia until recently moving on loan to the MLS with Real Salt Lake. Who knows, for the USA game at the Rio Tinto Stadium, there may even be a few locals in the stands on hand to give him a wave, if not a cheer.

Otherwise, one can not help but feel these games are good opportunities for some of the more experienced-yet-still-relatively-young individuals to further entrench themselves in the coaching staff’s thinking following their appearances in March’s qualifiers. Perhaps chief amongst this crop are the likes of attacking-midfielders Darwin Machís (Leganés, on loan from Granada, Spain), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, on loan from Benfica, Portugal) and Rómulo Otero** (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil on loan from Huachipato, Chile).

Ultimately, though one is not anticipating a vintage set of clashes on American soil, with almost every first-team place seemingly up for grabs – barring Rincón’s and Rondón’s – these are undoubtedly good chances for these players to make it hard for Dudamel, Mathías and co. to overlook them come August.

To keep up-to-date with these two friendly encounters, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match reports and highlights.

Venezuela Squad

Goalkeepers

Alain Baroja (Sud América, Uruguay, on loan from Cádiz CF, Spain) & José Contreras (Deportivo Táchira).

Defenders

Pablo Camacho (Deportivo Táchira), Jhon Chancellor (Delfín, Ecuador), Rolf Feltscher (Real Zaragoza, on loan from Getafe, Spain), Alexander González (Huesca, Spain), José Luis Marrufo (Mineros de Guayana), Yordan Osorio (Tondela, Portugal), Rubert Quijada (Caracas FC), Jefre Vargas (Arouca, Portugal, on loan from Caracas), José Manuel “Sema” Velázquez (Arouca, Portugal) &  Mikel Villanueva (Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Arquímedes Figuera (Universitario, Peru), Francisco Flores (Mineros de Guayana), Alejandro Guerra (Palmeiras, Brazil), Jacobo Kouffati (Millonarios, Colombia), Francisco La Mantía (Deportivo La Guaira), Darwin Machís (Leganés, on loan from Granada, Spain), Júnior Moreno (Zulia FC), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, on loan from Benfica, Portugal), Rómulo Otero (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil, on loan from Huachipato, Chile), Aristóteles Romero (Mineros de Guayana) & Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA, on loan from Zulia).

Forwards

Edder Farías (Caracas FC), Andrés Ponce (Lugano, Switzerland, on loan from Sampdoria, Italy), Salomón Rondón (West Bromwich Albion, England) & Christian Santos (Deportivo Alavés, Spain).

**Please note that, according to renowned journalist Juan Sifontes, the following players will not be available for the clash vs USA: Alexander González, Jhon Chancellor, Rolf Feltscher, Arquímedes Figuera, Alejandro Guerra, Jacobo Kouffati and Rómulo Otero.

venezuelasquadjune2017

(Source: @SeleVinotinto)

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Ecuador 3-3 USA (Group F, 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, 22 May 2017)

Ecuador’s opening Group F game of the 2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup saw them get off to a brilliant start yet were ultimately denied all three points at the very end by an irrepressible USA. Below are video highlights, a brief summary of the match and, most importantly, @DarrenSphericals armchair talent-tracking…

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(Source: Wikipedia – Check here for all other results, fixtures and standings)

Ecuador 3-3 USA

2017 FIFA Under-20 World Cup, Group F, 22 May 2017 (YouTube)

Javier Rodríguez’s men were fast out of the traps yet were to be prevented at the death of claiming three points in this entertaining inauguration of Group F. They were 2-0 up within seven minutes as first Herlín Lino slotted into the net following some good flank-work from Washington Corozo then, two minutes later, Bryan Cabezas did great to worm away from a defender before firing home. However, in this rather open encounter, opportunities never seemed too far away and, though the Americans at times struggled with the Ecuadorians’ physicality and pace, they did gradually regroup. In the 36th minute, they halved the deficit as the impressive Luca de la Torre of Fulham roamed forward in the centre, laying the ball to 17-year-old Josh Sargent, who struck low into the back of the net.

