Tag Archives: Willian

Venezuela 0-2 Brazil – CONMEBOL Qualification Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (11 October 2016)

Rather than historic headlines, the tenth matchday of La Vinotinto’s 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign yielded goalkeeping and power failures. Here, Hispanospherical.com provides a full match report…

CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018

Tuesday 11 October 2016 – El Estadio Metropolitano de Mérida, Mérida State

Venezuela 0-2 Brazil

Video Highlights of Venezuela 0-2 Brazil, 11 October 2016, CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (YouTube)

Oh Dani Boy, Gifting the Night Away

Match Report

Within eight minutes, Venezuela were knocked down and rarely looked like getting up again as Brazil went on to inflict upon them their eighth defeat in ten World Cup Qualifying games.

Making five changes from the Uruguay defeat (including three of the four defenders), Rafael Dudamel set up his men in a relatively bold 4-4-2 formation but no strategy or set of tactics could have accounted for the opening goal. This arrived when goalkeeper Dani Hernández, under no real pressure, suicidally passed the ball straight to Gabriel Jesus some 30 yards out. The Manchester-bound 19-year-old stopped the ball with his left boot and, as the Tenerife man scrambled in front of the penalty spot, with his right deftly scooped the Seleção into the lead with a masterful chip. Thus marked the latest instance of Venezuela’s tradition of providing significant aid to countries who don’t really need it.

Though it was his most glaring, this was hardly Hernández’s first error since regaining the gloves under Dudamel and pressure to make a change will surely intensify now. Yet with the two other goalkeepers in the squad relatively inexperienced at international level – and having not entirely convinced when called upon – there are no obvious alternatives. The previous number one Alain Baroja has been excluded from the selección throughout the new manager’s reign, seemingly due to having also committed some high-profile errors in earlier qualifying matches (the home games against Paraguay and Ecuador providing the most egregious examples). A recall can not now be entirely out of the question but, whatever happens, goalkeeping woes and back-line jitters look set to continue for the foreseeable future.

Conceding an early goal against one of the best teams in the continent would have deflated any nation but Venezuelans had additional reasons to fear the following 80+ minutes. Not only have they not won a single game in the current qualifying campaign, but – barring one friendly match in 2008 – they have never beaten Brazil and the last time that they gained a positive result from a competitive game after falling behind was exactly three years ago (their last match of the Brazil 2014 qualifying campaign, a 1-1 home draw with Paraguay on 11 October 2013).

In the remainder of the half, though Venezuela were not shrinking violets, it was certainly the visitors who came closest to getting the game’s second goal. In the 15th minute, Gabriel Jesus earned some space after he latched onto a long ball up the inside-left channel and slid it to Phillipe Coutinho, whose low strike from the edge of the dee was poked a bit too close to Hernández. Nine minutes later at the second attempt, roaming right-back Dani Alves volleyed in a goalmouth cross that was only narrowly diverted by Roberto Rosales from the path of Gabriel Jesus for a corner.

Just past the half-hour mark, Paulinho had a chance when he greatly unnerved the opposition back-line on the edge of the area, playing a few one-twos before eventually firing just wide. A few minutes later, it was Coutinho’s moment to strike a yard or two the wrong side of the post when an elevated ricochet in the area fell kindly for his right boot.

As with previous matches against the region’s heavyweights, the hosts’ best hope of an attempt on goal came from set-pieces (which here were flagged offside at the key moment) and breakaways, the impetus for which invariably derived from the feet of Adalberto Peñaranda. Indeed, the 19-year-old raised the volume in the stands in the 23rd minute when he left a player for dead in midfield before running into trouble. Later in the 41st minute, he impressively gained some space on the left before cutting inside and winning a corner from his own effort, though one or two of his colleagues seemed irritated that he did not pass for them to take aim.

Venezuela thus went into the break not completely out of the game, but having barely troubled opposition goalkeeper Alisson. Their struggle was compounded by the yellow cards earned by both centre-backs, Wilker Ángel and Sema Velázquez – not encouraging news for a team that has had three defenders (including Ángel) sent off in their last three games.

Nevertheless, as a spot of rain-lashing greeted the arrival of the second half, the hosts gained some heart from avoiding a repeat of the Uruguay game. No game-killing goals after 15 seconds here then. No, Tite’s men had to instead wait eight minutes for that. They doubled their lead thanks to Renato Agusto dragging the ball away from Rosales on the left and firing the ball across the goalmouth where Willian beat the other full-back Rolf Feltscher to clinically strike home at the back post.

Just five minutes later in the 58th minute, Brazil seemed well on their way to humiliating their hosts when an Augusto header from a corner ended up in the back of the net. However, Gabriel Jesus helped it across the line and his involvement caused the linesman to raise his flag.

Soon afterwards, partly inspired by the substitution of Alejandro Guerra on for Juanpi, Venezuela gradually overcame their dejection and started to threaten Alisson’s goal. Seconds after his arrival on the hour, it was the fresh Atlético Nacional midfielder who diverted a forward ball to Salomón Rondón. The West Bromwich forward’s first-time strike hit Marquinhos, seemingly on the upper arm, leaving Alisson stranded. Fortunately for the latter two, the ball went wide for a corner.

A couple of minutes later, Rondón had another chance. This time, from the right with his left boot, Rosales swung in a cross that the striker beat his marker to, with his header bouncing just a yard or so wide of the near post.

However, they were reminded of exactly what they were up against just a minute later when Brazil stretched their back-line and a pass from the left into the centre seemed to be heading for an inevitable third; yet the shot that followed was too close to Hernández, who parried.

