Tag Archives: Yordan Osorio

Japan 1-4 Venezuela – International Friendly (19 November 2019)

With La Vinotinto, winning is now the order of the day. Below, @DarrenSpherical recounts the national team’s demolition of World Cup regulars Japan.

International Friendly

Tuesday 19 November 2019 – Panasonic Stadium Suita, Osaka, Japan

Japan 1-4 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Japan 1-4 Venezuela, International Friendly, 19 November 2019 (YouTube)

Venezuela Smash the Samurai Blue

A first-half goal-blitz spearheaded by a hat-trick-bagging Salomón Rondón gave Venezuela their third consecutive victory for the first time since 2007.

Posterity will surely gloss over the experimental composition of their hosts’ line-up and instead highlight this promising run of form from Rafael Dudamel’s men ahead of the commencement of their World Cup qualifying campaign in March.

The manager reverted to an ostensibly more cautious 4-3-2-1 formation, with Bernaldo Manzano stepping in for Júnior Moreno, yet from the off his side took the game to their opponents. Asia-based Rondón got the scoring underway in the eighth minute after he headed in a cross exquisitely supplied by jinking Yeferson Soteldo, who really made the most of his rare start.

In the 22nd minute, Wuilker Fariñez parried a close-range header to maintain the advantage and eight minutes later Rondón doubled it. This time, with a dinked pass he played through Darwin Machís and then received the ball back in the centre to finish to make it 2-0. Barely three minutes later, two became three as Yangel Herrera headed a deep cross into the path of his nation’s all-time top-scorer, who finished off a breath-taking hat-trick – his first-ever for La Vinotinto.

If Japan thought this may cause the Southern hemispherians to calm down, they were sorely mistaken: in the 37th-minute, Soteldo made it four after driving forward, playing a one-two with Machís and prodding home. Shortly afterwards, it was nearly five as Herrera cracked the post with a fine strike.

As is often the way after a side takes a commanding lead into the break, the second half bore little resemblance to the first. In this, Venezuela barely managed another shot of note, with Japan instead making most of the running. Fariñez occasionally saw his goal under threat, although he was equal to the efforts struck at him, with the solitary exception being Hotaru Yamaguchi’s 69th-minute shot from outside the area which took a huge deflection off Roberto Rosales and wrong-footed the goalkeeper to make it 1-4.

Subsequently, the hosts pressed to add more respectability to the scoreline but their efforts ultimately went unrewarded. Thus, Venezuela emerged with an impressive victory to add to their recent collection. A lot can change in four months but right now, in stark contrast to the Russia 2018 campaign, Rafael Dudamel’s men look like they will be more of a match for their South American rivals when the long road to Qatar 2022 begins in March.

Team Selections

Japan (4-4-2): E. Kawashima; S. Muroya, N. Ueda (G. Miura, 46′), S. Hatanaka, S. Sasaki; G. Haraguchi (Y. Ideguchi, 82′), G. Shibasaki, K. Hashimoto (H. Yamaguchi, 65′), S. Nakajima; M. Suzuki (K. Furuhashi, 46′) & T. Asano (K. Nagai, 65′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Hernández, Y. Osorio, M. Villanueva, R. Rosales; Y. Herrera (J. Añor, 90+2′), B. Manzano (R. Zambrano, 82′), T. Rincón;  D. Machís (R. Otero, 61′), Y. Soteldo (J. Murillo, 77′); S. Rondón (F. Aristeguieta, 90′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly International – November 2019 Preview

Venezuela are set to close out their year with a solitary friendly on Asian soil. Here, @DarrenSpherical provides a preview of this little-anticipated encounter.

International Friendly

Tuesday 19 November 2019 – Panasonic Stadium Suita, Osaka, Japan

Japan vs Venezuela

japanstadiumnov2019

Tuesday’s Venue (FIFAUTeam)

To the Far East for Three in a Row

2019 ends for La Vinotinto with an opportunity to win three games on the trot for the first time since 2007.

They face relatively familiar foes in Japan, a team with whom they normally share the friendly spoils and this will be the burgundy boys’ only game in this international break, after arrangements for a scheduled game in Bangladesh against Paraguay collapsed.

Curiously, the build-up to this match has so far been rather muted, with barely a word said by the players to the media and the official comments of manager Rafael Dudamel comprising of little more than a few lines of platitudes. If this is all symptomatic of another breakdown in the squad-media relationship, then the hacks have been uncharacteristically quiet on the matter. Perhaps more likely a cause is the game’s kick-off: 6:25am Venezuelan time.

Thus, although the contest is being televised, no-one will be anticipating record viewing figures. Nevertheless, as the team’s next scheduled encounters will be a pair of World Cup qualifiers in March, the players know that even if not many of their compatriots back home observe them, their manager certainly will.

He seems to have an increasingly clear idea of his preferred personnel as the 24-man squad for this game offers no surprise omissions, with the absences of Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA) and Jhon Chancellor (Brescia, Italy) explicable owing to visa-related matters and injury, respectively. They have been replaced in the selección by Bernaldo Manzano (Tolima, Colombia, on loan from Deportivo Lara) and Williams Velásquez (JEF United, Japan, on loan from Watford, England). Zulia’s Gabriel Benítez is also present, increasing his standing following his last-minute call-up and subsequent debut against Trinidad & Tobago last month.