Buoyed by this, USA stepped things up and, nine minutes after the restart, got their equaliser when Sargent notched his second, a close-range header which greeted a fine ball from Brooks Lennon on the right. However, their South American opponents were not primed to roll over for the inevitable, insteading persevering to make their presence felt. That said, when they regained the lead on 64 minutes, they received more than a bit of help from goalkeeper Jonathan Klinsmann (yes, son of Jürgen, who was in the stands). He had previously made a fine close-range stop but here, he dilly-dallied on a pass back and, under pressure, could only knock it straight out to Cabezas, who was able to place it past him. Subsequently, the game did not have as many clear-cut opportunities and it looked as if La Mini Tri were going to clinch a victory. However, in the fourth minute of stoppage-time, another testing cross from Lennon was poorly dealt with by an Ecuador defender, who headed it directly into the path of de la Torre. His low strike thus ended the affair all square.

Talent Tracking

ecuadorflag Ecuador

As they did on home soil during the qualifying campaign, the yellow-and-blue boys showed that they have an array of speedy and strong attackers at their disposal. Indeed, early on, Washington Corozo (No. 7, Independiente Del Valle) made a vital contribution when he gave a demonstration of his pace, bursting past a defender into the area, then nudging it away from the oncoming Klinsmann at the crucial moment. This cut-back left Herlín Lino (No. 9, Deportivo Cuenca) with a virtually unguarded goal to strike into for the fifth-minute opener. Later on in the 56th minute Lino had a good chance to double his tally when he was spotted by the central Wilter Ayoví (No. 8, Independiente Del Valle) – who quietly impressed earlier this year and was given a start here – but the shot was well blocked by Klinsmann.

Lino looked rather alert but Ecuador’s main man was again their topscorer in qualifying, left-sided forward Bryan Cabezas (No. 10, Atalanta), who netted twice. His first goal, which came after seven minutes, allowed him to show off his attributes with quick-fire aplomb. This arrived following a pass from midfielder Jhonny Quiñónez (No. 16, Norte América), who was a somewhat curious inclusion in the line-up as he wasn’t in the qualifying squad and hasn’t actually made any club appearances this year. From this, Cabezas controlled with his left, before a rapid stepover and another touch gave him the space he needed to rifle home inside the area. In the second half, the attacker who impressed with Cinderella story Independiente Del Valle in last year’s Copa Libertadores doubled his account after the pressure Joao Rojas (No. 17, Emelec) put Klinsmann under was evidently too much for the goalkeeper to handle, with his shaky clearance falling to the feet of the wrong man. This gift was thus comfortably dispatched to make it 3-2, allowing Cabezas to announce himself as the tournament’s joint-top scorer with Sargent.

Otherwise, though it was a strong performance in the final third, it seems that the defence is still every bit the liability that it was in qualifying. Indeed, though left-back Pervis Estupiñán (No. 6, Granada, Spain) is very much a prospect going forward, he again provided evidence that his defensive work and/or communication can be somewhat suspect. It may be debatable how much precisely he was at fault – those to his right as well as in front are certainly also culpable to varying degrees – but the bald facts are that the first goal involved a pass going between him and the centre-backs and the last two were the result of crosses from his flank. On each, he was not even close to the danger men and Lennon, in particular, had much joy throughout the second half spraying in balls from his side. Perhaps those in front who sometimes covered for him following his upfield gallivanting were also guilty and the last goal was certainly more the fault of the defender who, instead of clearing, headed the ball directly to de la Torre. All the same, the entire back line as well as the defensive-midfielders who occasionally allowed the USA to roam centrally really need to tighten things up at the back if Ecuador are to make any serious inroads at this tournament.

In the other Group F game played today, Senegal won 2-0 against Saudi Arabia, who will be Ecuador’s next opponents on Thursday 25 May 2017.