The action continued and it was virtually end-to-end. Just two minutes later at the other end, Josef Martínez volleyed an arced free-kick that forced a save, though play was immediately halted for offside. Four minutes later, Alves skipped past the slide of Peñaranda on the right where he crossed towards the centre of the area to Paulinho but, despite the space the ex-Tottenham man had, he volleyed well over. Barely 30 seconds later at the other end, Rondón curled in a fine ball from the left with his right which destabilised and discombulated Filipe Luís. Prowling behind him at the back post was Guerra who did well to stretch to control the ball, but from his crab-like stance with Alisson narrowing the angles, he could only scuff a shot wide of the post.

However, pulses in the stands were not to be maintained at the same rate for much longer as in the 73rd minute, the floodlights suddenly went out. Darkness, punctuated by lights from phones and advertising boards, descended upon the Estadio Metropolitano de Mérida. There was initially much cheering and clapping from the home fans, perhaps proving Venezuelans like a good old ‘wheeeyyy’ when something goes wrong as much as anyone. Or maybe they just thought the game may get called off and they would receive a second chance. This was certainly debated by onlookers, with most agreeing a replay would have to be played the following night – sadly, such musings were not immediately relayed to a mid-kip Tony Pulis. Also during this interval, some fans began chanting for the removal of President Nicolás Maduro,  a fairly common occurrence when things are not going well at home (anti-government signs are also frequently seen at games on foreign soil). Last year towards the end of the 3-1 loss against Ecuador in Puerto Ordaz, similar chants were drowned out by music suddenly blasting out over the public announce system. This time in Mérida, however, no amount of pro-government officials would have been able to enforce similar action.

Fortunately for them though, there was little chance of a full-scale demonstration occurring as the electricity did gradually return and thus almost 25 minutes after the ball was last officially in play, the match resumed. Yet, in the remaining 17 minutes or so, little of note happened, with the interruption greatly diminishing the momentum of the players and the volume of the crowd. The one stand-out moment was Rondón’s 88th-minute header from a cross swung in from the right, which he powered towards Alisson, who was required to pull of a decent save to tip it over the bar.

Nevertheless, despite the hosts’ improvements after the second goal, when the Peruvian official blew for full-time, the Venezuelans were left to be confronted with their unenviable position at the bottom of the CONMEBOL Qualifying group. With Bolivia having picked up a point at home to Ecuador, Dudamel’s men now find themselves six points adrift at the bottom, with just two draws from ten games to their name.

After June’s promising Copa América campaign, the Vinotinto boss has now lost some of his initial goodwill, having presided over four qualifying games and earned just one point. Yet this worrying statistic is somewhat undermined by the fact that these matches were against four of the current top five teams in the region. However, with Venezuela’s next encounter being at home against those notoriously bad travellers Bolivia, nothing less than a victory will be enough to contain the critics for the time being. With changes to his already rather unsettled line-up inevitable, he may wish to spent the next month wisely while poring over his decisions.

To find out how Venezuela get on, remember to follow @DarrenSpherical on Twitter and/or check back here for match reports and news. 

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-4-2): D. Hernández; R. Rosales, S. Velázquez, W. Ángel, R. Feltscher; Juanpi (A. Guerra, 60′), T. Rincón,  A. Flores (Y. Herrera, 84′); A. Peñaranda (R. Otero, 73′); S. Rondón & J. Martínez.

Brazil (4-3-3): Alisson; D. Alves, Marquinhos, J. Miranda, F. Luís; Paulinho, Fernandinho, R. Augusto; Willian (Taison, 89′), G. Jesus, P. Coutinho (Giuliano, 83′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Brazil 3-1 Venezuela – CONMEBOL Qualification Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018 (13 October 2015)

Matchday 2 of La Vinotinto’s 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign brought the second loss to Noel Sanvicente’s charges. Here, Hispanospherical.com provides a match report and offers some thoughts on the game.

CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018

Tuesday 13 October 2015 –  Estádio Plácido Aderaldo Castelo, Fortaleza, Ceará.

Brazil 3-1 Venezuela 

Video Highlights of Brazil 3-1 Venezuela, CONMEBOL Qualifying Stage for FIFA World Cup 2018, 13 October 2015 (YouTube).

Seleção’s Superiority Self-Evident as Venezuela Leave Opening Round Point-Less

Match Report

The night may have begun with boos for Seleção boss Dunga but come the final whistle it was his opposite number Noel Sanvicente whose position had become the more precarious. Brazil, coming off the back of a 2-0 reversal against red-hot Chile, wasted little time trying to get back into their fans’ good books, asserting their superiority with less than 40 seconds on the clock. Luis Gustavo dispossessed Alejandro Guerra in the middle of the park, feeding Chelsea’s Willian who was granted plenty of time to drive into the area and then strike with evidently too much venom for Alain Baroja.

Venezuela initially responded well to this setback, getting forward and gaining some space in opposition territory. However, their hosts were to find that they could afford occasional minor defensive lapses as the visitors offered little from open play, something that could not be said of the likes of Willian, Douglas Costa and Oscar, as well as the wing-backs Dani Alves and Filipe Luis.

For the majority of the half, these players, as well as 35-year-old striker Ricardo Oliveira, largely tested the nerves of the Venezuelan backline more than the actual goal. However, they were to get their reward and go into the break with a scoreline that did justice to their dominance, as Willian doubled the lead in the 42nd minute. This time, Luis jinked past both Ronald Vargas and Roberto Rosales on the left, before pulling the ball back towards the edge of the area; Oscar dummied over it and the incoming Willian blasted home.