At the other end of the pitch, as Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA) has excommunicated himself from Dudamel’s regime, once again Fernando Aristeguieta (Monarcas Morelia, Mexico) and Andrés Ponce (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) are competing to grapple with the unenviable task of trying to knock Salomón Rondón (Dalian Yifang, China) off his perch. Also, as was the case last month, Boca Juniors’ striker Jan Hurtado has instead been sent to the Under-23 squad who, this weekend just gone, have prepared for January’s 2020 Olympics qualifying tournament with two defeats against Paraguay (3-1 and 3-0).

Otherwise, following on from some impressive recent performances, Rómulo Otero (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil) will be hoping to cement his place in the line-up. The chances of this occurring will be greatly increased if his manager continues with the more attack-minded 4-2-3-1 formation that was utilised to effect against Bolivia and Trinidad & Tobago last month. Away against World Cup-qualifying Japan, however, he may well revert to his more cautious and customary 4-3-2-1.

Ultimately, either way, if a rare trio of consecutive wins can be achieved, the smattering of dedicated early-risers won’t mind too much about the means by which it is attained.

To keep track of how things pan out, please continue to check this website as well as @DarrenSpherical for updates.

Venezuela Squad

VinotintoNov2019

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (Silkeborg IF, Denmark).

Defenders

Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Gabriel Benítez (Zulia), Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), Nahuel Ferraresi (Porto B, Portugal, Club Atlético Torque, Uruguay), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Yordan Osorio (Zenit Saint Petersburg, Russia, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Leganés, Spain), Mikel Villanueva (Málaga, Spain) & Williams Velásquez (JEF United, Japan, on loan from Watford, England).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Málaga, Spain), Yangel Herrera (Granada, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Granada, Spain), Bernaldo Manzano (Tolima, Colombia, on loan from Deportivo Lara),  Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Rómulo Otero (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA), Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil) & Renzo Zambrano (Portland Timbers, USA).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (Monarcas Morelia, Mexico), Andrés Ponce (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) & Salomón Rondón (Dalian Yifang, China).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela 2-0 Trinidad & Tobago – International Friendly (14 October 2019)

Another routine victory for Venezuela. Below, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto’s welcome dalliance with consistency…

International Friendly

Monday 14 October 2019 – Estadio Olímpico de la UCV, Caracas, Venezuela

Venezuela 2-0 Trinidad & Tobago

Video Highlights of Venezuela 2-0 Trinidad & Tobago, International Friendly, 14 October 2019 (YouTube)

Two Triumphs in a Row for Early-Rising Vinotinto

Following on from their 4-1 win over Bolivia in the same stadium, Venezuela ran out comfortable victors in their second consecutive game on caraqueño soil.

Prior to the opening whistle, Tomás Rincón was honoured on the pitch ahead of what was to be his 100th game for the national team. Subsequently, entirely in keeping with the chief characteristics of their captain, the burgundy boys put in a committed and disciplined performance, effectively putting the game out of sight before the quarter-hour mark.

Indeed, from the off, Venezuela took the game to their Caribbean opponents. Salomón Rondón could well have put the hosts ahead after just six minutes when he anticipated and controlled Rolf Feltscher’s cross, but his blasted strike was too close to goalkeeper Adrian Foncette. However, it would only be another five minutes before the country’s all-time record goalscorer could right this wrong: following on from a low right-sided cross by Darwin Machís, the ball found the striker’s feet and he converted from inside the six-yard-box to make it 1-0. Then, barely two minutes later, Granada attacker Machís also continued his recent spell of good form by doubling the lead after cutting inside from the left and, from just outside the area, striking with his right boot. In all honesty, Foncette should have easily stopped this admittedly-wicked, low drive, but this thought certainly did not trouble the La Liga man as he celebrated his third goal in as many games for club and country.

Subsequently, Rafael Dudamel’s team continued to probe, but their actual attempts on goal amounted to little more than a low Rómulo Otero strike that was parried and a Machís cross-shot that narrowly eluded his team-mates in the area.

During this period, Trinidad & Tobago did sometimes manage to alleviate the pressure on their defence and get forward, though without really troubling Wuilker Fariñez’s goal. That is, until the end of the half when they had two chances in quick succession: first, in the 43rd minute when, after a low cross evaded the sliding studs of Levi Garcia by a matter of centimetres, Marcus Joseph struck a left-footed effort from inside the area; this may have grazed the gloves of Fariñez but it was nevertheless always arcing wide of the target. Then, in stoppage-time, Garcia launched a free-kick from distance that deflected off a Venezuelan head, forcing the Millonarios stopper to force the ball over the bar.

Minus the goals, the second half was not too dissimilar in terms of the overall play but, owing to the home side’s clear superiority and two-goal advantage, lacked dramatic tension.

Venezuela had the majority chances, starting with Otero’s low strike in the 51st minute, which was followed two minutes later by a great ball from the right that Rondón – had he got his footwork sorted out – could have finished off. The visitors’ main chance arrived just before the hour mark when Ataullah Guerra dragged a strike wide of substitute Rafael Romo’s goal.

At times, Venezuela tried to combine centrally and nearly had success in the 62nd minute when, capitalising on a stray pass, a rapid move ended with Rondón laying the ball off to Otero, but the latter’s close-range strike was parried. Eight minutes later, a corner nearly led to that elusive third goal as substitute Juanpi’s cross was headed by Yordan Osorio towards the back post; his centre-back partner Mikel Villanueva lunged for it but, alas, could not connect as the ball instead went out for a goal kick. Finally, another substitute, Yeferson Soteldo, engineered Venezuela’s last chance of the game in the 83rd minute when he went on a characteristic run into the left side of the area. Ultimately, however, his low effort was blocked by the legs of the angle-narrowing Foncette.