To keep up-to-date with the latest news on the South American nations at South Korea 2017, please follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and check back to Hispanospherical.com for match-by-match talent-tracking articles.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Q & A with David Freeman, Author of Barra Brava (A Latin American Football Journey)

Having recently finished reading Barra Brava, David Freeman’s envy-inducing account of his 18-month journey amongst a diverse range of Latin American football fans, Hispanospherical.com has been fortunate to be able to talk to the author. Following on from an introduction to his book, this extensive Q & A should be essential reading for anyone who has ever contemplated embarking upon a similar adventure.   

colombia4top

Game 18: Itagüí Ditaires (now Águilas Doradas) 4-0 Atlético Nacional, Copa Colombia Quarter Final First Leg, Estadio Atanasio Girardot, Medellin, Antioquia Department, Colombia, 15 September 2010. One of 67 games David Freeman attended in the Americas.

David Freeman’s Barra Brava is sold in paperback and/or Kindle format through Amazon’s many location-specific websites. To purchase a copy, click whichever link is most relevant to you: UK/Ireland, USA, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Brazil and Spain

Barra Brava: An Introduction

In the collective consciousness of most football fans outside of its vibrant orbit, Latin America is somewhat of a dichotomy. While it may harbour a tantalising cocktail of innovative skills and irrepressible passion, it is nevertheless very much on the periphery of the global footballing mainstream. Although hundreds of its exports to Europe’s opulent centre-stage regularly provide incalculable instances of the substantial reservoirs of talent that this vast region consistently produces, the awareness of the footballing cultures from whence they came leaves something to be desired. Indeed, the clubs, supporters and environments that initially helped to nurture many of these cracks exist in many imaginations as little more than a combination of crude, often unflattering stereotypes, as well as names – the latter of which are diminishing in stature with each passing year.

As the exodus of native talent shows no sign of abating and kick-off times in this area for spectators in the Old Continent tend to be either anti-social or clash with top-flight European matches, none of these leagues appear well-placed to redress this situation. Nevertheless, for many, the curiosity will always linger. After all, having witnessed the 2014 Brazil World Cup, in which several Latin American nations were well-represented in both the stands as well as on the pitches, how many fans idly daydreamed about experiencing some of these atmospheres first-hand?

Well, one man who has already done just that and on a scale that is surely the envy of football fans and cultural tourists the world over, is David Freeman. His book, Barra Brava, is an absorbing travelogue, chronicling an 18-month journey that began in October 2009. Starting off with a brief Latin-tinged spell in the United States watching the now-defunct Chivas USA, he then crossed the language-barrier to experience many of the sights, sounds and sensations of Latin America, culminating with one final linguistic hurdle in Brazil where the fun ended in April 2011. Along the way, he visited 18 different countries, watching no less than 67 live matches in 15 of them. With so much ground covered, Freeman was able to experience the footballing cultures of not only some of the area’s heavyweights, such as Argentina and Mexico, but also those of nations that most people would struggle to name a single international player from (Guatemala and Nicaragua, anyone?).

Bringing a modicum of order to complement the roaming devil-may-care spirit that often pervaded his travels, Freeman made it his mission to mix with as many local supporters as he encountered. With his accompanying England flag conspicuously signposting him as a figure of curiosity in the stands, he was able to use his ever-developing Spanish skills to learn about many varied fan groups, their matchday rituals and relationships with their clubs. Subsequently in print, he displays an admirable levelling of the playing field, relaying his experiences of the barra bravas of the likes of Boca Juniors, Santos and Club América in a similar manner to those of Motagua (Honduras), Deportivo Saprissa (Costa Rica) and Blooming (Bolivia).

Wherever he turned up, there were always songs, gestures and/or dances to first decode and then perhaps, when enough of his beverage of choice had been consumed, join in with. Yet, as readers will discover, it was not always to be plain sailing, with the tensions in the stands sometimes escalating into atmospheres markedly less hospitable towards this Englishman. Indeed, from finding himself on an Argentine pitch being booed by supporters less-than-impressed with his flag to requiring police intervention to restrain a knife-wielding Colombian youth, Freeman’s recollections often serve to caution, as much as to inspire, the prospective traveller.

Away from the stadiums, his explorations of a rather breathtaking range of locations were no less colourful, with every other page flowing with anecdotes and evocative descriptions. A rich diversity of experiences was evidently had, not least during a lengthy spell at a Mexican hotel situated by a nudist beach as well as, conversely, when teaching English in the poverty-stricken Nicaraguan capital of Managua, where he participated in some controversy-mired Independence Day celebrations. Furthermore, some of his more inquisitive forays included visits to the Mayan ruins in Central America, the idiosyncratic capitals of Panama City, Bogotá and La Paz, as well as the topological treasures of the Calchaquí Valleys in north-west Argentina.