The ease with which they maintained the ball – tiring the visitors as they sprayed it about – continued into the second half. Often, the hosts gave the impression that they possessed an extra gear and could shift into it and score more if they really needed to. Costa’s 53rd-minute cross-cum-shot that hit the underside of the bar nearly sealed the win. However, though Venezuela were still a distant second in this half, their set-pieces increasingly improved in quality; one provided unexpected hope. Indeed, Luis Manuel Seijas’ 64th-minute corner was headed by Oswaldo Vizcarrondo to the back post and knocked in by the thigh of Christian Santos in what was his first ever competitive international. Just like that, Venezuela had halved the deficit.

Though the Castelão crowd were momentarily silenced – even the TVes Venezuelan commentators were taken aback – the goal did not significantly alter the game’s complexion; ten minutes later, it was over. Costa’s whipped cross from the left bounced before defender Fernando Amorebieta who opted to use his left boot on the turn to try to clear the ball. Unfortunately for his pride, he swung and failed to make any meaningful contact, with Ricardo Oliveira instead profiting; the Santos striker needed no invitation to score on what was his first start for his national side in over ten years.

Brazil comfortably saw out of the remainder of the game, doing so with Kaká and then later, Hulk, on the field – much to the delight of the squealing females in attendance. While the heat is still very much on coach Dunga, for the next few weeks at least, he will surely be sleeping far more soundly than his Venezuelan counterpart.

What follows are some thoughts on the Venezuelan display. 

Venezuela’s Defence Lacking the Necessary Resilience of the Recent Past 

Against Paraguay, aside from the late gift Baroja and Vizcarrondo delivered to Derlis González – which, considered alone, could be dismissed as an aberration – Venezuela’s defence largely put in a respectable performance. Alas, against vastly superior Seleção opponents, nobody could be said to have emerged favourably.

Goalkeeper Baroja failed to get a strong pair of hands behind Willian’s early goal and was unconvincing with a few of his attempted claims and stops. Right-back Rosales (who can not always replicate his impressive club form for his country), along with left-back Gabriel Cichero, often struggled with the flank attacks of Willian, Costa, Alves and Luis – the second and third goals came from Rosales’ side and Cichero was hoodwinked by Oscar’s dummy on the second. Centre-back Amorebieta stood off Willian for the first, allowing him to strike and was especially embarrassed on the third with his unnecessary air-kick. His partner Vizcarrondo did not play as prominent a role in the concession of goals – conversely, he assisted Venezuela’s solitary effort – but he could have done:  in the 14th minute, he was manfully shrugged off a long ball by Oliveira who ran towards goal in considerable space but shot too close to Baroja.

Collectively, they were regularly given the runaround, struggling to maintain their shape and organisation. Such a performance, considered alongside many other unconvincing displays, increasingly makes the disciplined 1-0 win over Colombia at Copa América look like a curious anomaly. Venezuela’s impressive showing in the last qualification cycle was built upon a relatively strong defence, yet this has rarely been witnessed in Sanvicente’s 15-month tenure. While wholesale changes are not required in this area, greater concentration and organisation levels plus two or three new competitive faces would not go amiss. Alas, regarding the latter, there does not currently appear to be anyone in a good position to fill at least one of those vacancies.

Plenty of Attackers, Few Ideas

Of course, a shaky defence could always be masked by a rampant attack – not two words one expects to put together in a sincere sentence with ‘Venezuela’ any time soon. Indeed, against Paraguay, Salomón Rondón was partnered in attack with Juan Manuel Falcón, with César González and Jeffrén Suárez on the flanks; Guerra, Josef Martínez, and Jhon Murillo were all brought on as second-half substitutes. In Fortaleza, Rondón, nominally at least, was receiving support from three different starting attackers: Santos behind him, with the returning Guerra and Vargas in wide positions. These latter two lasted 45 minutes before being replaced by Murillo and the less offence-minded Arquímedes Figuera; with under 10 minutes to go, Alexander González also came on, replacing the deeper-lying Seijas, a move which required some further positional adjustments.

In all, over these two games, nine different attacking players were used in conjunction with Rondón. Did anything that can be built on actually occur? It seems customary for many Venezuelan fans and media figures to highlight and overstate the quality of any minor piece of skill or invention displayed; to these distant eyes, nothing of note happened that was not done multiple times and with greater panache by many of their Brazilian counterparts.

Perhaps Santos’ goal will have aided his personal cause but for the most part the match was the wearily tedious tale of a group of attackers failing to both combine effectively and create ways of penetrating the opposition rearguard. It is now 15 games into Sanvicente’s reign and virtually no on-field progress in this area has been made. Can anyone, with any genuine confidence, name even one of the players in this part of the pitch that Sanvicente considers a starter? There is, after all, almost as much competition outside of the current squad as within. Further changes are a cert next month in La Paz against Bolivia, as to deal with the high altitude Sanvicente is poised to take with him a large number of home-based players; this, when against Brazil, substitute Arquímedes Figuera was the only representative of the domestic league.

One minor positive to be noted was the standard of set-pieces delivered, mostly by Seijas. Many first-half corners and free-kicks were at least reaching testing areas; by the second period, team-mates were actually making contact and of course, Santos’ headed goal came from a dead-ball put in by the Santa Fe midfielder which, in turn, was headed on by Vizcarrondo. Given the problems from open play, this has long seemed like an area well worth dedicating considerable time towards on the training ground.

Under-Fire Sanvicente Has Little Reason to Expect a Sudden Turnaround

Unsurprisingly, many have lost patience with Sanvicente, whose impressive club-level record holds increasingly little currency these days. Immediately after the Brazil game, in an admittedly completely unscientific Twitter poll, around 75 per cent of voters felt that he should no longer continue as manager. ‘Support is gained with the results and at the moment we do not have them’, he said post-game in Fortaleza. Will he have any to speak of after next month’s qualifiers away to Bolivia and at home to Ecuador? Given that afterwards there will be a four-month gap before the subsequent round of competitive fixtures he, and any under-fire manager knows, just how crucial the November encounters will be.