Overall, even though this game is unlikely to live long in the memories of most, no doubt Capitán Centenario Rincón will not forget it in a hurry and neither will Gabriel Benitez. Indeed, the wing-back from Zulia made his international debut at the beginning of the second half, having only been called up to the squad a mere few days beforehand.

For coach Dudamel, it was a good work-out and an essential win and he can now bask in the incredibly rare feeling of emerging victorious in two consecutive games. For the time being at least, perhaps he has calmed down some of the speculation that the players were not entirely on-board with his plans and methods. That said, less than 24 hours after the final whistle, a barbed, dismissive comment from the self-exiled Josef Martínez directed towards Rincón and Rondón suggests that those particular flames show little sign of being entirely extinguished.

If there are any responses to his words, it’s most probable that they won’t arrive until the next time La Vinotinto re-assembles: next month for an Asia-based double-header against Paraguay and Japan.

Team Selections

Venezuela (4-2-3-1): W. Faríñez (R. Romo, 46′); R. Hernández (G. Benítez, 46′), Y. Osorio, M. Villanueva, R. Feltscher; J. Moreno, T. Rincón;  J. Murillo (J. Savarino, 74′), R. Otero (J. Añor, 66′), D. Machís (Y. Soteldo, 46′); S. Rondón (A. Ponce, 78′).

Trinidad & Tobago (4-4-2): A. Foncette, A. Jones, S. Bateau, A. David, K. Julien; A. Andrews (R. Russell, 79′), N. Hackshaw, K. George, L. Garcia (A. Garcia, 65′); M. Joseph (A. Fortune, 74′), A. Guerra (D. Carr, 82′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela’s Friendly Internationals – October 2019 Preview

Following on from last month’s dreary draw with neighbours Colombia, Venezuela are back in action with two rare home friendlies. What’s more, they find themselves in the jarring position of being the favourites to emerge victorious from both. Ahead of these, @DarrenSpherical provides a glimpse into the Vinotinto orbit.

International Friendlies

Thursday 10 October 2019 – Estadio Olímpico de la UCV, Caracas, Venezuela

Venezuela vs Bolivia

Monday 14 October 2019 – Estadio Olímpico de la UCV, Caracas, Venezuela

Venezuela vs Trinidad and Tobago

caracasstadium

Estadio Olímpico de la UCV, Caracas, Venezuela

Back in the Capital with Farías but without Martínez

The Venezuelan national team’s first game in the capital city for eight years will also see the return of a prominent compatriot who was then at the helm of La Vinotinto: current manager of Bolivia, César Farías.

It was he who led his homeland from 2007 to 2013, with his achievements including reaching the semi-finals of the 2011 Copa América, as well as taking the Under-20s to their first-ever World Cup (2009). Thus, on 10 October his adopted nation of entirely domestic league players will be duking it out with the country of his birth, now bossed by the man who led the same age category to their second-ever World Cup appearance two years ago.

However, although Rafael Dudamel has paid tribute to Farías in the build-up, there has been far more media interest in the resignation from national-team duty of striker Josef Martínez. Indeed, two weeks ago, the Atlanta United netbuster wrote an open letter in which, after casting doubt upon the motives and behaviour of others and airing personal grievances regarding mistreatment, he announced that he would no longer be available for La Vinotinto for as long as the current incumbent remains in situ. In response, Dudamel has defended himself against the charges of mishandling the relationship, suggesting instead that the player’s annoyance may really stem from not being the guaranteed regular that he is at club level, whilst stating that the door nevertheless remains open to him. In turn, any fear of a collective revolt has seemingly already subsided as at least six players including the returning senior trio of Salomón Rondón (Dalian Yifang, China), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) and Roberto Rosales (Leganés, Spain) have all commented that they disagree with Martínez’s decision.

As he has largely been relegated to cameo appearances from the bench and – for reasons of dubious legitimacy – excluded himself from some games in the past year, the 26-year-old MLS striker’s withdrawal may, to some, seem manageable in the short-term. However, as Venezuela frequently look toothless in attack, when things inevitably go awry, there will doubtlessly be no shortage of calls from the many champions of the MLS goal-machine for a change to this unhelpful state of affairs and, perhaps, to the Vinotinto status quo itself.

Nevertheless, as the boss evidently prefers just one man up top, there is no doubt that for this role he instead prefers 30-year-old China-dweller Rondón. Competition within the current crop comes from Fernando Aristeguieta (Monarcas Morelia, Mexico) as well as Andrés Ponce (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), although both men have got a lot of convincing to do, as neither could confidently call themselves the first-choice understudy. For some fans, more long-term hope is invested in the boots of 19-year-old Boca Juniors striker Jan Hurtado. However, this time he did not make the cut from the 30-man preliminary squad and has instead joined up with the U23s who are hoping to play at next year’s Olympic Games.