As can be expected, invaluable nuggets of practical advice are scattered throughout this book, rendering it an essential primer for anyone thinking of embarking on a journey that encompasses even a fraction of the ground covered here. Freeman regularly takes into consideration such readers, particularly when providing what amounts to a mini-dictionary of Spanish words and phrases at the beginning of each chapter that can be used to ingratiate oneself with the locals.

So, if you like the sound of going on such a trip yourself or would simply like to read the adventures of someone who did, be sure to check out this book, the most latest edition of which has just been published. If, however, before making such an investment, you would prefer to know a little more, then as well as perusing the promotional website, please read on as Señor Freeman has recently been kind enough to answer some questions in detail, providing a considerable idea of what Barra Brava is all about.

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Q & A with David Freeman, author of Barra Brava

[Darren Spherical] Hello David, thank you for agreeing to answer some questions (and for providing so many photographs!). Your book provides countless entertaining vignettes and fascinating insights into various footballing cultures and societies in the Americas.

Prior to beginning your adventure, you mention that you worked for an internet bank and had not done a great deal of travelling. What motivated you to sell your house to embark on such an extensive and, at times, daunting journey? Also, why Latin America?

[David Freeman] My short answer is that I’d been bitten by the travel bug when I went to Australia and seven years on I needed to scratch the itch. The timing was all about personal circumstances, having been promised redundancy and not having responsibilities such as kids to worry about. Latin America was chosen based on learning Spanish and being able to communicate throughout two continents.

Regarding the book’s title, on your travels you met dozens of different groups of fans from over a dozen Latin American countries. Based on your observations, could you give an introduction to the barra bravas? How did they differ in some of the nations you visited?

I’d describe the barra as universally passionate people who support their club in a noisy, colourful and fanatical way. In my experience, barra bravas are not the same as hooligans because clubs like Pumas (Mexico) and LDU Quito (Ecuador) are supported by civilised, friendly students who had no interest in violence, but instead created atmospheres to compete with the most fervent in the world. Whilst I tried not to get involved in the seedy sides of any barra that I encountered, there could be no doubt that in certain places (mainly Colombia and Argentina) they were a public menace whose activities resulted in people dying every year.

At each ground you entered, you tried to get a photograph of yourself with your flag (an English St. George’s Cross emblazoned with the name of Birmingham City’s Zulu Army firm). How did you feel in such situations? Regarding some of the more negative responses, you must have feared for your own safety at times? 

A gringo waving a flag around always attracted attention from the locals but I found the majority to be friendly, particularly as I spoke Spanish and it was clear that I was as crazy about football as they were. In some places it was really intimidating waving a piece of cloth around that advertised that you were a vulnerable foreigner, but it proved to be a great ice-breaker amongst curious strangers. The numerous positive experiences with my St. George’s cross far outweighed an occasional negative one – plus the volatile situations made for the best stories!

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To see dozens more photographs of David with his flag at stadiums, click here.

Could you give any advice to future football tourists who wish to experience some of the colourful and raucous Latin American atmospheres without getting embroiled in any trouble? 

Simple: go in the main stand. At every ground I visited there was a tranquilo section that charged around twice as much to enter than the ‘popular’ terrace. This more expensive seating area had a far better view, superior facilities, good stewarding and was populated by reasonable people. If, however, you insist on mixing it up, I would repeat the point about being able to communicate with the natives and, above all, be wary of everything!

With regard to fan culture (pre-match rituals, songs/chants, dances, paraphernalia etc.), what were some of the most memorable things you observed and/or joined in with on your travels? 

Personally, I found the friendly beer-drinking culture whilst watching games in Mexico, Central America and Ecuador enjoyable. More universally, the fans consistently bouncing and singing, always admirably supported by musical instruments. Every club had at least one drummer, some even had horn sections (see this video compilation for some of the highlights of fans I encountered). Also, the socialising during play, aided by the open terraces, which is something that has been lost in the UK. This is in contrast to Germany, which is the leading nation in Europe with regard to atmosphere at domestic fixtures, driven by their affordable safe standing sections.