While some may derive optimism from the competitive debuts of both bright new things, Jeffrén and Santos, it has undeniably been a thoroughly depressing opening to the campaign. Aside from the performances, captain Tomás Rincón was pilloried online by many of his own fans for swapping shirts on the pitch at half-time with two-goal Willian, ultimately the undoubted man of the match. Although professionals such as El General may view such acts differently, symbolically it played into the hands of Vinotinto supporters who feel the team lacks bite, self-respect and character.

Furthermore, before and after the Brazil game, Santos and Alexander González had goods stolen from their luggage at two different Venezuelan airports (UPDATE: Andrés Túñez also had similar problems). There has been some speculation that morale and the general atmosphere in the camp is rather low – such incidents are obviously not likely to help.

Given all that has occurred over the past week or so, it is going to take something rather unanticipated to improve Sanvicente’s mood before the end of the year.

Team Selections

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s CONMEBOL Qualifying Campaign for FIFA World Cup 2018 – October 2015 Preview

With Venezuela set to begin their latest quest to qualify for their first-ever World Cup, Hispanospherical.com looks at the burden of expectation carried by manager Noel Sanvicente, the loss of the talismanic Juan Arango and provides an overview of those likely to take to the field against Paraguay and/or Brazil.

CONMEBOL Qualifiers for FIFA World Cup 2018

Thursday 8 October 2015 – Estadio Cachamay, Puerto Ordaz, Ciudad Guayana, Bolívar State.

Venezuela vs Paraguay

Tuesday 13 October 2015 – Estádio Plácido Aderaldo Castelo, Fortaleza, Ceará.

Brazil vs Venezuela 

sanvicenteturineseVenezuela manager Noel Sanvicente speaking on the eve of the Paraguay game (Via: Humberto Turinese)

Under-Fire Sanvicente Knows What the Fans Crave 

‘I’m not here to win Copa América, I’m here to get us qualified [for the next World Cup]. If not, it’s a failure’. Back in June just days before the Chile-hosted tournament kicked off, Venezuela manager Noel Sanvicente forcefully set out the terms on which he believes his tenure will be judged.

In the four months that have since passed, the rod ‘Chita’ appears to have built for his own back has only enlarged. True, there was the expectation-escalating euphoria of mugging Colombia 1-0 on that frenetic opening sunday in Rancagua, but just seven days later La Vinotinto were booking their flights home. Having been vanquished by both Peru and Brazil, Venezuela’s group-stage exit marked their worst performance in the competition since 2004. However, when the squad was reconvened last month for two home internationals, the largely identical line-ups that were fielded had the chance to vindicate the views of many fans; namely, that in June they had merely been unfortunate victims of a tough draw as well as a certain refereeing decision/one player’s moment of ill-discipline (depending on who you talk to and on which day of the week).

Such sentiments were soon to evaporate, which is more than can be said for the rain at Estadio Cachamay, home of Mineros de Guayana. Indeed, following an eyebrow-raising 3-0 trouncing meted out by Honduras, the subsequent online storm that it sparked was paralleled in the weather conditions at this deceptively photogenic ground. Subsequently the second game against Panama had to be delayed for over 20 minutes before commencing in what were rather A & E-friendly circumstances. Swashbuckling, it was not, though both teams were not short of opportunities to make a splash. Two opposition players had to be substituted off within the first 25 minutes and had Salomón Rondón not tapped in an injury-time equaliser, he and his compatriots may have opted against emerging from the swamp.

Before these encounters, Sanvicente and several others in the camp had emphasised the importance of winning their home games, given the lengthy distances and varied playing conditions they will face in CONMEBOL qualifying. This week, as well as pointing favourably to the example of Ecuador last time around, he has voiced a similar outlook ahead of his country’s opening World Cup qualifying match with Paraguay: ‘For any team, the first match is all-important. To qualify, this match must be won.’ Such comments grant him little room to manoeuvre should things have gone awry just 90 minutes into a two-year campaign. However, they do testify to both his winning mentality (seven domestic titles as coach) as well as the expectations that now come with the job.

His predecessors have a lot to answer for. The cumulative work from 1999-2013 of José Omar Pastoriza, Richard Páez and, in particular, César Farías enabled Venezuela to belatedly emerge as a force within the region, regularly attaining ever-greater heights. Under Farías, they recorded their best ever Copa América performance (4th in 2011) as well as, positionally at least, their highest finish in a World Cup qualifying campaign (6th of 9 teams for Brazil 2014).

Given this backdrop of rapid transformation, any deviation from the seemingly inevitable march of progress runs the risk of provoking the collective ire of fans. The early Copa exit, compounded by the subsequent friendly defeats, has raised significant doubts in the minds of many as well as given further ammunition to those with long-standing grievances with the team’s displays since Sanvicente took over in July 2014. Midfielder Luis Manuel Seijas acknowledged this disgruntled element after the Honduras debacle, though was evidently not keen on any kind of rapprochement: ‘We’re surely getting crucified, but let’s hope that in October, when we win in the first match, they won’t get in the victory bus with us’. Alternatively, if worst comes to worst, they should withhold their home-made torture devices for the time being and then ‘[c]rucify us in October if things don’t go well for us.’ Two straight losses against Paraguay and Brazil and the mob will not need any encouragement.

One of the consistent complaints during Sanvicente’s reign has been the lack of effective attacking play and, as a consequence, goals. Overall, just 13 (15 unofficially) have been scored in as many games. However, apologists for the current regime will be keen to recall that things were no better during Farias’ reign, with the team only managing to score 14 in the 16 games of their admirable 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign. Yet, Sanvicente has got a task on his hands if he is to even match that tally, particularly as one key architect and supplier of those goals has recently confirmed that he will not be there to assist on the road to Russia 2018.