Otherwise, although Dudamel may be a tad unnerved by Martínez’s decision as well  as his task of keeping the collective mentality healthy, he nevertheless has a strong squad to pick from. Indeed, along with Rondón, Rincón and Rosales, he also has central defender Yordan Osorio (Zenit Saint Petersburg, Russia, on loan from Porto, Portugal) back for selection, fresh from impressing in the UEFA Champions League. Also having impressed at club level in the past month are the Barcelona-slaying duo at Granada, Yangel Herrera and Darwin Machís, as well as Brazil-based pair Rómulo Otero (Atlético Mineiro) and Yeferson Soteldo (Santos). The latter was named his club’s player of the month and, after scoring against Fluminense, imitated Martínez’s goal celebration, stoking speculation that he was set to also depart the international scene – a claim that he has recently refuted.

Although Dudamel spoke at length at his customary press conference on the eve of the first match, he did not provide many hints regarding to his line-up plans. That said, most regular Vinotinto observers would surely agree that the attacking-midfield spots behind Rondón as well as the defence in general are where most of the healthy competition for places currently resides. Regarding the latter, Dudamel himself spoke of the wealth of options at centre-back, but one wonders if over at left-back, given the omission of Luis Mago, a start could be given to the man who replaced him before the hour-mark against Colombia: Bernardo Añor. Brother of Juanpi (Málaga, Spain) and son of an ex-international, he is the squad’s only representative from the domestic league, who not only plays for Caracas FC but was also born in the capital.

For the player, it would be an unforgettable way to mark the team’s return to the city. On the other hand, for the boss, whether he wishes for sentiment to enter into his thoughts or not, he knows that the best way to quash any more rumblings of player discontent will be for a double sweep over Farías’ Bolivia and Monday’s Caribbean opponents. On paper and according to the FIFA rankings, this is what is anticipated, yet during his tenure, Dudamel has only achieved consecutive victories once: a pair of 1-0 wins against Jamaica and then Uruguay at 2016’s Copa América Centenario.

Who did he field up front for both games? Yup, Salomón Rondón.

Oh, and Josef Martínez.

Both notched a goal each.

Indeed, there was once a time when this partnership was utilised to effect. Yet three-and-a-bit years later, the chances of it ever being witnessed again currently seem about as likely as Venezuela going more than a month without some internal drama.

To keep track of how things pan out, please continue to check this website as well as @DarrenSpherical for updates.

Venezuela Squad

VinotintoOctober2019Squad

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) & Rafael Romo (Silkeborg IF, Denmark).

Defenders

Wilker Ángel (Akhmat Grozny, Russia), Bernardo Añor (Caracas FC), Jhon Chancellor (Brescia, Italy), Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Yordan Osorio (Zenit Saint Petersburg, Russia, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Leganés, Spain) & Mikel Villanueva (Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Málaga, Spain), Yangel Herrera (Granada, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Granada, Spain), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Rómulo Otero (Atlético Mineiro, Brazil), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA), Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil) & Renzo Zambrano (Portland Timbers, USA).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (Monarcas Morelia, Mexico), Andrés Ponce (Akhmat Grozny, Russia) & Salomón Rondón (Dalian Yifang, China).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Brazil 0-0 Venezuela – Copa América 2019 Group A (18 June 2019)

The arc of footballing morality bends decisively towards justice as the clinical clarity of technology helps to even up the score. Here, @DarrenSpherical recounts La Vinotinto’s memorable Copa América 2019 clash against Brazil.

Copa América 2019 – Group A

Tuesday 18 June 2019 – Itaipava Arena Fonte Nova, Salvador

Brazil 0-0 Venezuela

 

Video Highlights of Brazil 0-0 Venezuela, Copa América Group A, 18 June 2019 (YouTube)

“¡Qué Viva el VAR! ¡Bienvenido el VAR!”

Those were the post-match words of Rafael Dudamel after the new technology played a significant role in frustrating the hosts and complementing what was a remarkably resilient Vinotinto display.

In all, three Brazilian goals were ruled out – one by the referee and two with the assistance of VAR. This brings the total of goals denied to Venezuela’s opponents to five in just two games and gives Venezuela two more points than their tireless defensive endeavours would have been rewarded with in previous years.

Over the course of what were in excess of 100 minutes on the pitch, the hosts saw the majority of the ball and, particularly in the early exchanges, seemed determined to compensate for their laboured performance in the opening-day win over Bolivia.

Indeed, they enjoyed over 80 per cent of possession in the first 20 minutes as they ran the Venezuelan defence ragged with quick passes and movement. David Neres and Richarlison – the two standout players from their 2017 Under-20 crop – came closest to scoring, with the former’s 15th-minute strike being sliced wide from a promising position and the latter’s 17th-minute cross-goal shot being parried wide by Wuilker Faríñez.

Despite this, Venezuela were not far off breaking the deadlock themselves when, in the 19th minute a Yangel Herrera cross was glanced agonisingly wide by Salomón Rondón. Although this moment sparked a five-minute spell of Venezuelan pressure which unsettled the home crowd, ultimately it proved to be his side’s only real opportunity of the entire game.

Seleção uneasiness appeared to have been alleviated in the 38th minute when they appeared to take the lead. Here, Dani Alves crossed in low from the right, with Roberto Firmino controlling and striking home. However, the referee was alert to the Liverpool forward pulling down centre-back Mikel Villanueva before taking aim and thus called back the play.

For the remainder of the half, although Brazil maintained overall control, Venezuela did just about leave ajar the potential for an historic upset, most notably when a 43rd-minute counter-attack saw Rondón and Murillo passing the ball between each other but, ultimately,  the latter’s crucial low cross was too close to goalkeeper Alisson.