Moving away from the stands and onto the pitches, you saw many well-known players, some of whom were winding down their careers after spells in Europe and others who were emerging and have since gone on to play in the Premier League, La Liga, Bundesliga, Serie A and elsewhere. Who were you most excited to see and who left the most lasting impressions on you?

Juan Manuel Iturbe impressed me most as a 17 year old turning a match at the 2011 South American Youth Championship in Argentina’s favour against Chile. He made some stunning appearances in the Copa Libertadores before impressing for Hellas Verona and now finds himself at Roma.

Of the big players I watched live more than once:

Neymar won the Libertadores with Santos in 2011 scoring crucial goals throughout, although showcasing his ample array of skills and tricks at that level did not always benefit the team.

Juan Sebastián Verón’s passing at Estudiantes was masterful in Argentina’s Primera División.

Salvador Cabañas looked a class act for América in Mexico’s top-flight, though this was of course before he was tragically shot by a drug dealer.

Indeed, understandably he was never the same afterwards. Staying with on-field matters, what were some of the most memorable games and goals you saw?

The Clásicos were always the best value for money atmosphere-wise; the derbies in Mexico (Pumas 3-2 América, Game 3) and Colombia (Deportivo Cali 6-3 América de Cali, Game 24) lived up to the hype on the pitch. My favourite was bouncing among Universidad Católica’s fans in Buenos Aires as the Chileans scored three goals in the last 20 minutes to record a 4-3 Libertadores group stage victory away at Vélez Sarsfield (Game 51). There were also many dull games where la barra provided the entertainment.

Just under a quarter of the games you watched were in the North/Central American (CONCACAF) region, often in countries which many football fans will not have considered visiting. What did you make of the play, supporters and stadiums in this area?

Central America’s population were as passionate about football as those in the southern continent. Yet though, for example, Los Ticos defied the odds to reach 2014’s World Cup Quarter Finals, football in Central America was markedly inferior to the South American game. Though considered part of the North, Mexico was the region’s domestic powerhouse, aided in part in being alone in having some of its teams compete in the most prestigious club tournament in the Americas, the Copa Libertadores. Whilst the CONCACAF Champions League wasn’t a particularly competitive tournament, it did throw up some interesting ties, sending high-profile MLS sides and former European legends to remote places such as El Salvador. In my experience, the rural locations were really friendly and the atmospheres were brilliant, even at a Nicaraguan league final held in a baseball park.

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Football-related photographs from Central America (Click to Enlarge)

Outside of the stadiums in this area, you seemed to have rather diverse experiences, from the fun of Mexico to the comparative austerity of Nicaragua. Which places would you recommend to visitors to this region? 

Most visitors to this part of the world head to Cancún (Mexico) or Costa Rica, and the tourist industry outside of these places is still developing. I found every country to be fascinating and despite not receiving as many visitors, each had some fairly well-established attractions. These were mainly based around coasts, lakes, mountains and Aztec or Mayan historical sites. Panama City was one of the oddest capitals I’ve seen and there was an amazing sunset pretty much anywhere along the Pacific coast. Nicaragua would be my suggestion if you want to escape reality and don’t mind a chaotically relaxed experience. Compared to South, Central America is far cheaper on the ground and much less ‘discovered’, although air fares can be expensive.

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Photographs from North/Central America (Click to Enlarge)

You watched 18 games in Buenos Aires (and 20 in Argentina altogether) in little over five weeks. As this is a footballing Mecca, what advice can you impart to anyone wishing to visit this city with similar intentions? 

Where possible, I would suggest buying your ticket in advance. Also, when I was there, the home fans were generally retained in the ground for 40 minutes after the final whistle, so going in the away end was preferable. However, as visiting fans have since been banned due to repeated problems with fan violence, there may be a wait before this advice can be put into practice again. Nevertheless, also make sure you use public transport to your advantage. From Central BA the train is best for Vélez, All Boys, Quilmes, Arsenal de Sarandí, Lanús and Argentinos Juniors; the Metro is convenient for River, San Lorenzo, Huracán and Atlanta; whilst the bus is quickest when visiting Boca, Racing and Independiente. Also, if you have the time and inclination, go to a smaller club in addition to Boca or River, as they can be far cheaper, friendlier and almost as spectacular. Finally, be wary of the alcohol exclusion zones around stadiums in Buenos Aires.