The Post-Arango Era: Replacing the Irreplaceable

Video of all but one of Juan Arango’s goals in World Cup Qualifying games (YouTube). His final one against Bolivia can be viewed here.

A 15-minute run-out at the Estadio Cachamay on the night of the Panama game was no way to end the 16-year international career of the most-capped, highest-scoring and, quite simply, greatest player in Venezuela’s football history. Alas, that  was, by choice, the end of the road for Juan Arango, the man who future generations should easily be convinced into believing inspired the cliché ‘cultured left foot’. In the next two years there will be far fewer left-footed pearlers gliding through the air, far fewer pinpoint set-pieces and far fewer nonchalant flicks and exquisite through-balls. Some doom-mongers fear there could even be none of the above; this is something no convert to the CONMEBOL cause wishes to hear.

Aside from the goals and assists, the departure of La Zurda de Oro also deprives the side of a certain confidence and appeal to outsiders that is difficult to find elsewhere in the squad. This is, after all, the man who blithely informed German newspaper Bild that he is, in fact, a better free-kick taker than Cristiano Ronaldo; an assertion backed up by many observers, including one of the most august global football sources. Appreciation for his talents is such that even the Bundesliga’s official YouTube channel temporarily removed its impartiality cap to endorse El Huracán del Caribe as their favourite player in a much-viewed video of all his goals at Borussia Mönchengladbach (2009-2014). Furthermore, earlier this year, one of his team-mates from this period, a certain Marco Reus, paid tribute to him in an interview; he is far from alone in his admiration.

Following the dismal day out at the waterpark with Panama, his Vinotinto companions joined him at a teary-eyed press conference and soon afterwards were quick to express their gratitude and respect for El Capi, at times approaching idolatry with their praise. Arango had announced that he had been mulling over retirement for a while and that, ultimately, he did not possess the motivation for another lengthy campaign and it was time to give others a chance.

Talk of the post-Arango era has steadily increased ever since his 2014 move back to Mexico with Xolos de Tijuana following a decade in Europe shared between Spain and Germany. Undoubtedly, he was slowing down, tracking back less and being less of a decisive factor in games. However, as he remained an on-field influence right up until his last competitive game, the claims that his iconic status combined with his diminishing mobility made him a hindrance to reshaping the national team’s attack still needs some visible supporting evidence – this may take some time to emerge. Indeed, though Venezuela could only manage two goals at Copa América, Arango played a major part in both. Against Colombia, it was his hooked cross on the turn that Alejandro Guerra nodded across for Rondón to head in and against Brazil it was one of his trademark free-kicks – one of only a few he was actually allowed to take – that was parried back for Miku to halve the deficit late on and cruelly get everyone’s hopes up. .

Furthermore, in the last qualification cycle, he scored three goals – including this stunner against Ecuador – and set up some other memorable ones, including Fernando Amorebieta’s history-making winner against Argentina and Rondón’s late equaliser away to Uruguay.  Who then, could possibly fill his boots?

Team Preview: In Search of an Attack

No-one, is the gut reply. Instead, it seems Sanvicente will attempt to ensure that those in the attacking positions can combine to offer something different which adds up to more than the sum of their individual parts. Guerra and Ronald Vargas were the two wide-men who flanked Arango in June, though based on Sanvicente’s press comments as well as sources close to the side, they may not be reprising their roles against Paraguay. Indeed, renowned journalist Humberto Turinese, who regularly travels with the squad, has stated that Venezuela will line-up in a 4-2-2-2 formation, Rondón being joined up front by Juan Falcón with César González and Jeffrén Suárez playing in the space behind.

While the formation may well alter during – if not before – the match, if the personnel changes are accurate then this is a wholesale supplanting of the Guerra-Arango-Vargas triumvirate that began behind Rondón in all three Copa games. Long-time followers of the national side will be aware that despite the lack of recent success in this area, it is the most competitive in the squad, yet no-one in the current crop has been able to claim a regular spot supporting the West Bromwich Albion striker for any sustained period of time. Nevertheless, for any newcomers, here is a brief overview of some of the other attackers who may feature:

Falcón, a forward at Metz who was not even in the Copa squad, won some praise for his lively display against Panama after he came on as a first half-substitute for Christian Santos, the NEC Nijmegen attacker who is also in this squad and is currently one of the top-scorers in the Eredivisie with 5 goals in 8 games. 33-year-old González, a regular under Farías who had to make do with being a substitute in June, appears to have won a start off the back of his scintillating domestic form with Deportivo Táchira – 7 goals in 8 games. Jeffrén, by contrast, only made his international debut last month just as Arango was departing. One in, one out, some might say. The 27-year-old graduate of Barcelona’s La Masia academy and erstwhile Spain youth international finally agreed to play for the country of his birth and is doing well rebuilding his career at Belgian side KAS Eupen following some injury setbacks.

Needless to say, if such an attack does emerge from the tunnel then it is quite a bold risk from Sanvicente, who has named very similar line-ups for the past five games. While Turinese is a respected figure, it must be noted that other outlets, such as the popular Twitter account Mister Vinotinto, are anticipating a different line-up. Whatever the reality, should Sanvicente opt otherwise or perhaps need to make further adjustments after the first whistle has been blown, then along with Santos, Guerra and Vargas, there are at least two other options at his disposal. For one, there’s Josef Martínez, a slippery. versatile attacker who many in his homeland feel is a definite star for the future but who has struggled to really nail down a regular place at Torino. A second possibility is another much-vaunted prospect, 20-year-old Jhon Murillo, who is on loan at Tondela in the Portuguese top-flight from Benfica. The Lisbon giants signed him on a five-year-deal following two eye-catching seasons at domestic club Zamora.