Boos were heard from the stands at half-time as well as at various points in the second half, even though in this latter period the attacking impetus always resided with Tite’s men, as Venezuela barely made it into opposition territory. Manchester City’s Gabriel Jesús came on after the restart and soon made an impact, first curling an effort wide in 57th minute and, three minutes later, seemingly giving his team the lead. This time, his strike deflected off Villanueva into the path of Firmino, who quickly found the alert Jesús approaching the six-yard-box, who finished off. However, following a VAR review, the position of the Champions League winner Firmino was adjudged to be offside.

Home fan disgruntlement understandably increased, as did the feeling that this was not going to be their night. Not only was the technology coldly and clinically putting the game to rights, but Venezuela’s defensive performance – most notably that of centre-back Yordan Osorio – was proving resolutely defiant. The toll their tracking was taking must have been significant and was possibly a factor in the surprise 66th-minute removal of Yangel Herrera in favour of the speedy attacker Yeferson Soteldo and consequent tactical shift to a 4-4-2. Incidentally, as if to illustrate that a bright future is on the horizon, the arrival of the latter player made him the fourth 2017 Under-20 World Cup runner-up to see action.

Still, Brazil had not completely given in to fate and in the 76th minute they manufactured a scare when Fernandinho’s low cross seemed destined to be tapped in by Jesús, but Osorio’s presence instead helped divert the ball safely to Faríñez.

If the home fans were unhappy with the Portugal-based defender’s physical challenge then, just over ten minutes later, they were absolutely fuming. On the left in the 87th minute, speedy substitute Everton played a one-two before dinking a ball into the centre that Philippe Coutinho prodded home. This time, it appeared that the dam had at last been broken. However, during the VAR review, it was spotted that, before bustling into the back of the net, the Barcelona player’s strike hit the knee of his former club team-mate Firmino – who was standing in an offside position. Thus, VAR, the death of football for some was to yet again offer life to Venezuela.

Given all the stoppages – including two Venezuela players going down injured – the referee allocated nearly ten minutes of added time, during which Brazil managed to create two more chances. First, a 93rd minute low drive across goal by Filipe Luís that only narrowly evaded two sliding forwards and, with the clock approaching 100 minutes, a Fernandinho header that went less than a yard wide of the back post.

Ultimately, however, the match ended 0-0. The feelings of home frustration and disillusionment were matched by the elation and glee of Venezuelans scattered all over the globe. Indeed, even though the defensive organisation deserves enormous credit and the three goal decisions were correct, only a robot could fail to feel a giddy sense of slight fortune about the result. Brazil, whilst not brilliant, dominated proceedings, yet were thwarted by their opponents along with this new panel of arbitration that does not kowtow to home fan and player pressure.

With their two consecutive clean sheets – as well as their final four defensively sound performances in World Cup qualifying – Venezuela know that they certainly have it within themselves to collectively keep the best in their continent at bay. However, with no goals to their name yet a win against Bolivia on Saturday now being almost essential to ensuring their progress to the knock-out stages, a change of tack is surely required. Although a continuation of the same tactics could yield a counter-attacking victory, Dudamel’s men are not going to receive a better opportunity in this tournament to try out their offensive moves than against the side with zero points who also need a win. Of course, a more open game certainly leaves Venezuela somewhat vulnerable at the back but, having so far struggled to link up effectively in the final third, they need to make the most of this match. They must take the game to their opponents, get the win and make everyone genuinely believe that, rather than just being a nuisance merely postponing an inevitable pounding, their stay in Brazil could well instead be extended until the first weekend of July.

Well, after what was experienced in Salvador, anyone could be forgiven for dreaming.

To keep up-to-date with Venezuela’s Copa América campaign, please return to this website as well as follow @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

Brazil (4-2-3-1): Alisson; D. Alves, T. Silva, Marquinhos, F. Luís; Casemiro (Fernandinho, 58′), Arthur; Richarlison (G. Jesús, 46′),  P. Coutinho, D. Neres (Everton, 72′); R. Firmino.

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Hernández, Y. Osorio, M. Villanueva, R. Rosales; J. Moreno, Y. Herrera (Y. Soteldo, 66′), T. Rincón; J. Murillo, D. Machís (A. Figuera, 76′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 86′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Venezuela – Copa América 2019 Preview

It’s here! Nothing else matters, least of all your sanity or “career”! The rest of civilisation can take a running jump because the Copa América is set to kick-off! Below, @DarrenSpherical provides an overview of Venezuela’s build-up as well as which players to look out for.

Copa América 2019

Saturday 15 June 2019 – Arena do Grêmio, Porto Alegre.

Peru vs Venezuela

Tuesday 18 June 2019 – Itaipava Arena Fonte Nova, Salvador.

Brazil vs Venezuela

Saturday 22 June 2019 – Estádio Mineirão, Belo Horizonte.

Bolivia vs Venezuela

groupacopa2019

Who Are You Kidding Getting Dressed This Morning? TV. Now.

Venezuela head into the 46th edition of South America’s flagship international tournament with a better build-up than in the past two competitions.

That is not saying a great deal and nor can it be taken as an indicator of anything.