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Football-related photographs from Buenos Aires Province, Argentina (Click to Enlarge)

Outside of Argentina, but remaining in South America, what were some of your highlights watching football in this particular continent? 

Colombia had the most edgy and memorable atmospheres. Ecuador was the friendliest, although my opinion is aided by the fact that they served beer in the grounds, plus Guayaquil and Quito were unexpectedly vibrant football cities. Asunción (Paraguay) was a little gem in the middle of nowhere which had a wonderful history. Iquique (Chile) had the best band I saw, complemented by a full brass section.

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Football-related photographs from South America (Click to Enlarge)

Again, away from the football, what would you recommend to future visitors to the nations you travelled to in South America? 

Salar de Uyuni (Bolivia) was the most spectacular natural wonder I have ever seen and certainly guarantees some amazing photos. Generally speaking, Bolivia was cheap, friendly and diverse, with lots of unique tourist opportunities. Ecuador had easily accessible sights and offered the possibility of cycling from the Andes to the Amazon in a day. Colombia had rugged scenery as well as an attractive and cool population, although its reputation discourages many people. North-west Argentina’s vineyards and mountains were very pleasant and buzzing in the January I was there, as that is when many in Buenos Aires escape to the countryside.

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 Photographs from South America (Click to Enlarge)

On the subject of buying match tickets, it seemed that for the most part you showed up on matchdays without having pre-purchased them and yet, irrespective of what barriers you initially encountered, still managed to get in. As you appear to have acquired much know-how in this area, what advice can you impart?

Generally, I would advise showing up a couple of hours in advance, at which point you should be able to make a purchase and spend some time among the locals – most will be delighted that a gringo has chosen to watch their club. Face value prices were cheap – generally $5-10 in Central and South America, $10-12.50 in Argentina, whilst Brazil could cost as much as it does in the English Premier League. If you aren’t able to purchase a ticket in advance then touts are ever-present, although at the big Argentinian clubs you may have to pay tourist rates, which includes transport to the match (approximately $100 in 2011). Oddly, to watch Universitario in Lima – visit your local supermarket!

What were the most value-for-money places to live and/or watch football in? 

Buenos Aires is probably the world’s most exciting city to watch football in, and although accommodation isn’t cheap, public transport, food, drink and entrance fees are generally very reasonable – something I believe has continued as the Peso weakened in late 2014. Ecuador was probably best value in South America for watching top-level football, whilst accommodation and living in Central America was noticeably cheap. Conversely, Chile and Brazil were more expensive than the other countries I watched matches in.

While there was clearly much to be enjoyed on your journey, readers will discover that it was not always fun and games. Based on your experiences, if you wished to put someone off embarking on a similar adventure, what would you say to them?

Unless you go to a resort, Latin America isn’t somewhere that you can just turn up to without any preparation and then expect to have a great tourist experience. Considerations need to be made for the language barrier (hardly anyone speaks good English), the heat, the altitude and the distances you will be travelling within a limited transport network. If you like things going according to plan then this certainly isn’t your ideal destination, as nothing runs like clockwork. Also, it is important to accept that the locals will assume that you are rich and therefore you are likely to be a target. Although in my experience overcharging was the only real annoyance, I met many people who were robbed and subjected to violence, particularly in the big centres such as Lima and Quito. Peru, Colombia and Nicaragua’s capital, Managua, seemed to be the most dangerous places, but it is all subjective.

What is your interest in Latin American football like these days? Do you look out for any teams in particular? Finally, on a related note, what have you been up to since returning from your travels?