Over the course of two years, observers can expect to see at least a few different organisational and personnel changes in this area of the field. Outside of the current squad, there is a handful of other players who could well be in with a chance, with two names in particular standing out as long-term prospects. Firstly, the injured Rómulo Otero, a jinking playmaker/wide-man whose set-pieces have at times drawn comparisons with those of Arango; a few months back he made his long-awaited move away from Caracas ending up, somewhat surprisingly, at Chilean outfit Huachipato. There is also 21-year-old Juanpi who, to the chagrin of some, Sanvicente feels needs a bit more first-team club experience. Indeed, while he may not always be named in the Málaga line-up, he does already have substitute appearances at the Bernabéu and Camp Nou under his belt this season. Time will tell whether he is best-suited to an attacking-midfield or a more reserved, deep-lying role.

Team Preview: Rincón’s Role Crucial

Despite the focus on the forward problems, the defence is certainly not without its flaws, conceding at a rate of two per game under Sanvicente. However, although they have been porous in non-competitive encounters, they only let in three in as many matches at Copa América, with the clean sheet and solid, disciplined performance against Colombia earning them plaudits around the world. While there are still some debates to be had here, things are, at the moment at least, a little more settled in this area. Against Paraguay, Alain Baroja will definitely be in goal, with Málaga’s tenacious Roberto Rosales at right-back and Sion’s Gabriel Cichero at left-back (though the suspended Fernando Amorebieta could return for the Brazil game). In the centre of defence will be the towering Oswaldo Vizcarrondo of Nantes, though Thailand-based Andrés Túñez may lose his spot to 34-year-old Franklin Lucena, if Turinese’s reporting is accurate. If this is the case, Túñez may be paying for his roles in the goals of Brazil’s Thiago Silva and Roberto Firmino – both of whom, incidentally, are not in the Seleção squad – in June as well as some errors in September’s friendlies. On a related note, the defence as a whole should also be pleased that Robinho – who had a great game three-and-a-half months ago, setting up the first goal – has not been called up; Chelsea’s Willian, however, who jinked past Rosales to cross in for Firmino to tap in the second, is.

In front of the back four will surely be the usual partnership of Seijas and new captain Tomás RincónMany will be looking to El General, currently with Serie A side Genoa, to assert his character on all his colleagues and instil within them the determination and mental toughness that he has long displayed, most notably in the run to the semi-finals of 2011’s Copa América. He has worn the armband on many occasions in the past and now with the official designation, he can be proclaimed with firmer justification to be the most important player in the Venezuelan ranks. Indeed, while Rondón may ultimately grab more headlines, with goals not anticipated to fly in with any regularity, Rincón’s leading role in repelling attacks and communicating with the defence-minded players around him will be key. To have any chance of prospering in this qualifying campaign, similar tactics, work-rate and organisation to those witnessed against Colombia will surely be essential. If Rincón and co. can successfully thwart, the onus will be on Rondón and whoever is immediately behind him to capitalise.

Ultimately, to state the blindingly obvious, it is not going to be easy for Noel Sanvicente. As well as the issues raised here, he must contend with the quality of the CONMEBOL region being arguably at its strongest in living memory as well as the additional problem of having Brazil return to the qualification trail to compete for what are potentially five World Cup places.

Indeed, their south-easterly neighbours, now managed by Dunga, are the only team left in the confederation that Venezuela have never beaten in a competitive match. Only the eternal optimists are considering this record to be broken next Tuesday. For now, the attention in the camp is narrowly focused on Paraguay, against whom in the same fixture the campaign for Brazil 2014 officially ended following a frustrating 1-1 draw in westerly San Cristóbal. That occurred on Venezuela’s final matchday; if Sanvicente’s pre-game words are to be taken at face-value, a failure to beat La Albirroja this time around could mean he feels their quest for Russia 2018 is all-but-over at the first hurdle.

Such an outcome would be disastrous for morale and the pressure on the coach and players would undoubtedly increase. Still, as long-time followers of football in this continent know, if a week is supposedly a long time in football, then try two years. Players can gradually emerge, teams can belatedly gel and circumstances can change. Whatever happens this week, it is going to be quite the long-distance assault on the senses. Hispanospherical.com hopes you manage to remain in one piece and stick around to see it to its conclusion.

Venezuela Squad

Goalkeepers: Alaín Baroja (AEK Athens), José David Contreras (Deportivo Táchira), Wuilker Fariñez (Caracas FC).

Defenders: Fernando Amorebieta (Middlesbrough, on loan from Fulham), Wilker Ángel (Deportivo Táchira), Gabriel Cichero (Sion), Alexander González (Young Boys), Roberto Rosales (Málaga), Andrés Túñez (Buriram United), Oswaldo Vizcarrondo (Nantes).

Midfielders: Rafael Acosta (Mineros de Guayana), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), César González (Deportivo Táchira), Alejandro Guerra (Atlético Nacional, on loan from Mineros de Guayana), Franklin Lucena (Once Caldas, on loan from Deportivo La Guaira), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, on loan from Benfica), Tomás Rincón (Genoa), Luis Manuel Seijas (Santa Fé), Ronald Vargas (AEK Athens).

Forwards: Juan Falcón (Metz),  Josef Martínez (Torino),  Salomón Rondón (West Bromwich Albion), Christian Santos (NEC Nijmegen), Jeffrén Suárez (KAS Eupen).