You’re welcome and hello. After all, in 2015 the selección then managed by Noel Sanvicente arrived in Chile with nine months of largely forgettable displays and no friendlies in the weeks leading up to kick-off. This did not prevent them from beating neighbours Colombia 1-0 in a passionate-yet-disciplined performance. However, they followed that up by crashing out at the first hurdle after losses in their two other group games. Subsequently, less than ten months later, languishing bottom of the World Cup Qualifying table, Sanvicente was out of a job and in came his replacement, Rafael Dudamel.

Prior to 2016’s Copa América Centenario, the ex-international goalkeeper failed to win in any of his four tightly-scheduled pre-tournament warm-ups, yet managed to turn heads by vanquishing both Jamaica and Uruguay before emerging from the group undefeated after a draw against Mexico. Acclaim soon turned to derision for the burgundy boys, however, when Argentina hammered them 4-1 in the quarter-finals and, in the eyes of some, equilibrium was restored to the natural footballing order.

Over the following 16 months, amidst ever-worsening domestic problems, Dudamel proved unable to lift La Vinotinto from last place in the Russia 2018 qualifying standings. However, speculation that the FVF may look elsewhere died down after the coach led the Under-20s to the extraordinary feat of becoming World Cup runners-up in 2017. Bolstered by a new, exciting generation, he was then able to say with considerable justification that the senior side was planning for the future and backed this up by seeing out the remaining four qualifiers without defeat. Yet of course, no momentum could be allowed to just organically build obstacle-free. Thus, after playing a solitary friendly in November 2017, financial difficulties was the stated FVF explanation behind the national team going on international hiatus and not contesting another game until September of last year. Little was helped by this except the team’s official FIFA ranking, which counter-intuitively rose from 52nd to 31st in the barren ten-month period.

However, credit where it is due: since returning to action in September 2018 they have made use of every single FIFA-designated date (as well as one that wasn’t). In all, they have faced 11, often weighty, opponents: three each from their own confederation, CONCACAF and Asia as well as two non-recognised sides stuffed full of La Liga talent.

Results have been better than in the run-ups to 2015 and 2016, if somewhat mixed: four wins, four defeats and three draws. Most spectacular of the victories was March’s 3-1 humbling of Argentina at the Wanda Metropolitano. Yet casual observers who project from this that Venezuela are therefore serious contenders for the Copa may wish to temper their prognostications by first reviewing three of the reversals: the 2-1 against Catalonia just three days after mauling Messi’s mob, the 4-2 versus Basque Country last October and, most pertinently of all, the 3-1 education meted out by a star-lite Mexico against a full-strength Venezuela barely a week ago.

Dudamel himself has been somewhat sheepish about his team’s prospects, instead placing more emphasis on the tournament serving as good build-up for the true goal: qualification to Qatar 2022. Perhaps he has been chastened from earlier this year when, after many from the Venezuelan camp proclaimed their desire to win the Under-20 South American Championship, his 2019 crop failed to even qualify for the soon-to-be-concluded World Cup.

All that being said, most would back Venezuela to achieve the minimum expectation at Brazil 2019: qualifying from Group A. The opening game against Peru is largely justified as being billed as crucial, even if losing to Los Incas plus the hosts – who La Vinotinto have never beaten in a competitive game – yet pulverising atrocious-travellers Bolivia could theoretically still be enough to see them advance as one of the two best third-place teams.

Not that anyone wishes to be cornered into such a scenario. If the team does progress to the quarter-finals then, in a tournament with a healthy history of surprises – not least Venezuela’s record-best run to the semi-finals in 2011 – they could be forgiven for daydreaming about extending their stay.

After all, what the preceding nine months have produced is a relatively settled way of playing. Indeed, Dudamel evidently intends to utilise a 4-3-2-1 formation, with the defence being covered by a midfield trio of ball-winners and the striker supported by rapid transitions, particularly from the two attackers in tow. Furthermore, regarding the personnel, even if the three recent warm-up friendlies have caused some slight re-thinks – mostly in the defence – there are not likely to be any significant line-ups surprises for Saturday’s opener.

Of those nailed-on to be fielded, four players stand out as being fundamental to Venezuela’s campaign: Fledgling Faríñez and the Three R’s of Experience.

A teenager on the bench in the last two Copas, the 21-year-old sprightly shot-stopper Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia) has a big chance to further enhance his already glowing reputation and will doubtless be called upon to make up for the defence’s shortcomings. In front, whether on the left or his more-favoured right side, will be the rejuvenated Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain), who last October was brought back into the fold following a curious two-year absence and will be vitally important tenaciously tracking opponents and contributing to attacks. As ever, captain Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy) will also endeavour to be assiduous in his primary task of closing down attackers and reinforcing the defence, as well kickstarting and sometimes contributing to the forward play. Lastly, at the very top of the pitch will be recently-crowned all-time leading goalscorer Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England), who has also netted at all three Copas he’s been involved in and will be on the prowl to wound defenders’ egos with his muscular hold-up play, supreme leaping and wearying workrate.

Some of the individuals he is likely to combine with the most are amongst a secondary group of five within the squad. These are talented players with less-celebrated reputations who nevertheless possess the potential to assert themselves as indispensable assets during the tournament. In this batch are included three fleet-footed attacking-midfielders: Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), a near-certain starter against Peru who is likely to be paired with either Darwin Machís (Cádiz, Spain, on loan from Udinese, Italy) or Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA). The former appeared to have the nod up until the Mexico friendly but after being dropped from the subsequent line-up, the latter, having flourished in the 3-0 win over the USA last Sunday, has more than an outside chance. Either way, both will undoubtedly see action in Brazil.