I have been following Latin American results on Soccerway, particularly Argentinos Juniors’ return to a reformed 30-team Primera División and Vasco da Gama battling back into Brazil’s top-flight. Also, although I feel there could be a lot more exposure on British TV, I have been enjoying this year’s Copa Libertadores on Premier Sports and will certainly also be watching the Copa América on the channel and/or YouTube – whichever is most convenient. On a personal note, in the past three years between working for a bank and marrying my Brazilian girlfriend, I’ve spent much of my free time writing and editing the book. The first edition totalled almost 120k words, though thankfully the latest version has been whittled down to 103k – apologies to anyone who bought a copy a couple of years ago! Ultimately, while it may not be perfect, I believe it is a decent travelogue.

David, thank you for giving up so much of your time to answer these questions and providing a taste of your experiences. Again, readers, if you would like to purchase Barra Brava in either paperback or Kindle format, click on whichever link is most relevant to your location: UK/Ireland, USA, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Brazil and Spain

If you have any questions for David Freeman, feel free to either reply to this article with them or, if you fancy the more direct option, he can be reached on Twitter under the account @TheBlueBarra

More From the Author

While Barra Brava is David Freeman’s first book, he has also written these articles on Latin American football, which may be of interest:

Fútbol in a Baseball Park, In Bed With Maradona, 15 February 2013. A detailed feature on the standard and status of football in Nicaragua, partially informed by his experiences of living there for four months as an English teacher.

Latin American Football 2012 in Review, Talking Sports, 2 January 2013. Covering the year following his travels, here is a summary of who won what in Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, and Mexico.

My Trip to Brazil: A Year of Expectation, Football Friends Online, 17 June 2014. Craftily combining a pre-World Cup trip to meet his Brazilian girlfriend’s family with a football detour or three, Freeman visited the Mineirão, Estádio Independência and, of course, the Maracanã.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Article originally published on 6 June 2015.

Venezuelans Abroad in the USA – Recap of the Past Week

United States of America

Saturday 30 August 2014

Major League Soccer

Montreal Impact 2-0 Columbus Crew

Bernardo Añor missed his fifth consecutive game due to a left hamstring strain which he is reported to be gradually recovering from. His team-mates were defeated by the first two goals in the MLS career of Ignacio Piatti, an Argentine forward who has recently been acquired from San Lorenzo, a side he helped to reach their first ever Copa Libertadores final but who, to the chagrin of their fans, he was obliged to leave before the second leg of this tie could be played due to the MLS transfer window closing (San Lorenzo won in any event). His first goal after 40 minutes showed precisely why he is a Designated Player as he ran up the inside-left from the half-way line, made fools of two defenders with a cutback or two and then unleashed a fearsome left-footed drive that beat goalkeeper Steve Clark with its sheer pace. A dream goal to open your account for any team but not one many people would have wished to be accompanied by The Fratellis’s ‘Chelsea Dagger’ playing over the PA system. His second goal came deep into stoppage time and was the culmination of a charge towards the centre of the box by the 38 year-old Italian Marco Di Vaio, who attempted to turn a defender one way and then the other but an opposition foot diverted the ball into the path of Piatti, who quickly manoeuvred himself into a more advantageous position away from a defender and emphatically struck the ball into the roof of the net.

Despite this defeat, the Crew are still in the play-off places of the Eastern Conference but, having played a game or two more than some of their nearest rivals, will need to improve their form in the remaining nine games of the regular season. 

Wednesday 3 September 2014

Unofficial ‘Scrimmage’ Match

Columbus Crew XI 5-1 Dayton Dutch Lions

The Crew played a match against their affiliate side from the third-tier USL Pro league at their training facility in the Ohioan village of Obetz which only members of the media were permitted to attend. The game gave them an opportunity to field some squad members, youth players and those who have been struggling with injuries, such as Bernardo Añor, who started the game and played all of the first half. Little is known of his performance but he appears to be edging closer to a first-team return and will hopefully play an integral role in his side’s play-off push. As for the goals, Ben Speas got two and Manchester City fans may be interested to hear that their promising 17 year-old Kelechi Iheanacho – a man who is training with the Crew and who netted six times for his victorious country at the 2013 FIFA Under-17 World Cup, celebrating each one with WWE wrestler Daniel Bryan’s ‘YES’ chant – scored a hat-trick.