Note: Fernando Amorebieta is suspended for the first game against Paraguay.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Brazil 2-1 Venezuela – 2015 Copa América Group C (21 June 2015)

2015 Copa América Group C

Sunday 21 June – Estadio Monumental David Arellano, Santiago, Chile

Brazil 2-1 Venezuela

Highlights of Brazil 2-1 Venezuela, 2015 Copa América Group C, 21 June 2015 (Video courtesy of Copa America 2015)

Team Selections

Brazil (4-2-3-1): Jefferson; D. Alves, Miranda, T. Silva, F. Luís; Fernandinho, Elias; Willian, Coutinho (Tardelli, 67′), Robinho (Marquinhos, 76′); Firmino (Luiz, 67′).

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): Baroja; Rosales, Vizcarrondo, Túñez, Cichero; Rincón, Seijas (Martínez, 46′); R. Vargas (C. González, 46′), Arango, Guerra (Miku, 72′); S. Rondón.

Late Rally Not Enough as Venezuela Exit Copa América

Match Report

Although Brazil and Venezuela could well have conspired to draw this final group stage game to ensure the pair progressed from Group C, the Seleção were evidently in no mood to take any chances, ultimately sending La Vinotinto out of the competition.

While Noel Sanvicente’s men rallied late on, it was Dunga’s under-fire charges who were on top for the majority of the match, taking it to their opponents from the start with Neymar’s replacement Robinho often the ringleader. Indeed, the now 31-year-old belied his age while rampaging all across the attacking midfield area and was to set up the opening goal. His ninth-minute corner was met by PSG’s Thiago Silva, who got in front of Andrés Túñez and emphatically volleyed past Alain Baroja at a pace that the 25-year-old Caracas FC goalkeeper will have rarely encountered before.

In response to this setback, there was some urgency in Venezuela’s forward play, though they struggled to get into meaningful positions within the final third. Instead, the next chance fell to Robinho, who was really finding his groove, as Dani Alves passed to the ex-Real Madrid man just outside the area on the centre-right. With the ball gently bouncing into his stride, he swept a graceful strike just over the crossbar. A few minutes later, a bit of space enjoyed in Brazilian territory allowed Ronald Vargas to blaze over from 30 yards.

However, this was nothing compared to what was going on at the other end, as Dunga’s men regularly found room on the flanks and just past the midway point in the half put Venezuela under some sustained pressure. Indeed, soon after Willian got away from his man on the right, his Chelsea team-mate Filipe Luís marched through on the left and blasted hard from an angle, drawing a parry from Baroja. The subsequent corner was knocked down and caused many jitters in the area as two shots were desperately blocked by the swarm of Venezuelan bodies that had come back. Sanvicente’s men were not coping well with the pace of their more illustrious opponents and could often be their own worst enemies when going forward, struggling to even control some basic passes with rather heavy touches.

Attack-wise, their next moment of note came via a surprisingly under-utilised weapon in their armoury during this tournament: the set-piece. Alas, as if to further emphasise the slim pickings that they were scraping by on, Roberto Rosales’ long-range central free-kick was merely flicked on by Túñez straight into the hands of Jefferson. Most attacks in the first half were instead in and around the other area as, coming up to half-time, Roberto Firmino drove along the touchline on the left before winning a corner and then, not long afterwards, Robinho had a right-footed strike parried wide for another corner. However unintentionally, with around a minute left before the break Venezuela caused Jefferson some mild concern, when left-back Gabriel Cichero’s ball dipped a bit too close towards the goal-frame for comfort, ultimately going wide.

When half-time came, Sanvicente knew he would need to inject more attacking impetus into the side and so replaced Ronald Vargas and Luis Manuel Seijas with César González and Josef Martínez, moves which would gradually have at least some effect on proceedings. However, this was not to occur until the latter stages of the game as before this, Brazil were to continue to exert their dominance.

Three minutes into the half, the impressive Willian did a stepover and then put in a ball that hit Túñez to go behind. From the resulting corner, Silva must have thought his header was going to make it two, but instead Baroja got down low to pull off a great save that will do his growing reputation no harm at all. Nevertheless, barely a minute later the lead was indeed doubled as Willian did great on the left to get away from Rosales before putting in a delightful ball with the outside of his right that bypassed Túñez and was finished off by Firmino. 2-0 and it was hard to see how Venezuela could get back into it.