The two other players who could rise to prominence are the pair pencilled in to aid Rincón in front of the back four: Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA) and Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England). If only due to his greater propensity to get forward, the latter has perhaps a higher chance of garnering attention, but both will certainly be wholly absorbed in their largely unglamorous roles.

Herrera, as well as Faríñez, are the two definite starters out of the five players from 2017’s Under-20 squad who have also been convened here. However, moving onto the dubious defence, if Dudamel opts to place Rosales at left-back then, with Alexander González having been omitted, the 21-year-old apprentice Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway) could make that three by taking up the right-back mantle. Alternatively, if Rosales is placed in his natural position – as he was against the USA – then Luis Mago (Palestino, Chile) would appear to be the front-runner for the left flank. That said, as Mago is far from an established fixture, he is vulnerable to being overlooked in favour of the versatile Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), who has not played in the warm-ups owing to a minor injury.

As for the centre-backs, Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain) and Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal) seem the likeliest initial partnership, what with the former playing the final two friendlies and the latter having enjoyed an encouraging club season. However, this is not a niche bet that anyone would place with confidence as Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar) was instead selected after Osorio’s poor showing against Mexico and he also started in the first warm-up against Ecuador.

So, to summarise the Venezuelan defensive quagmire succinctly: there is every chance that all seven defenders will make it onto the pitch during the tournament.

Still, despite this uncertainty as well as their tendency to get exposed, Vinotinto defences, in tandem with the midfielders, have, over the years, also occasionally shown themselves to be capable of collectively rising to be greater than the sum of their parts. This happened in the opening game of Copa América 2015, in virtually all of 2016’s group stage and also in the final four games of World Cup qualification in 2017. Admittedly, they can also ride their luck a little, although at least they now possess a highly-rated goalkeeper to save them from themselves.

Lastly, some MLS-watchers may be wondering where hotshot Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA) fits into the scheme of things. Well, although a partnership with Rondón is not completely out of the question as it was deployed at the 2016 Copa and may be used if Venezuela are chasing a game late on, it was never tried in any of the most recent friendlies. Instead, with Dudamel preferring a lone forward, Martínez is more likely to make regular appearances from the bench, whether as a replacement for Rondón or, quite plausibly, in one of the two attacking positions behind. However, for these spots he will not only be competing with Murillo, Machís and Savarino, but also with pint-sized Class of ’17 graduate Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil). The dribbler extraordinaire beloved of many talent-spotters has only played 26 minutes for the national team since last September but he has been called up as an eleventh-hour replacement for the injured Adalberto Peñaranda. His initial omission – allegedly due to a problem processing his visa for the warm-up tour in the USA – as well as that of Rómulo Otero was not greeted favourably by a considerable number of fans, but now, having met up with the side in the country where he plies his trade, he’s good to go.

As, mercifully, is yours truly. ¡Vamos chamos!

To keep track of how things pan out, please keep checking back to this website as well as @DarrenSpherical for updates.

Venezuela Squad for Copa América 2019

Ven2019CopaAmerica

Note: Owing to an injury, Yeferson Soteldo has replaced Adalberto Peñaranda.

(@SeleVinotinto)

Goalkeepers

Wuilker Faríñez (Millonarios FC, Colombia), Joel Graterol (Zamora FC) & Rafael Romo (APOEL FC, Cyprus).

Defenders

Jhon Chancellor (Al-Ahli, Qatar), Rolf Feltscher (LA Galaxy, USA), Ronald Hernández (Stabaek, Norway), Luis Mago (Palestino, Chile), Yordan Osorio (Vitória Guimarães, on loan from Porto, Portugal), Roberto Rosales (Espanyol, on loan from Málaga, Spain) & Mikel Villanueva (Gimnàstic de Tarragona, on loan from Málaga, Spain).

Midfielders

Juan Pablo “Juanpi” Añor (Huesca, on loan from Málaga, Spain), Arquímedes Figuera (Deportivo La Guaira), Yangel Herrera (Huesca, Spain, on loan from Manchester City, England), Darwin Machís (Cádiz, Spain, on loan from Udinese, Italy), Júnior Moreno (DC United, USA), Jhon Murillo (Tondela, Portugal), Tomás Rincón (Torino, Italy), Jefferson Savarino (Real Salt Lake, USA), Luis Manuel Seijas (Santa Fe, Colombia) & Yeferson Soteldo (Santos, Brazil).

Forwards

Fernando Aristeguieta (Monarcas Morelia, Mexico), Josef Martínez (Atlanta United, USA), Salomón Rondón (Newcastle United, on loan from West Bromwich Albion, England).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical

Mexico 3-1 Venezuela – International Friendly (5 June 2019)

Venezuela’s Copa América preparations are now two-thirds complete, but the team appears far from ready to set the tournament alight. Below, @DarrenSpherical recounts their encounter with El Tri.

International Friendly

Wednesday 5 June 2019 – Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Mexico 3-1 Venezuela

Video Highlights of Mexico 3-1 Venezuela, International Friendly, 5 June 2019 (YouTube)

La Vinotinto Vanquished By Martino’s Mexico

Despite taking the lead, a virtually first-choice Venezuela were comfortably swept aside by an under-strength Mexico. 

With all the Copa América players now present in the USA, Rafael Dudamel was able to field his big guns, yet they were nevertheless outplayed by Tata Martino’s Gold Cup-hunting squad which does not include the likes of Javier Hernández, Carlos Vela, Hirving Lozano and Héctor Herrera.

Early on though, it was Venezuela’s Jhon Murillo who surprised everyone – including himself – when, in the 18th minute, he sensationally struck the ball into the back of the net. Possibly caught in two minds as he shaped up on the right to whip in a cross, his ball into the area spectactularly swerved inwards and over goalkeeper Jonathan Orozco to give the South Americans a 1-0 advantage.

The largely pro-Mexico crowd were taken aback, but they soon returned to generating a frenetic atmosphere that was frequently reflected on the pitch.

Cruz Azul youngster Roberto Alvarado boosted their spirits when, in the 25th minute, he was not far off with a curled left-footed effort that went just wide of the target. Then, seven minutes later, he restored parity and drove Venezuelan defensive coaches to insanity. He made it 1-1 after a cross swung in from the right was poorly dealt with and dawdling centre-back Yordan Osorio was robbed of the ball by Rodolfo Pizarro, who nudged it to Alvarado to fire home.

For the remainder of the half, there was no lack of endeavour but both sides struggled to create clear chances. That is, until a couple of minutes before the break when Dudamel’s men nearly stunned the crowd for a second time. This time, Júnior Moreno’s corner was nodded against the post by Yangel Herrera; striker Salomón Rondón immediately lunged for the rebound, but alas, was unable to connect properly.

That was to be the last contribution of note of the Newcastle United Player of the Year as he was substituted off at half time for Josef Martínez, who received a proud ovation from the Atlanta locals who he performs in front of every other week. He arrived onto the pitch with Real Salt Lake’s Jefferson Savarino, though ultimately, the two MLS stars were to have little impact on the outcome.

Indeed, less than ten minutes after the restart, their nation fell behind. Defensive frailties were once again exposed as, on the left, Jésus Gallardo was afforded a little too much space, at the second attempt firing in a low cross that Osorio was beaten to by Pizarro. The latter’s nonchalant finish deservedly made it 2-1.

Later, in the 63rd minute, it looked as if the CONCACAF nation’s lead had been increased when, after Héctor Moreno and Raúl Jiménez had forced Wuilker Faríñez into a breathtaking double save, Diego Reyes struck third time lucky. However, owing to some dangerous, high-footed play from Wolves’ striker Jiménez, this was ruled out.

Shortly afterwards, Savarino created for himself a rare Venezuelan half-chance, but his strike from outside the area went at least a few yards wide. A better opportunity was presented in the 72nd minute after captain Tomás Rincón slid a ball into the area to Juanpi, but the shot of the La Liga midfielder lacked direction and was gratefully received by the gloves of Orozco.

Some four minutes later, the game was put beyond the reach of Venezuela. Again, fatal defensive disorganisation played a part, as on the Mexican right, substitute Carlos Antuna was afforded too much room and thus swung across a low ball that found fellow recent-arrival Andrés Guardado. Also benefitting from slack tracking, on the left side of the area he was able to strike low with aplomb to sentence the game at 3-1.

In all, given the strength of the Vinotinto line-up, it was an underwhelming performance. Perhaps adding to the concerns, at the post-game press conference, coach Dudamel claimed his team are currently at “40-50 per cent of our collective level” and also spoke of the possibility of utilising Rolf Feltscher and Luis Mago in various defensive positions.

The attacking players can not be feeling too comfortable or satisfied either, having netted just one fortuitous goal from open play in the two warm-up matches (wing-back Roberto Rosales having also scored a penalty against Ecuador). One man who will not be contributing anything more to their campaign is Adalberto Peñaranda, who was substituted off against Mexico less than ten minutes after coming on. The prognosis for him did not look good in the immediate aftermath and, today (8 June 2019), he has been officially ruled out of Copa América. To the delight of many fans, Santos-based jinking dribbler Yeferson Soteldo has been called up in his place and, in a few days, should meet up with the squad in Brazil.

Before that rendezvous, however, the national team will be travelling to Cincinnati where they have one last pre-tournament test to play against another CONCACAF Gold Cup challenger. The USA shall provide a stern test and, although friendlies may not be all about results, La Vinotinto will surely be hoping to deliver a performance that can instil belief in themselves and their committed faithful ahead of their flight to Porto Alegre.

To keep up-to-date with how things transpire in this final pre-Copa América international as well as the tournament itself, please keep checking back here as well as pay a visit to @DarrenSpherical.

Team Selections

Mexico (4-1-2-2-1): J. Orozco; F. Navarro (J. Sánchez, 68′), D. Reyes, N. Araujo, J. Gallardo; E. Álvarez (H. Moreno. 30′); C. Rodríguez, E. Gutiérrez (A. Guardado, 68′); R. Alvarado (C. Antuna, 68′), R. Pizarro (O. Pineda, 55′); R. Jiménez (A. Vega, 82′).

Venezuela (4-3-2-1): W. Fariñez; R. Hernández, Y. Osorio, M. Villanueva, R. Rosales; J. Moreno, Y. Herrera (J. Añor, 60′), T. Rincón; J. Murillo (A. Peñaranda, 76′) (F. Aristeguieta, 85′), D. Machís (J. Savarino, 46′); S. Rondón (J. Martínez, 46′).

Darren Spherical

@DarrenSpherical