        Indeed, even though they did gradually come to make more forward forays as their opponents relaxed and the atmosphere subsided somewhat, it was not until the last five minutes or so that an actual comeback seemed possible. One rare repository of hope were the free-kicks of Juan Arango and on 56 minutes he curled one with his revered left peg that may have been going half a yard over the bar but Jefferson nevertheless tipped it on its way for a corner. Little more than a minute later, the Botafogo goalkeeper dived outwards to parry away a cross that came in from the left from substitute González. Shortly afterwards, Jefferson was further kept busy by the other man introduced for the second half, young Torino attacker Martínez, who from a crowded position on the right of the area struck well but much too close to the goalkeeper for it to be of serious concern.
        Despite these moments of optimism for Venezuela, they knew Brazil and especially Robinho still had plenty more to offer, if necessary. In the 64th minute, the winger cut inside from the left, reeling back the years to jink past a couple of challenges outside the area before shooting a few yards wide.
      Venezuela nevertheless continued their hunt for a way back into the game. In the 71st minute, Alejandro Guerra cut the ball back from the right in the area for González, who shimmied away from a defender before having his shot crucially blocked. Soon afterwards, Guerra was substituted off for Rayo Vallecano striker Miku, a move whose significance would bear some fruit later on. In the meantime, Arango put in another good free-kick that bounced before Jefferson, who had to parry out.
      By the 76th minute, Brazil had used all three of their substitutes. Two of these – David Luiz and Marquinhos – being defenders by trade, brought the total of such players on the field to six, even if they were not all playing in the back line. A minute after their final change, Venezuela were to create another half-chance as, from the centre just outside the area, Miku was to roll the ball to the incoming González who blasted a strike not too far off the target.
    In the 81st minute, Brazil again made their presence known, this time from a Willian corner. As soon as it was headed out, it was nodded back in towards Luiz, whose scissor-kick was well-struck, but too close to Baroja, who got his full body behind it to catch.
    Three minutes later, the moment that rarely seemed likely arrived. From 25 yards out, Arango swung his third and best free-kick over the wall, which Jefferson did well to save against the post but Miku was on hand to head the rebound straight in. Suddenly, Dunga’s decision to go defensive looked complacent as Venezuela were instantly buoyed by this goal, with players and fans alike doubtless instantly recalling for inspiration the two goals they scored against Paraguay in the closing stages of the last game of the 2011 group stage.
            Alas, it was not to be, though they certainly did not go out without first giving Colombia a late fright. Deep into stoppage-time, Martínez gained some space on the left and put in a cross that went over the reach of Jefferson but, unfortunately, past Miku as well and out the other side. As the final whistle blew, many Venezuelans were still debating whether or not the La Liga striker slightly ducked out of the way of the cross, but in time, Fernando Amorebieta’s tournament-changing red card in the preceding loss against Peru should be the real talking point.
                Indeed, having sensationally upset the apple cart on the opening day with a win over Colombia, Sanvicente’s men went into their second game against Ricardo Gareca’s men in the vertiginous position of being able to secure qualification with a win. Alas, the ex-Bilbao man’s dismissal was to scupper this dream. Nevertheless, dejected as serial-winner Sanvicente doubtless currently feels, he will surely have felt some optimism from his team’s overall performance which he will seek to build on ahead of his chief aim: qualifying for Venezuela’s first-ever World Cup.
Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Cruzeiro 3-0 Mineros de Guayana – 2015 Copa Libertadores Group 3 (8 April 2015)

Wednesday 8 April 2015

2015 Copa Libertadores Group 3

Cruzeiro 3-0 Mineros de Guayana

Estádio Mineirão, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais

Goal Highlights of Cruzeiro 3-0 Mineros de Guayana, 2015 Copa Libertadores, 8 April 2015 (Video courtesy of YouTube user xpertowinner)

Early Super Strikes Stun Mineros

Any hopes Mineros de Guayana had of frustrating the Brazilian champions were devastatingly dashed by two superb early goals in quick succession as Cruzeiro ultimately ran out three-goal victors.

Despite the wealth disparity between the two sides, the Venezuelans put in a respectable account of themselves in the opening ten minutes, not looking overawed or overran. Alas, a spectacular goal out of nothing soon changed that in the 13th minute. The promising Uruguayan international Giorgian De Arrascaeta, recently recruited from Defensor Sporting, was the scorer, latching onto a header from right-back Mayke and then improvising a sensational overhead-kick. Barely a minute later, Leandro Damião doubled the lead as a throw-in on the left by Chilean international Eugenio Mena fell into his path in the area and he took one touch before unleashing a superb right-footed strike past Rafael Romo.

Faced with this early double whammy, Mineros struggled to regain their focus in the aftermath and thus an embarrassing pasting of the magnitude that their compatriots at Zamora and Deportivo Táchira have eached suffered more than once in this year’s group stage seemed probable. Indeed, the two goalscorers were to regularly link up with Alisson, Willian and other team-mates to almost extend their side’s lead, with De Arrascaeta often playing a pivotal role, playing incisive through-balls from distance.

However, as the half wore on, the Venezuelans at least managed to interject with some forward forays of their own, with two attacks in particular almost leading to goals. The first of these came on 31 minutes when striker Richard Blanco chipped a ball to the edge of the area from the right that the incoming Angelo Peña – formerly of Brazilian outfit Náutico Capibaribe – headed agonisingly wide of the post. Then, not long before the whistle blew for the interval, Alberto Cabello was to have the visitors’ second chance of note which this time was a low strike, though this too was to go marginally wide of the woodwork.

After the break, while the visitors were not entirely subdued, the Brazilians were nonetheless rather comfortable, linking up well in attack and creating chances here and there. One such notable opportunity came ten minutes into the half when Henrique cut onto his right on the left and struck a low shot that Romo did well to save. Eight minutes later, the third-choice Venezuela goalkeeper also did well to block off a sneaky encroachment into the area along the left byline by Damião. Futhermore, the Cruzeiro forward was also to force the best save out of Romo in the 72nd minute when he received De Arrascaeta’s chipped ball on the right of the area and hit a rasping low shot that flicked off the goalkeeper’s glove and out. However, from the resulting corner, Romo and his team-mates were to be instantly deflated as Henrique, aided by a deflection, headed the ball into the back of the net, thus killing any doubts regarding the result, if indeed there were any.

In the 79th minute, Zamir Valoyes was to cut in from the right onto his left, hitting a fine shot that went just wide of the far post, but ultimately such efforts were too little too late for Mineros, with this game having effectively been decided within 15 minutes.

Nevertheless, despite the early setbacks, Mineros deserve some credit for not wilting in the Mineirão and maintaining some pride. With two games left, they remain the only Venezuelan side with a chance of qualifying to the knock-out stage, though as they trail the second-placed side, Club Universitario – their next opponents – by five points, they may share the fates of Zamora and Deportivo Táchira by the time next week is over. Nevertheless, irrespective of the outcome of this particular game, be sure to check back on this site and/or @DarrenSpherical for further updates on the progress of these three teams in the 2015 Copa Libertadores.

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical